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Language, Proof and Logic Paperback – April 1, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-1575863740 ISBN-10: 157586374X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 598 pages
  • Publisher: CSLI Publications; 1st edition (April 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 157586374X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1575863740
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 1.7 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #515,487 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jon Barwise (1942-2000) was a mathematician, philosopher and logician. He taught at the Universities of Yale and Wisconsin before becoming the first director of the Center for the Study of Language and Information at Stanford University. From 1990 until his death he was professor of philosophy at Indiana University. John Etchemendy has been professor of philosophy at Stanford since 1983. In 2000 he became Provost of Stanford University.

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Customer Reviews

Overall, this is not a bad book.
Anthrowolfe
If you are only interested in book out of curiosity and not buying for a class, consider buying the book alone without the CD.
Lord Soth
I used this book in a distance learning course, so my experience was halfway between classroom and self-learning.
Tobias Bologna

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Anthrowolfe on October 25, 2009
Format: Paperback
Overall, this is not a bad book. In fact, I can see how it can be quite helpful for some. However, I must admit I'm not impressed by this book and would certainly not use it to teach a logic class.

Pro:
This book provides generous background information and explanation to the terms, concepts, rules, methods, etc. contained within. It also comes with a CD-Rom with helpufl information that guides you through the learning process. With this book, it is possible to submit your work to the "gradegrinder" grading service which will give you feedback on the submitted problems (Generally it tells you which line the mistake is made on or the type of mistake made.) It also uses a geometry based program which helps students understand what predicates are and how the function as variable modifiers. This can be quite helpful for the struggling student, students who do not self-check well, and (potentially) students with poor logic teachers. It covers sentential/propositional logic as well as predicate logic.

Con:
Having been exposed to other logic systems, most notibly that used by Allen and Hand in "Logic Primer." ( Logic Primer - 2nd Edition ) I find the system in LPL tedious, time consuming, and unnecessarily difficult. The logical operators were easier to read, to begin with. Most importantly, as one progressed through the text more derrived rules were available for use during proofs. (For people who are not familiar with logic, try to imagine making change with only pennies and ones. You can do it, but it is frustrating and hardly the fastest way. This is what the LPL book is like. "Logic Primer" is like having every denomination between pennies and twenties.
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69 of 82 people found the following review helpful By L. Friedland on February 28, 2003
Format: Paperback
I bought a used copy of the book and software at the beginning of the term, for a class. Now that we're starting it, I find out that a) we will be using the CD's software, including the online grading service, and therefore b) the copy I bought is useless to me.
The grading service records one email address (i.e. that of the previous owner) per book number. That email, necessary for submitting homework and for sending you the results, cannot ever be changed. In my case, it turns out the CD (which includes a .pdf copy of the textbook anyway) was the important part of the purchase . . . and will not work since it's been used before.
So be warned: don't buy the package used if you will need the software.
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25 of 30 people found the following review helpful By John F. Nordlinger on February 16, 2002
Format: Paperback
I was recommended this recently book while visiting my old Philosophy Advisor while in Boston. I've been hooked ever since! While for me it has been a great review of logic, the problems and ability to have them anonymously graded on the net is great fun! At the end of chapter 3 one is already versed well enough in logic to use the more complicated search engines with boolean operators. (altavista advanced for example). Being able to use sophisticated search engines will prove to be more and more valuable and this book offers so much more.
Along with a rich and entertaining text, you get a (WindowsXP friendly) CD including four software applications: (Tarski's world, Fitch, Boole and Submit) all with the goal of making logic more interactive.
Tarksi's world offers a view of 3D geometric objects in which one is required to make true, then valid and eventually sound conclusions.
Fitch is a tool that lets one build FOL (First Order Logic) Proofs.
Boole is a truth table tool.
All applications compliment each other and are suppoted by Submit on the client side and Grade Grinder on the Server Side. So that one is never left too long without some feedback on whether or not the section has been understood.
The books website offers additional tips and hints.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Grue on October 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
Stanford uses this book in its two introductory philosophy classes (philosophy 57 and phil 159). It is appropriate for students without much exposure to math or computer science, as it is very verbose--much more so than Enderton's _Mathematical Logic_ for example.
Students found the software initially frustrating, and the instructor interface can also be harder to use than it should be, but in the end it is worth it. I handed out a survey at the end of one course and the students generally thought the software was helpful and shouldn't be omitted. Showing the students what to do can be helpful. I just took part of a class period and went through (using laptop+projector) installing the software, building a world, writing a sentence, submitting a few exercises, and getting feeback by email.
Oh, and even if the software [was bad], instructors w/o TAs would probably still love it, as 2/3rds of the exercises can be graded automatically.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tobias Bologna on February 21, 2007
Format: Paperback
I used this book in a distance learning course, so my experience was halfway between classroom and self-learning. There were moments when the instructor's very helpful remarks made a big difference by placing the immediate subject in a larger context or by giving me a hint for an especially tough proof. But the book itself is so well-paced that I'm convinced one can work one's way through it alone and get most of the benefit. The software is the key, because (if you get the latest edition and buy it new!) you have unlimited access to the Grade Grinder servers. No one need know how many typos or missteps you make in your proofs! Every problem can be solved, sooner or later, if you interact with the automatic grader. The writing style, level of editing, and succinctness of explanations are superb. I found the book plus its software quite a painless way to learn first-order logic.
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