Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Lark Rise to Candleford: Season 3
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Thanks to a friend who lives in England, I was able to watch Season 3 of LRtC a couple of months ago, but I have been patiently awaiting the DVD release here in the United States (it took them long enough!). I have been a faithful fan of LRtC since Season One and just love this period drama centered on the inhabitants of the hamlet of Lark Rise and the town of Candleford. The casting is excellent, with a talented ensemble cast who add real depth to the characters portrayed, the stories are generally interesting with real human drama with all the pains and joys experienced by the inhabitants of Lark Rise and Candleford, and the cinematography is simply breathtaking.

Season Three sees the introduction of a significant new character, Daniel Parrish (played by Ben Aldridge), a young journalist who arrives in Lark Rise with some life-altering news for the Timmins. Emma (Claudie Blakley) might inherit a fortune, and both Emma and her husband Robert (Brendan Coyle) ponder the possibilities and opportunities this signifies for them as a family. Parrish is also drawn to Laura Timmins (Olivia Hallinan) who has matured into a true beauty, but still harbors heartache from the break-up with clockmaker Fisher Price in Season 2.

The independent and strong-willed Dorcas Lane (played by the talented and lovely Julia Sawalha) continues as Candleford's postmistress, and experiences some human drama of her own, taking on a role that she finds fulfills her immensely. Unlike previous seasons, Dorcas' story is no longer the only dominant thread this season, as other characters begin to get more screen time (yes, I was not too pleased with this, but I felt some of these stories were still well done). One story arc which I particularly enjoyed watching was the marital adventures of postman Thomas Brown (Mark Heap) and his devoted wife Margaret Ellison (Sandy McDade). Their antics just make me laugh out loud, and yet there is also a poignancy to their marriage which is explored later in the season. This balance makes them an interesting couple to watch on-screen and the actors outdo themselves in lending credibility and depth to their characters.

Minnie, the bumbling yet lovable maid from Season 2 is given a meatier role this season, and I loved how Dorcas takes Minnie under her wing, grooming her not for a life of servitude but for something far more worthy and fulfilling, with mixed results - a blend of hilarity and poignancy that had me laughing one moment and tearing up the next.

Strong and resilient Emma Timmins also gets a chance to explore other sides to her role - she is not just a loving mother and loyal wife this season, but yearns to be something more which I felt rounded-out her character very nicely this season. One of the story arcs I've loved throughout seasons 1-3 is the strong bond of love between Robert and Emma Timmins, one which is further explored this season.

The Pratt sisters, Ruby and Pearl (Victoria Hamilton and Matilda Zeigler) continue their roles as town busybodies and this season sees a major upheaval which threatens the sisters formerly close knit bond with each other. Young Alf Arless (John Dagliesh, also one of my favorite characters after Dorcas and Robert) begins to mature into his role as the head of his family, assuming real responsibilities, but also faces some serious and heartbreaking challenges.

This season also sees the inhabitants of Lark Rise and Candleford coming together in times of crisis, helping each other out, and setting aside their differences which I felt was timely and touching. The stories make you feel like you're there, experiencing these people's joys and pains, their triumphs and failures, and the slowly developing sense of community between both hamlets.

There are many other story threads this season that will engage viewers and keep them riveted to the screen. Is Season Three as good as Seasons 1 & 2? Well, on some counts yes, and others no, but the talented ensemble cast puts together another charming and poignant season to please viewers in general. I only hope Season 4 is a reality and that BBC continues making this wonderful period drama!
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TOP 50 REVIEWERon August 9, 2010
This masterful Victorian Britain series has equaled, or bettered, "Little House on the Prairie." English country life at a poetic, pictorial, and enchanting peak. Lives of those living in Lark Rise and Candleford mingle as delicately and wonderfully as frosting on a bridal cake. Even the DVD's music puts a sanguine sugarcoating on the period.
4 DVDs, 12 episodes, about 12 hours, all 1800s awesome. Subtitled. It is romance, nostalgia, saga, suspense, drama, well...it's a cornucopia of viewing that is not to be missed. Especially for the folks who have already sat through seasons 1 & 2, it continues with a great and large nucleus cast, but the stories and depth of characters are growing with the show's movement.

Julia Sawalha (`Return to Cranford') as Dorcas continues as a major player, the postmistress of Candleford, but how long can she keep the postal position? Claudie Blakley (also of `Return to Cranford') as Emma, work well together, both with female roles that show a modern worthiness of women, but without hurting the period setting of the series. Her devoted husband, Robert (Brendan Coyle) delightful marriage interaction between the two, gives way from some of the Timmins family emphasis, to the advancement of Emma. Even though the show offers these 21 century tendencies, it harms nothing of the charm and warmth of a perfection of Victorian set, costume, and attitude that this show, now in year 3 has become known for. Jane Austin would have loved this show. And Catherine Cookson too, although most of Lark Rise and Candleford are less brutal than the commoners and towns of Cookson's adapted works.

