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194 of 204 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars really, this is the perfect gift
I got into the "Millenium Trilogy" kind of late, so having this boxset was perfect for catching up on Stieg Larsson's literary phenomenon. I enjoyed the characters(how can you NOT love Lisbeth Salander?!), and the plot was intriguing and challenging too.

Now, on to the 'deluxe boxed set' itself. The three books(plus one collection of essays,etc.) are housed...
Published on December 2, 2010 by bOoKwOrM

versus
51 of 60 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Books are excelent, but the manufacturer's packaging is not
I love the Millennium Trilogy of books which is why I chose to purchase this box set despite owning all three books already in UK/International paperback publications. Unfortunately the manufacturer's packaging on this set is severely deficient. I received 2 copies of this from Amazon, the decorative boxes for both copies were ruined by the manufacturer's packaging...
Published on January 3, 2011 by Hayden C Olenik


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194 of 204 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars really, this is the perfect gift, December 2, 2010
I got into the "Millenium Trilogy" kind of late, so having this boxset was perfect for catching up on Stieg Larsson's literary phenomenon. I enjoyed the characters(how can you NOT love Lisbeth Salander?!), and the plot was intriguing and challenging too.

Now, on to the 'deluxe boxed set' itself. The three books(plus one collection of essays,etc.) are housed in a sturdy cardboard case. The case itself is very well made and over the glossy black color there are three golden symbols(a dragon, a hornet, and a fire). You have to see the boxset in person to appreciate how cool it looks.

The books themselves are different from the previous hardcover releases. First of all, the dust jacket covers are gone now. Instead you get them in clothbound form, with cool designs stamped in red(book 1), black(book 2), and dark blue(book 3). It all looks very cool, and I honestly prefer it over the previous releases. The books have the uneven 'deckle' edges, even the fourth volume.

So, if you have all previous hardcovers, there might not be enough here to 'upgrade' your collection. But if all you have are the softcover books(or even if you're an uninitiated newbie to Stieg Larsson's work and haven't read a single word of the "Millenium Trilogy"), then this box set is the thing to get.
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155 of 164 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Moral Tale?, May 25, 2010
By 
Mike Fazey (Perth, Western Australia) - See all my reviews
Like millions of people worldwide, I was absolutely captivated by these three books and their strange and utterly unconventional anti-heroine, Lisbeth Salander. That Larsson manages to evoke such sympathy for her, despite her anti-social nature and penchant for violence, is quite remarkable. Of course, we might feel differently if not for the monumental injustices she has suffered at the hands of a few corrupt individuals. She is a victim who has responded to her situation by becoming an outsider.

The story is certainly an intricate one, but Larsson manages to lead us through the maze without losing us along the way. In fact, one of the joys of the books is gradually realising that there are yet more levels of complexity to get your head around.

Thrilling as the storyline is, the thing I found most interesting about it was the moral dimension. Corruption in business and in government and the abuse of women are major themes, and Larsson's position on them is crystal clear. However, both Salander herself and the crusading journalist Blomqvist also act outside the law. This gives a certain moral ambiguity to the story. In Salander's case, her illegal acts take place within her own moral code - a code that is internally consistent but at odds with what we would ordinarily consider to be acceptable. In Blomqvist's case, his acts (including turning a blind eye to Salander's computer crimes) are informed by a desire to expose corruption and to achieve justice for Salander.

So, given Salander's understandable antipathy towards the society that has treated her so appallingly, and Blomqvist's laudable social justice objectives, is their own behaviour morally acceptable? Do the ends justify the means? Are the circumstances so extreme that ordinary moral arguments don't apply? These are the questions that remained with me after I'd finished the final book, and still remain.

