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Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought Paperback – March 14, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-0262571630 ISBN-10: 0262571633

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Language in Mind: Advances in the Study of Language and Thought + The Child's Discovery of the Mind (The Developing Child)
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Product Details

  • Series: Bradford Books
  • Paperback: 538 pages
  • Publisher: A Bradford Book (March 14, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262571633
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262571630
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #765,860 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Remember the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis—the idea that the language you speak shapes the way you think? It's been pronounced dead a number of times in the past fifty years, and yet it just won't go away. To understand why not, read Language in Mind. There the leading scholars in the field take a fresh look at Sapir-Whorf and offer intriguing new evidence for it. But they do more than just revive the hypothesis. They rework it and give it a genuinely new shape as they show how it bears on a range of new issues in language and thinking. It is this revised perspective that will inspire the next generation of thinking and research on the way language affects thought." Herbert H. Clark, Department of Psychology, Stanford University



"Remember the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis -- the idea that the language you speak shapes the way you think? It's been pronounced dead a number of times in the past fifty years, and yet it just won't go away. To understand why not, read *Language in Mind*. There the leading scholars in the field take a fresh look at Sapir-Whorf and offer intriguing new evidence for it. But they do more than just revive the hypothesis. They rework it and give it a genuinely new shape as they show how it bears on a range of new issues in language and thinking. It is this revised perspective that will inspire the next generation of thinking and research on the way language affects thought."--Herbert H. Clark, Department of Psychology, Stanford University

About the Author

Dedre Gentner is Professor of Psychology and Education and Director of the Cognitive Science Program at Northwestern University.

Susan Goldin-Meadow is Professor of Psychology and an affiliate of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Chicago.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Robert Jones on February 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
The model (theory) of the world that an intelligence will form

depends upon the particular representation used by the learner.

(Machine Learning, Tom Mitchell, McGraw Hill, 1997, pgs 65-66)

While this is rigorously true for the learner's INTERNAL

representation (i.e. the language of thought) it will also

apply to NATURAL languages that the agent employs to the

degree that reasoning is performed in the natural language

and/or to the degree to which the natural language mirrors

the language of thought. This dependence of the learner's

understanding of the world on his language may help to

explain why translation between natural languages is so

difficult. Gentner and Goldin-Meadow's book does a good

job of discussing current research in this area.
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