Journalist, Daniel Parish (Ben Aldridge) arrives in town which leads to several situations for locals. Viewers will confront measles, witchcraft, bribes, pregnancy, beggars to inheritants, romance, rivalries, and multiple job-insecurity issues. Life. Life as we see now, and life in the 1880s. Amazing writing. Riveting dialogue.

Also, be warned. Expect belly laughs too. Those Pratt sisters, Twister (OK tears too) and wife, Queenie, not to mention, Thomas the Bible-quoting, bike-riding, mail-deliverer, and his wife, Margaret (all returning regulars) could put together a comedy show every bit as good as this dramatic series has been--from day one. There is an abundance of fine British dramatic programming available, but this has to be one of my favorite.

It's very comparable to "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" in that it is a continuing family struggle 1800s adventure, and hopefully the lady postmistress will survive as long as the lady doctor did. The end of episode 12 does lend itself to continuation, thankfully. I do SO RECOMMEND "Lark Rise to Candleford" series 1 and 2 as well. It is all fantastic 5-star good.
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I have been a faithful fan of LRtC since Season One and just love this period drama centered on the inhabitants of the hamlet of Lark Rise and the town of Candleford. The casting is excellent, with a talented ensemble cast who add real depth to the characters portrayed, the stories are generally interesting with real human drama with all the pains and joys experienced by the inhabitants of Lark Rise and Candleford, and the cinematography is simply breathtaking.

Season Three of Lark Rise to Candleford sees the introduction of a significant new character, Daniel Parrish (played by Ben Aldridge), a young journalist who arrives in Lark Rise with some life-altering news for the Timmins. Emma (Claudie Blakley) might inherit a fortune, and both Emma and her husband Robert (Brendan Coyle) ponder the possibilities and opportunities this signifies for them as a family. Parrish is also drawn to Laura Timmins (Olivia Hallinan) who has matured into a true beauty, but still harbors heartache from the break-up with clockmaker Fisher Price in Season 2.

The independent and strong-willed Dorcas Lane (played by the talented and lovely Julia Sawalha) continues as Candleford's postmistress, and experiences some human drama of her own, taking on a role that she finds fulfills her immensely. Unlike previous seasons, Dorcas' story is no longer the only dominant thread this season, as other characters begin to get more screen time (yes, I was not too pleased with this, but I felt some of these stories were still well done). One story arc which I particularly enjoyed watching was the marital adventures of postman Thomas Brown (Mark Heap) and his devoted wife Margaret Ellison (Sandy McDade). Their antics just make me laugh out loud, and yet there is also a poignancy to their marriage which is explored later in the season. This balance makes them an interesting couple to watch on-screen and the actors outdo themselves in lending credibility and depth to their characters.

Minnie, the bumbling yet lovable maid from Season 2 is given a meatier role this season, and I loved how Dorcas takes Minnie under her wing, grooming her not for a life of servitude but for something far more worthy and fulfilling, with mixed results - a blend of hilarity and poignancy that had me laughing one moment and tearing up the next.

Strong and resilient Emma Timmins also gets a chance to explore other sides to her role - she is not just a loving mother and loyal wife this season, but yearns to be something more which I felt rounded-out her character very nicely this season. One of the story arcs I've loved throughout seasons 1-3 is the strong bond of love between Robert and Emma Timmins, one which is further explored this season.

The Pratt sisters, Ruby and Pearl (Victoria Hamilton and Matilda Zeigler) continue their roles as town busybodies and this season sees a major upheaval which threatens the sisters formerly close knit bond with each other. Young Alf Arless (John Dagliesh, also one of my favorite characters after Dorcas and Robert) begins to mature into his role as the head of his family, assuming real responsibilities, but also faces some serious and heartbreaking challenges.

This season also sees the inhabitants of Lark Rise and Candleford coming together in times of crisis, helping each other out, and setting aside their differences which I felt was timely and touching. The stories make you feel like you're there, experiencing these people's joys and pains, their triumphs and failures, and the slowly developing sense of community between both hamlets.

There are many other story threads this season that will engage viewers and keep them riveted to the screen. Is Season Three as good as Seasons 1 & 2? Well, on some counts yes, and others no, but the talented ensemble cast puts together another charming and poignant season to please viewers in general.
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on September 12, 2010
I love the series overall, but, though the individual stories are quite good, BBC's third season budget cuts show -- in too many episodes, major characters are 'out of town' so as to save the pence for hiring that actor for that episode. To me the third series was therefore not quite as rich as the first two, but still well worth seeing, and heads above the usual TV rubbish.
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Today I got Season Three of Lark Rose to Candleford. I laughed out loud and a few minutes had tears in my eyes. The stories haven't lost any of their charm. This is a really pleasant series. It reminds me of what life must have been like in our own small towns 100 years or so ago.