Ultimately, this is what makes the Millennium Trilogy something more than your average crime thriller and worth investing the time and mental energy to read.
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71 of 73 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Graphic, Devious, and Enthralling, December 20, 2011
By 
Mikey B. (Kittanning, Pennsylvania) - See all my reviews
This series was amazingly captivating once one gets beyond the about the first four chapters of the first book. The reader meets Lisbeth and is immediately inclined to dislike her, however, once we become more acquainted with her, we realize that there is more to her than her appearance. I warn those with weak constitutions that this series is very graphic and does treats many social taboos as common place. Upon beginning the first book, it can seem boring and meticulous in it's detail, however, I can't stress this enough...KEEP READING! It keeps getting better and more devious as you continue. There are a few sections of these books that are sexual and violent to the extremes of the terms, however, they have purpose as they act to illustrate certain aspects of the characters and their stories. The mysteries of all three keep one turning the pages to find out what happens next, especially the ending of the second book. Before the complete edition came into being I had to buy each book separately...by the end of the second book It was somewhere around two in the morning and I had to buy the third one and begin reading it before I could allow myself to go to bed. All in all the books are extremely well written and keep you guessing until the very end. My only qualm with the series is the abundance of Swedish jargon that can be confusing at times, especially the currency that is meaningless in the beginning unless one has a complete knowledge of the currency conversions. (more power to you)
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84 of 92 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The girl in a bleak world, May 25, 2010
Authors who are only published posthumously rarely get the attention they deserve', or any attention at all. Fortunately, such is not the case with the late Stieg Larsson's bestselling Millennium trilogy -- it starts off slow, and soon winds itself into a tight knot of tautly-written thriller and mystery elements. It's raw, bleak, intensely disturbing noir.

In "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo," take-no-prisoners journalist Mikael Blomkvist has just lost his reputation, his savings and his freedom (hello, jail sentence!) after a nasty libel suit from an executive named Wennerström.

Then he's unexpectedly contacted by aged industrialist Henrik Vanger, to discover what happened to the guy's grandniece. He's offering evidence on Wennerström, so Mikael has no choice but to accept -- and as he investigates the sinister Vanger family, he joins forces with Lisbeth Salander, an eccentric, abused computer hacker. And as Mikael unearths the clues to Harriet's disappearance, he also finds some skeletons long kept buried.

"The Girl Who Played With Fire" finds Mikael investigating sex trafficking in his own country, and young girls who are sold into it. Unknown to him, Lisbeth is keeping very close tabs on his work -- especially since she was abused as a child, and now plots revenge on the sex traffickers. But when she's accused of murder and ends up on the run, Mikael must discover what lies at the core of these crimes...

And finally, "The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets' Nest" takes place directly after the second book. Lisbeth has been shot in the head, her malevolent father Zalachenko is in the same hospital claiming that she tried to kill him, and some nasty government forces want her locked away, as she was as a child. Her only hope lies in Mikael, who must unravel a government conspiracy formed around the young hacker...

Larsson's books are a unique blend of old and new -- he takes the usual mystery/thriller tropes (locked room mystery, government conspiracies) and enfolds it in a ruthless, blistering look at modern Swedish society and sexual aggression. It's a dark, dangerous, unfair world where the truth is quashed, powerful forces conspire against individuals, and women are treated horribly -- usually shown via the eccentric, punky "girl with the dragon tattoo."

His prose is rather bleak and often quite gritty, and a certain brand of understated passion shines through -- the kind that feels the need to express itself even though it takes place in fiction. And while most of the first book focuses in Mikael, in the second and third Larssen's style splits in half -- one half is the more staid, ordinary perspective of Mikael and others, and the other half is the wild nihilism of Lisbeth ("If death was the black emptiness from which she had just woken up, then death was nothing to worry about. She would hardly notice the difference").

Mikael and Salander make an intriguing odd couple. He starts world-weary and demoralized that he seems to care about nothing, but regains his passion for the truth; the only downside is that he's a bit Marty Stuish, since all women seem to adore him. And Salander is a mass of hurts and quirks -- she's a vibrant, wild genius who lashes out at those who hurt women, and has been constantly tortured by those around her since childhood (even as an adult, she's forced to have a legal guardian).

