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Landscaping With Fruit: Strawberry ground covers, blueberry hedges, grape arbors, and 39 other luscious fruits to make your yard an edible paradise. (A Homeowners Guide) Paperback – February 4, 2009


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Landscaping With Fruit: Strawberry ground covers, blueberry hedges, grape arbors, and 39 other luscious fruits to make your yard an edible paradise. (A Homeowners Guide) + The Edible Front Yard: The Mow-Less, Grow-More Plan for a Beautiful, Bountiful Garden + Edible Landscaping
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Product Details

  • Series: A Homeowners Guide
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Storey Publishing, LLC (February 4, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1603420916
  • ISBN-13: 978-1603420914
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 9.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #168,059 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Lee Reich is an author, lecturer, and consultant whose books include The Pruning Book and Weedless Gardening. Reich grows a broad assortment of fruit plants in his own garden, which has been featured in the New York Times, Organic Gardening, and Martha Stewart Living.

More About the Author

Lee Reich, PhD started out pursuing an academic career, a trajectory that came to an abrupt halt during his second year in graduate school while studying quantum chemistry. He dropped out, moved to Vermont to ponder his next move, and, after a year, immersed himself in the study and practice of agriculture: reading popular and academic works, returning to academia by entering graduate school in agriculture, and gardening like a madman.

Three graduate degrees, work with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Cornell University, and much dirt under his fingernails later, he went off on his own as a freelance horticultural writer, consultant, and lecturer.

Out in the backyard, the garden developed and garnered awards ("Prettiest Vegetable Garden: from Organic Gardening magazine, "Best Vegetable Garden" from National Gardening magazine), and was featured in the New York Times and Martha Stewart Living. The garden also grew: Lee now considers himself a farmdener (more than a gardener, less than a farmer), tending his farmden in a small river valley in New York's beautiful Hudson River Valley. His farmden provides inspiration for his writing, a testing and observation ground for new plants, especially fruits, and, of course, plenty of delicious, healthful fruits and vegetables.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Great midwinter gardening book acquisition.
Debbie
Details different types of fruit, their strengths and growing potential, and design ideas to pull things together and make it look good.
Colorado Mom x 3
Beautiful photos, stellar information, and buckets of inspiration!
John

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

125 of 130 people found the following review helpful By BeachBrights VINE VOICE on March 9, 2010
Format: Paperback
Length: 2:31 Mins
I hope that by doing a video review, I am able to give you better glimpse inside the book. I really enjoyed this book and it's great advice on site planning. This book offers some great design elements and I was excited to start implementing more fruit plants in my garden. Yes, I said this book made me excited. It is really a fun read and an excellent resource.

Enjoy-
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101 of 104 people found the following review helpful By J. Blum on May 25, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Information on fruit growing can be found readily, but books on landscaping with fruit are not that numerous. So it was with eagerness I awaited this one. Unfortunately, I was disappointed in the "landscaping" part. It is OK for big gardens, but virtually useless for those of us with more modest ones. A small section on dwarf varieties etc.. The impression left is that a "luscious landscape" is possible only with lots of land. In fact, the landscaping section is excerpted efficiently in Carleen Madigan's "The Backyard Homestead", which also is a bit more helpful for smaller gardens. Lee Reich's book is strongest when dealing with plant care & individual plant information.
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40 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Silea TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 17, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is not intended to be a complete compendium of every edible landscaping plant, but instead focuses on a small variety that the author thinks are particularly noteworthy. Many of them are lovely three or four seasons of the year, provide tasty fruit, and are relatively easy to care for. Reading through it, i discovered a great many plants i'd never heard of that sound quite delicious.

However, the author is relatively unconcerned about invasive species. He even lists blackberries as something to put in your garden, with an offhand mention of pruning to control growth. (Here in the pacific northwest, we don't worry about a zombie apocalypse much, because the blackberry bushes are stronger, faster, meaner, and more virulent than any zombie plague.) At least a few other plants also spread via suckers and underground runners, sometimes quite determinedly, but almost no emphasis is placed on it. A gardener following the recommendations in this book may end up with a property totally overrun by blackberries and maypop because they weren't able to keep up with the plants' precocious growing habits.

My advice to anyone looking to create their own edible landscape is to use this book as a starting point. Get some ideas of which plants sound like you'd like having them around, but then go check other sources. Make sure the plants you want to grow won't run you out of your home in a few seasons, or aren't disease-prone in your area. (For example, i was planning on planting some Juneberry trees until i talked to the people at my local garden center. They told me that i'd spend so much time fighting disease on my Juneberries that even if i managed a harvest, it wouldn't be worth it.
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41 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Tipple VINE VOICE on July 6, 2009
Format: Paperback
Growing your own vegetables and fruits has come back into favor in the last year thanks to the bad economy. Instead of focusing primarily on beauty in the landscape a lot of folks went in a new direction and began planting with the idea of growing food. As the author notes in the introduction, one can plant fruit producing plants that also provide beauty in the landscape.

After the introduction, the book is essentially divided into two parts though that organization is never expressly stated by the author. The first half of the book is all about the technical details. The second half is all about the various plants. Of course, various plants are discussed and there are photographs of them in the first section, but the overriding material is regarding landscape design and placement of the plants as well as how to maintain them.

The first chapter covers "Landscape Design Basics." As implied by the title, it is how to figure out how one yard looks better that another(and not just because everything is alive and thriving), how to figure out what you have, what you want, how to use different plants to achieve different goals, etc.

"Considerations In Planting" follows with topics on weather, your local soil, types of sunlight in your area, etc.

This leads directly into the chapter titled "Growing The Plants." Spending money and effort on planting is doomed to failure if you don't know what will grow best, how to care for your soil, prune and protect against pests of all types, among other topics.

Various plans for several different layouts are found in the next section titled "Home Landscape Plans.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A. Latinak on June 4, 2011
Format: Paperback
I like this author and have some of his other books. I was hoping that the landscaping part of this book would concentrate more on what he did in his own garden. You see, he is a gardening genius. This gentleman has about 2 acres of land. On about 1/2 of that he managed to plant 40 varieties of gooseberries, 2 dozen varieties of apples/pears, a half dozen varieties of grapes, red currants, white currants, black currants, raspberries, mulberries, strawberries, 20 blueberry bushes, 20 vines of varying hardy kiwifruit, 20 pawpaw trees, chestnuts, filberts, pine nuts, a large vegetable garden, a greenhouse, and also a few ornamentals! He probably has more than this now. This is what I call landscaping! I have seen some pictures of this garden on the author's blog and even though it doesn't meet the aesthetic criteria demanded by some ornamental landscaping enthusiasts, I guarantee it would have edible landscapers drooling.

His book has a few cute landscaping plans by some other author but he talks very minimally about how he planned his own spectacular garden which he calls a "farmden". I think he needs to write another book about "farmdens" so us laymen can learn from this great master.
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