I also have Season Four. My only problem is that I can't stop watching them. It just isn't possible to watch them all in one sitting, but I would if I could. Then I could go on to see what happens next season.

I really recommend that you watch the seasons in order if possible. You care about the people more that way because of the experiences we've shared with them.
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on February 24, 2015
Love my BBC/Masterpiece/PBS period pieces while I'm quietly knitting in the evenings here in Southern California. The theme music puts my dogs in such a peaceful happy place in their dog beds beside me. I get to visit the Lark Rise and Candleford characters as old friends by the 3rd season with their wholesome, picturesque lifestyles. Too bad Brendan Coyle left for Downton Abby but we LOVE that series too. I just wish Lark Rise season 4 was also available on Prime ticket or download. I have to order the DVD and now waiting for it's arrival. :(
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on May 8, 2016
Lark Rise to Candleford is an excellent BBC series that depicts life in the small villages in the countryside near Oxford near the close of the 19th Century. It was a transitional era for both the aristocratic and land controlling gentry were confronted with technological and social transformation, and the changing roles of the poor tenant farmers and craftspeople who struggle to make a living. At the heart of the story are the two villages--Lark Rise and Candlford. Lark Rise is a poor village, simply houses for tenants who work the fields and do the crafts, often facing the critical day of paying the rent. Candleford is the small village with emerging commerce, a hotel, a newspaper, a post office, a dress shop. The characters of Dorcas, Laura, Queenie, Twister, Daniel, among many others become memorable. Also emerging is the changing role of women, of strong women, at the start of the societal transformation into the 20th Century. Lark Rise to Candleford tells human stories with humor and sensitivity in much the same way that the BBC production of Downton Abbey continues the transformations in the 20th Century.
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on May 5, 2016
I enjoy this study of community and believable residents living. It concentrates on the people as they relate to each other,the land, and the time of the late 1800's. There is love interest throughout the daily lives of multiple ages and positions. The post office is the cog to the many relationships of the community. In those days the mail was delivered twice a day and it center role emphasizes communication unfolds. As the season enfolds we see the development of the individuals as they face the burgeoning industrialization of a beautiful bucolic thatched roof 'wee' cottage village and the larger community nearby.I confess I binged watched it and am now allowing myself only one at a time as I finish this season. I calmed myself as i realized i can watch all again and watch for details of this community built on communication if the hearts that LIVE there.
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on April 27, 2016
Loved this series! This review is on the whole series, not just season 3. I was sad when I got to the last episode. The characters are believable, with excellent acting. I found some scenes to be a little out of time; the displays of affection (kissing) and unchaperoned meetings between two people of the opposite sex seemed not accurate for that time period. I adored all of the spunky, outspoken women. The humor was subtle, usually just an expression on a character's face, but enough to make me laugh. Some of my favorites are Ruth Pratt, for her expressions, Queenie, for her wisdom and attitude on life, and Dorcas, for her ability to poke subtle fun at herself. Characters I found a bit annoying: self-righteous Thomas Brown, and childish Twister. Now I am floundering around the amazon videos, trying to find something just as good. No luck, so far.
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Season one of Lark Rise was splendid. Season two was very good, but I felt it was not quite up to season one. Now that I have finished season three, I must say that this is my favorite and what I consider the best season so far.

In this stately period drama (using the word drama loosely because this is as far from melodrama as the word drama can be), we continue to glimpse into the lives of the families of these two towns in the late 19th century Britain. This series continues to impress me with the authentic story telling of these families. On the one side, you have Lark Rise, a simple farming hamlet. On the other side is Candleford, an up and coming town with a population tuned in to the affairs of the world at large.

In season three we see the Golden Lion Hotel flourishing. One recurring guest star opens up a newspaper in Candleford. But despite these changes, life mainly proceeds as it has. People still have their interactions, their misunderstandings, quarrels, and tiffs. But they also have camaraderie and spirit. This is so well portrayed when measles strikes Lark Rise and the folks of Candleford come to help their neighbors.

The actors are magnificent in their portrayals of these characters. The people haven't changed too much. Their personalities are very well thought out. I also enjoy that in this show a scandal involves something such as a woman wearing pants instead of a skirt. This isn't the type of television one usually sees (people having relations all over the place, illegitimate kids, murders, etc...) Instead, it is a tragic and shocking event when a person is sent to the debtors prison. Even the story of a homeless wanderer catches the interest of the local paper and even the London papers.

The series is slow, stately, and well written and well acted. I have enjoyed all three seasons so far and plan on enjoying season four (which is the final season so far - though there is a major uproar in Britain for a new series (season) five). I highly recommend this series to fans of Downton Abbey or Cranford.
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