Take your average thriller/mysteries, smother them in disillusioned, morally-bankrupt noir... and you'll have something like the Millennium Trilogy. A hard read, but worth the journey.
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful yet costly set, December 13, 2010
I'm a great fan of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy and already own his works in hardcover. I knew of this set because my friend (an avid fan of Larsson's works) owns it (purchased online). However, I decided to purchase the other deluxe boxed set instead as it is more cost effective. The differences between the two sets are as follows:

The publisher for this set is Maclehose Press, London (2010). This set consists of four volumes, and besides being more expensive, the major difference between this set and the other slip-cased set is that this set has a poster of 16 different dust jackets of the trilogy published around the world. Each book in this slip-cased set has gilt titles on the spine, and a gilt dragon on the front boards.

The other slip-cased set (which I purchased) consists of four books in a beautiful slip-case. The four books are The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played With Fire, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, and On Stieg Larsson. The three novels are cloth bound (no dust jacket) and have beautiful, unique engravings on each. There are also unique features such as maps and full-color endpapers. The book titled On Stieg Larsson consists of essays which have never been published before as well as correspondence with Larsson who died in 2004.
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51 of 60 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Books are excelent, but the manufacturer's packaging is not, January 3, 2011
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I love the Millennium Trilogy of books which is why I chose to purchase this box set despite owning all three books already in UK/International paperback publications. Unfortunately the manufacturer's packaging on this set is severely deficient. I received 2 copies of this from Amazon, the decorative boxes for both copies were ruined by the manufacturer's packaging techniques. The decorative box is oversized for the books (about 1/8-1/4 inch wider inside than the book covers) and the manufacturer shrink-wraps the books into the box, crushing the corners of the box where they are pulled in against empty space. Simply removing the shrink wrap from one of sets revealed several tears in the box, including a 2-3" long tear on the top left corner. Both sets (the original purchase and the replacement Amazon sent when I reported the damage) are on their way back to Amazon and I will be waiting for them to resolve this issue, as the sets in my local bookstores (Amazon, Barnes & Noble) do not seem to have this problem. I would advise holding off on purchasing this set until Amazon can sort out their problems with the publisher's packing methods.
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26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful slipcased set for collectors and fans of good crime fiction, December 13, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I'm a great fan of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy and already own his works in hardcover. When I saw this set though, I knew I had to have it because I'm also a collector of books, and this set seemed worth having with all the special features.

The set consists of four books in a beautiful slip-case. The four books are The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played With Fire, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest, and On Stieg Larsson. The three novels are cloth bound (no dust jacket) and have beautiful, unique engravings on each. There are also unique features such as maps and full-color endpapers. The book titled On Stieg Larsson consists of essays which have never been published before as well as correspondence with Larsson who died in 2004.

Just a note: There is another collector's set which is not to be confused with this. The publisher is Maclehose Press, London (2010). It is a more expensive edition than this (also contains 4 volumes), and the major difference between this set and the other set is that the other set has a poster of 16 different dustjackets of the trilogy published around the world. Each book in the other slipcased set has gilt titles on the spine, and a gilt dragon on the front boards. I knew of this set because my friend (an avid fan of Larsson's works) owns it (purchased online).

However, I decided to purchase this set instead as the other set is much more expensive. I think this set, for the price, offers good value for collectors and fans of great crime fiction.
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38 of 45 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Exactly a Masterpiece, but. . ., June 25, 2010
By 
Gene Miyakawa (Philadelphia, PA, US) - See all my reviews
If I were to have read the Girl-Who trilogy while being completely unaware of all the media hype and public accolades, would I say that these books are good? Yes. Are they masterpieces? No. Would I recommend them to my fellow readers? Yes. Would I recommend them to my fellow writers? No.

