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The Land That Time Forgot (Commemorative Edition) Paperback – March 1, 1999


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The Land That Time Forgot (Commemorative Edition) + Out of Time's Abyss (Caspak Trilogy) (Volume 3)
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Product Details

  • Series: Bison Frontiers of Imagination
  • Paperback: 434 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books; Cmv edition (March 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803261543
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803261549
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (39 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,549,930 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950) was a prodigiously productive writer of pulp fictions--literary entertainments, that is, published in inexpensive, easily obtained periodicals. His style was simple and instantly accessible, his stories riveting if often implausible tales of adventure, and of good overcoming evil. Burroughs wasn't much of an artist. But, as Mike Resnick writes in his introduction to this commemorative edition of Burroughs's immensely popular trilogy The Land That Time Forgot, first published in 1924, almost every book Burroughs wrote remains in print, and countless readers turn to his Mars and Tarzan novels every day.

In Land, Burroughs concocts a fabulous microworld, located somewhere in the South Pacific, called Caspak. On this mountainous island live winged, humanlike creatures, dinosaurs, ferocious beasts of prey, Neanderthals, "wild ape-men," and monstrous reptiles; they terrorize each other, to say nothing of the mixed crew of World War I-era adventurers who inadvertently land on a Caspakian beach and fight their way across the island, dining on Plesiosaurus steaks and having a grand old time in the company of a jungle princess. The story streaks onward like a bullet toward its surprise ending, and it's pure fun all the way. --Gregory McNamee

From Library Journal

Deserving a place in the small but popular submarine-adventure genre, this novella may be described as "U-571 meets Conan Doyle's The Lost World." Its protagonist is an American whose ship is sunk by a German U-boat while he is sailing to France in 1916 to serve the Allied cause. He and a beautiful young woman are the only survivors. They are rescued by an English tugboat, whose crew he leads in a brilliant capture of the enemy submarine. However, the new masters of the sub find that no one trusts their vessel, so they must seek a neutral port. What they find is something more a huge uncharted island teeming with prehistoric creatures and early humanoids. The story is anything but profound, but it moves along nicely, aided by Raymond Todd's energetic narration, and makes for diverting listening while driving. Recommended for libraries whose patrons include many commuters. Kent Rasmussen, Thousand Oaks, CA
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Which is good, because you wonder when everyone has time to stop and talk.
Michael Battaglia
I enjoyed reading this book a long time ago and when the library no longer had a copy I couldn't resist buying this book to read again.
farmerglen
Anything Edgar Rice Burroughs writes is a great romp and easy read and very enjoyable.
Hunger4Knowledge

