Buy Used
$99.79
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Giftable Condition -Item is Fulfilled by AMAZON - Eligible for FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping. Amazon Customer Service with Delivery Tracking. Receive your item in 3-5 Days!
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book Hardcover – October 13, 1994


See all 18 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, October 13, 1994
$60.73 $7.99
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book + Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Letters + Good Faeries/Bad Faeries
Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Choose Your Own Autobiography
Step right into Neil Patrick Harris's shoes in an exciting, interactive autobiography that places the reader squarely in the driver's seat. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 64 pages
  • Publisher: Pavilion Books (October 13, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857933362
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857933369
  • Product Dimensions: 12 x 9.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (150 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #169,018 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Terry Jones is a writer, actor and director best known for his membership of the Monty Python team. He has also written a number of children's books for Pavilion, including Fantastic Stories, which won the children's vote in the 1992 Smarties Prize, and The Knight and the Squire. He lives in London. Brian Froud is a popular and highly acclaimed artist whose imaginative portrayals of fantasy worlds and people in particular are recognized He lives in Devon. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I received this book as a 16th birthday gift.
Flora DeKock
It is just a very fun and whimsical book with really great illustrations.
balisong
I took one look at this book and I was hooked.
Richard Poulsen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By MistressOfDoom on September 1, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Brian Froud is my favorite fantasy illustrator to start with. I fell in love with his book 'Faeries' back in the 70's...I am very fond of the work of his co-illustrator on that project, Alan Lee, as well. But pair Brian's brilliant art with the writing of ex Monty Pythoner Terry Jones and the result is a hilarious book that actually had me laughing out loud. Brian's lovely watercolors of shocked looking faeries (I was lucky enough to see some of his original work for the following book "Strange Stains and Mysterious Smells" this summer) pressed between the pages of the spirited Miss Cottington's journal like hapless wildflowers is just too much...and the Lady's description of the events leading up to each...er...pressing make for a thoroughly enjoyable romp. While definately not for small kids, I recommend it to anyone with a slightly grim sense of humor and a love of fantasy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Marc Cabir Davis on May 8, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book is perhaps the most twisted journal out there. I remember discovering it years ago and had forgotten about it since then, only to be redirected to it recently whilst perusing Brian Froud's website. Contrary to what many people think, I do think that this is a book for both adults and children alike, and though there is definitely some adult subject matter, its not something that should keep you from sharing it with your offspring.
The book is a reproduction of a journal kept by Angelica Cottington. Angelica can see fairies, and while she is at first surprised by their presence, she wastes no time in whisking out a journal and trapping fairies within the pages. These 'pressed fairies' are the book's centerpiece. While this may seem a cruel thing to many, Angelica does not seem to feel much remorse until much later in her life, but after a horrendous spell of being teased and mocked by goblins, she takes to pressing fairies with a vengeance once again. This is all positively delightful.
Angelica is obviously thought of as a retarded little specimen by her family and friends, but this only gives her a certain warped magnetism. Indeed, throughout the book, it is clear that a large number of men are interested in Angelica - these portions are rather graphic in their suggestiveness, and things are left open-ended. It is not clear if Angelica is molested or abused by these people, but the way she flees England for Italy due to one particularly painful encounter is hint enough that theres more going on that we aren't told about.
As is with every Froud book, the art is spectacular. The fairies we are told, aren't really 'pressed'. Even though they are momentarily captured, they have a way of leaving their psychic impressions behind on paper.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on November 30, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Lady Cottington kept a journal from the time she was a child, in 1895, until 1910. During that time, she captured many of her thoughts between those pages. Her thoughts were the least of what was caught.

As a quiet and innocent child, she would sit in the garden. If she was quiet enough, the garden fairies would come out. They would hover in front of her, over the book in her lap, and

SNAP. The book slammed shut on the fairy, leaving colored fairy-goosh on the two facing pages.

We are assured that (a few unfortunate cases notwithstanding) that the fairies were not hurt in the process and left only a psychic impression. Still, there's a queasy macabre sense about the book's premise.

It's illustrated by Brian Froud, so you know it's good. It's written by Terry Jones, a Monty Python alumnus, so you know it's funny. That's about it: good and funny. Enjoy!

//wiredweird
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 12, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book is absolutely hysterical, and is well worth the short time it takes to read. It spans the lifetime, (from a girl the age of 6) of Lady Cottington, the infamous child in the much speculated and debated fairy photo from the early 1900's that essentially started the 'fairy craze.' However, this book gives Lady Cottingtons life, and antics a very mobid, yet extrememly entertaining twist. It has become a wicked habit of hers, capturing (Slamming!) the trusting fairies that visit her in her fairy book, and keeping them. The book reads like a diary, and is handwritten, spanning early childhood to later years in her life, and details the many events,and prediciments her ability to see fairy's has gotten her into. The story itself is undeniably sharp, creative and even a bit sexual. For anyone who loves a brief outrageous read, mixing real history with fantastical elements, this book is for you!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By "silverrainbow" on June 8, 2004
Format: Hardcover
... so decrees the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Fairies in the opening note from the publisher.
This book is utterly charming and I regard it as a piece of art. The pages are "impressed" with the images of the fairies along with "handwritten notes" from her diary. Written by Terry Jones, a former member of the Monty Python troupe, this book captures the imagination and takes you to a place where fairies exist, not only in your imagination but on the pages of this ancient "diary". The jacket of the book is puffed out and the pages are a nice heavy weight and near the back of the book is the most adorable surprise. This book is a must have for any fairy collector or Froud fan.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?