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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding introduction to linguistics ...
This is the best introduction to Chomsky's linguistics theory for the lay person. And everybody ought to know this much about human language!
Published 22 months ago by Reviews by

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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Chomsky explores Spanish morphemes
This book might be a useful exploration of Spanish morphemes, but Noam Chomsky is overly fond of his own theory, which is often violated by the examples.
Published 13 months ago by Steve Schunk


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding introduction to linguistics ..., April 24, 2013
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This review is from: Language and Problems of Knowledge: The Managua Lectures (Current Studies in Linguistics) (Perfect Paperback)
This is the best introduction to Chomsky's linguistics theory for the lay person. And everybody ought to know this much about human language!
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Chomsky explores Spanish morphemes, January 23, 2014
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This review is from: Language and Problems of Knowledge: The Managua Lectures (Current Studies in Linguistics) (Perfect Paperback)
This book might be a useful exploration of Spanish morphemes, but Noam Chomsky is overly fond of his own theory, which is often violated by the examples.
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4 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, May 9, 2004
By A Customer
Reasonably quick read. Restates language as a side-effect of the brain's syntaxial approach in expressing thought.
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1 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chomsky, May 7, 2010
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Prahanova "jrc" (MARIETTA, GA, US) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Language and Problems of Knowledge: The Managua Lectures (Current Studies in Linguistics) (Perfect Paperback)
Excellent speedy shipping and the book is outstanding. This book is to be part of the research for my Masters thesis. It is exciting and full of linguistic mini explosions. Linguistics is my passion!
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9 of 66 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Chomsky's not the Genius he's made out to be, August 11, 2003
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Jason B. (Twin Cities, MN) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Language and Problems of Knowledge: The Managua Lectures (Current Studies in Linguistics) (Perfect Paperback)
Noam Chomsky insists that the mind-body problem can't be solved or formulated and that theories of meaning remain unsuccessful. Apparently he still perpetuates the extraordinary ignorance of Aristotilian/Thomistic philosophy that he has previously been so accused along with the rest of modern philosophy.
For example, in Mortimer Adler's 1967 work of genius, "The Difference of Man and the Difference it Makes", Adler has this to say about the mind-body argument of Aristotle and Aquinas on p.223, "Because the moderate immaterialism of Aristotle and Aquinas is totally neglected or ignored in the contemporary discussion, we cannot look for criticisms of it, or objections to it, in current philosophical literature."
More explicitly, Adler has this to say in the notes on p.329 about theories of Meaning - "The Institute For Philosophical Research is currently engaged in the study of the whole discussion of language and thought and especially the problem of meaning. We have examined most of the major twentieth-century treatments of this subject. We have found only two contemporary writers who indicate some awareness of the correct version of the triadic theory of meaning, J.N. Findlay and R. Chisholm. Others among contemporaries who comment on the triadic theory are either unacquainted with the Aristotilian version or so misunderstand it that they treat that version and the Lockean version as if they were identical, Ogden and Richards. The rest manifest no awareness at all of the triadic theory in its correct version and, in addition, do not seem to understand the problem that it tried to solve and succeeded in solving." To my knowledge Descartes, Locke, Hobbes, Liebniz, Spinoza, Hume, Berkley, Kant and Comte are all on the list of ingorant as well.
My Recommendations are Mortimer Adler's books "The Difference of Man and The Difference it Makes" (1967), and "Some Questions About Language" (1976 - without question the best book ever written on the subject), and Jacques Maritain's "Degrees of Knowledge" (1959), and John Deely's "What Distinguishes Human Understanding?" (2002). Other geniuses like Etienne Gilson are to be read by anybody interested in learning about philosophy.
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Language and Problems of Knowledge: The Managua Lectures (Current Studies in Linguistics)
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