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Claude Avary on September 22, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I first read "The Land That Time Forgot" five years ago, when it was still published in three separate short volumes: "The Land That Time Forgot", "The People That Time Forgot", and "Out of Time's Abyss" (all originally published in Blue Book in 1918). I enjoyed the story immensely, but I mistakenly treated it as a trilogy, or a series of novels like Burroughs's own Barsoom series, and read them separately, interspersed with other books. With the publication of this single volume "Commemorative Edition", I finally realized that Burroughs meant for the work to be published as one novel (which it was until the 1960s), and sat down to read it as such.
What a difference this makes. I now believe that "The Land That Time Forgot" is Burroughs's best work, and the definitive "lost world" tale. The three sections are semi-independent, but work as a whole in unexpected ways. In Part I, we are introduced to the Island of Caprona and the bizarre prehistoric land of Caspak hidden inside it, but only after a long submarine journey. Before the hero can solve the mystery of the strange evolutionary system of Caspak, we cut to Part II, which immediately launches us into an adventure on the other side of the Island with a new narrator. Many plot strands come to an end at the conclusion of this second section, but there are still some questions left, still some mysteries, and Part III brings it all to a great conclusion, when we finally see behind the curtains and learn the enigma of Caspak.
Burroughs's writing is simple, tough, and exciting, and Caspak provides endless excitement from all corners of pre-history and fantasy: dinosaurs, sea monsters, cavemen, giant mammals, and winged humanoids! And there are airplanes and German subs as well.
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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By jmcar75 on February 22, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Don't forget that the free version is not the entire trilogy. The next two are "The People That Time Forgot" and "Out of Time's Abyss" (both also free). Wonderful book and beautifully written. I've seen alot of complaints about typos in the free versions but I didn't notice any. Burroughs is great at engaging the reader throughout the entire book. There was enough description to engulf you into the story but not so much that you got bored. Great and quick read.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 7, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While Burroughs was denigrated as being a "pulp" novelist for most of his literary career, he was clearly a better writer than the vast majority of genre writers who publish today, and he was also a better story teller than most. The complaint of a reviewer that Burroughs was an obsessive racist would be hilarious if it weren't so ignorantly misguided. Similarly the complaint that Burroughs had no ear for dialogue is drenched in ignorance. The dialogue of early 20th century America is not the dialogue of late 20th century England, a fact that should not need explaining, but unfortunately explication is needed for those who who lack the most rudimentary of analytical faculties. I find Hemingway to have a tin ear for dialogue because the people I grew up with didn't speak like Hemingway characters at all, but I don't criticize Hemingway for that and suspect that he accurately recorded the cadence of his fellows. Burroughs had a good feel for the common man of the early 20th century, which is one reason his books still sell.
The Land That Time Forgot is a great adventure by a very good fantasy writer. Check it out while it's still in print.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By reader from maryland on May 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
It may not be Edgar Rice Burroughs at his best but, The Land that Time Forgot is great adventure. This book contains the three Caspak novels; The Land that Time Forgot, the People that Time Forgot, and Out of Times Abyss. Three stories that chronicle the adventures of three different men on the Antarctic sub continent of Caspak; a volcanic depression that supports a diverse and dangerous prehistoric eco-system. Bowen Tyler, the hero of the first story, leads a disabled German U-boat and English survivors into the isle of Caspak where they need to fight for survival and try to find a way to back home. In the second story would-be rescuer Tom Billings crash lands in Caspak and meets the prehistoric woman Ajor. Together they fight their way back the Ajor's home territory. The final Story, and perhaps the best is about English lieutenant Bradley and his capture by the highly evolved Weiroo men. His story shows the best of Burrough's rolling adventure style complete with unbelievable coincidences and narrow escapes only to be caught again to prolong the story. So suspend your disbelief and plunge into the world of 1914, fighting the Kiaser's men, Dinosaurs, and strange cavemen. The back drop and story line more than make up for the dated romantic ideas. Not as tight and focused as Tarzan, but where else does one get submaries and dinosuars?
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. Schuetz on February 6, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Having just read Conan Doyle's THE LOST WORLD, I perused the other books waiting for me on my father's bookshelves. I saw that he had a lot of books penned by a author whose name was familiar to me, but whose works I had never read. The first of his books that I decided to read was The Land that Time Forgot, which was collected with two other books in the same series. It took me no more than a day's time to read this wonderful book. I am rather busy during most of the day, so I merely gave up sleep in order to read this book as quickly as possible. It was similar in many ways to Conan Doyles LOST WORLD, but it differed in the aspect that it was more of a romantic adventure novel. In the lost world, the main character sets of to impress a lady friend of his, by accomplishing a heroic act, and by doing so hoping to convince her of his marriageable worth. In the Land that Time Forgot and the subsequent stories, the hero endeavors to impress his marriageable upon his love by saving her life many times over from the likes of ferocious dinosaurs, lecherous ape-like men, and of course the traitorous germans. Being written sometime between 1910 and 1920 (the date eludes me) this book is well ahead of it's time. The tale is timeless, and is not discredited in the least by advancing technology or changing philosophies. I highly recommend this book to any who enjoy Science Fiction, Fantasy, Greek Myths or any sort of adventure that challenges the courage of the human race. If you read The Land that Time Forgot and liked it, then I also recommend The Lost World (Arthur Conan Doyle), The Lost World (Michael Crichton), and the John Carter of Mars series by Edgar Rice Burroughs.
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