Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $6.82 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by tuffystreasures
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: small cut in cover...stickers removed/torn from the inside cover...Ex-library with stamps/stickers...no writing/highlighting of text present
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia, and Beyond Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-0393332384 ISBN-10: 0393332381 Edition: 1st

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$21.13
$14.50 $1.11

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Language for a New Century: Contemporary Poetry from the Middle East, Asia, and Beyond + A Poetry Handbook
Price for both: $29.04

Buy the selected items together
  • A Poetry Handbook $7.91

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Sell Your Books
Get up to 75% back when you sell your books on Amazon. Ship your books for free and get Amazon.com Gift Cards. Learn more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 784 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1 edition (April 17, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393332381
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393332384
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #613,926 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. This ambitious yet accessible gathering of hundreds of poets from various parts of Asia, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, America and elsewhere is likely to excite poetry fans as well as those new to poetry. Seeking a response to 9/11, the three editors, who are poets and teachers of Asian-American descent, hoped to share an alternate vision of the new century in which words, not weapons, could define our civilization. Divided into nine idiosyncratic sections—with titles like Bowl of Air and Shivers that cover topics including Eros and the meeting of the political and the personal—the book is more an esoteric journey than a systematic reference. Readers may recognize the names of major international figures (Nazim Hikmet, Taha Muhammad Ali) and famous American writers (Michael Ondaatje, Li-Young Lee), who may draw attention to many writers unknown in the U.S., such as Hsien Min Toh of Singapore, who, upon seeing sport hunters shooting crows, awakens to an all-too-familiar ambivalence about my unkind nation, in whose name only I will be/ able to walk up the lane with lowered head. While the book's sheer size can be overwhelming, it is packed with treasures. (Apr.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

This monumental thematic anthology is like a crowded party of exceptionally brilliant people. At the end, you are dazed and dazzled, and everyone seems to run together in memory: the Chinese man who writes in his native ethnic tongue, the exiled Tibetan who lives in San Francisco, the persecuted Bangladeshi feminist, the emigrant from Turkmenistan who is now a prominent Swedish poet. Even a diligent reader of contemporary poetry will leave this gathering feeling humbled by ignorance of the immense poetic energy of what used to be called the East. The breadth of its sweep is both the anthology’s strength and its weakness, for hundreds of poets are represented by single poems. What the poems share is an almost aggressive modernity, for the poets are as easy in airports as in souks, as familiar with the Internet as with ancient myths, as conversant with subaltern theory as with the smell of mangoes in a bazaar. They share, too, a political consciousness and conscience, making this as impressive a collection of poets of witness as has ever been assembled. --Patricia Monaghan

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By matt horton on August 19, 2008
Format: Paperback
In this age of information, poetry is perhaps the most efficient method of expressing grand concepts. Language for a New Century, a collection of contemporary poetry from the Middle East, Asia (including parts of North and East Africa) and its Diaspora, contains one poetic masterpiece after another. Complete with humor, love, anger, despair, confusion, contempt, sadness and joy, the poems open a window into the experience of the world's most populous continent. Lovingly compiled by its editors, who are towering artists in their own right, this collection of 400 voices from the "East" is the culmination of six years of research and collaboration with thousands of people in the 55 countries from which the works are drawn.

The poems were carefully translated from their 40 original languages into English--many for the first time--by expert regional artists who have succeeded in expressing concepts and ideas often difficult to convey. The poems contained in this massive volume represent some of the best in their modern craft, and stand in stark contrast to the disposable monotony we slog through in our daily search for truth. Evocative and provocative, familiar and shocking, the poets pose questions more often than they make pronouncements. Eliciting thought and reflection, they challenge the consumer of "information" to instead become an information producer.

Arranged around nine themes related to the human experience, the structure of the book itself combats Orientalism with humanity. It defies borders, many artificial, many imposed, reconnecting regions in a continent where, prior to Western imperialism, war and the modern nation state, identities, ideas and people interacted more fluidly.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Joseph S. Maresca HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on July 25, 2008
Format: Paperback
The presentation gives a fairly complete rendition
of poetry from the Middle East and Asia. Renditions
from Azerbaijan, Turkey, India, Iran, Japan,
Palestine and Iceland are provided for the readers'
enjoyment. Tidbits of typical poems are provided
together with the applicable authors. i.e.

Jennifer Dobbys-Elesy wrote "Pure Music" which contains
the following passage:

" Child among night flowers , opening their dark eyes
to the moon , "

Hamid Ismailov wrote "The Shaping Clay" containing the
following passage:

"Crack open your door, silence to the murmurs of a
cottage under the cradle of the sleeping clay."

Kyimay Kaung wrote "Eskimo Paradise" containing the
following passage:

" Eskimo paradise is warm paradise of Bedouins cold-
my paradise. "
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Fairweatherassult on October 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
'World literature' -- what is that? It seems to mean, literature produced around the world. Apparently, universities have decided that this is somehow an original concept. Still, if anthologies such as this introduce poetry lovers to the broader spectrum of verse (albeit in the lingua franca of English), then the editors have done their job. It is only to our betterment that a thousand flowers bloom -- and indeed so much is what is gathered here.

But an anthology based on such a massive premise is bound to exceed its grasp. Culling top poetry from the four corners is a worthy challenge -- but the price of expanse is depth. What procedures were in place to decide who represents a 'Central American' author? Why were they selected, and others left out? Specialists of the region may certainly quibble about choices -- but the editors give us no clues as to what determined their choices.

Some of the choices, in fact, are bizarre. An American expat who lives in Japan is filed under 'Japanese' poetry. Huh? And many selections are guided by certain . . . well, I won't call them prejudices . . . but it's pretty apparent that poetry selections were based on which authors are receiving the most airplay right now. Ko Un, for example. Darwish. Tamada Chimako. No doubt, all three are excellent poets -- and the translations are decent. And these poets are very popular in their home language -- but they do provide certain thematic realities (sex, Buddhism, colonialism) that fit nicely into certain expectations of North American audiences.

See, the problem with these anthologies is that they become museums of stones: nice poems, translated, put on pedestals, with the headlamp glowing above.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Definitely a "must own" for any poet's, educator's, or student's bookshelf. Refreshing to read, chock-full of necessary and relevant voices, "Language For A New Century" is the most important anthology of our age. The ultimate source for a generation of voices, this carefully collected volume emphasizes the human experience and attempts to break down the barriers that have up to this point defined and claimed us. I love that rather than being divided into countries, or regions, the book is divided into life's regions - childhood, identity, politics, the erotic, etc., and this further pronounces the effervescent transcendence our own utterances desire to proclaim.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Search
ARRAY(0xa30103d8)