All three books contain moments of magnificent originality and creativity. The multiple storylines offer unpredictable yet completely believable turns of events, the scope of which reaches a near-epic level. Yet, taken as a whole, the books fall far short of what qualifies them as magnum opus of their genre.

The books' biggest flaw, if I may be allowed to point out, is the sheer amount of material that has virtually no bearing on the storylines themselves. Each book goes to great and painstaking length on passages of events that are of no or little consequence or relevance. Granted, every work of fiction has extraneous parts that can be cut and won't affect the plot, but they are only kept in to *enhance* the story. In the case of the Girl-Who trilogy, they simply *overwhelm* it. They inflate and, in the process, dilute the main premises of the books. It is as if these books never had the benefit of a book editor.

It is said here, and I swear by it, that the three books can easily be condensed into one book, albeit a long one. It is further stated that the trilogy never should have been published in its present form. Sounds outrageous, even blasphemous, I know, given the world-renowned status they have achieved. Nonetheless, the quality of a book cannot be judged by the number of copies it sells. The Girl-Who trilogy *is* a phenomenal achievement by a rookie novelist, albeit a dead one, but it contains way too many flaws and errors to merit a five-star rating. Or four, for that matter.
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40 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The girl in the bloody thriller, November 26, 2010
Authors who are only published posthumously rarely get the attention they deserve', or any attention at all. Fortunately, such is not the case with the late Stieg Larsson's bestselling Millennium trilogy -- it starts off slow, and soon winds itself into a tight knot of tautly-written thriller and mystery elements. It's raw, bleak, intensely disturbing noir.

In "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo," take-no-prisoners journalist Mikael Blomkvist has just lost his reputation, his savings and his freedom (hello, jail sentence!) after a nasty libel suit from an executive named Wennerström.

Then he's unexpectedly contacted by aged industrialist Henrik Vanger, to discover what happened to the guy's grandniece. He's offering evidence on Wennerström, so Mikael has no choice but to accept -- and as he investigates the sinister Vanger family, he joins forces with Lisbeth Salander, an eccentric, abused computer hacker. And as Mikael unearths the clues to Harriet's disappearance, he also finds some skeletons long kept buried.

"The Girl Who Played With Fire" finds Mikael investigating sex trafficking in his own country, and young girls who are sold into it. Unknown to him, Lisbeth is keeping very close tabs on his work -- especially since she was abused as a child, and now plots revenge on the sex traffickers. But when she's accused of murder and ends up on the run, Mikael must discover what lies at the core of these crimes...

"The Girl Who Kicked The Hornets' Nest" takes place directly after the second book. Lisbeth has been shot in the head, her malevolent dad Zalachenko is in the same hospital, and some nasty government forces want her locked away, as she was as a child. Her only hope lies in Mikael, who must unravel a government conspiracy formed around the young hacker...

Finally, "On Stieg Larsson" is a solid accompaniment to this trilogy -- it's a nonfiction book that compiles four essays about him along with his email exchanges with his editor. Reading his own viewpoints on his characters and books really shines a spotlight on different facets of their stories, and why he wrote them the way he did.

Larsson's books are a unique blend of old and new -- he takes the usual mystery/thriller tropes (locked room mystery, government conspiracies) and enfolds it in a ruthless, blistering look at modern Swedish society and sexual aggression. It's a dark, dangerous, unfair world where the truth is quashed, powerful forces conspire against individuals, and women are treated horribly -- usually shown via the eccentric, punky "girl with the dragon tattoo."

His prose is rather bleak and often quite gritty, and a certain brand of understated passion shines through -- the kind that feels the need to express itself even though it takes place in fiction. And while most of the first book focuses in Mikael, in the second and third Larssen's style splits in half -- one half is the more staid, ordinary perspective of Mikael and others, and the other half is the wild nihilism of Lisbeth ("If death was the black emptiness from which she had just woken up, then death was nothing to worry about. She would hardly notice the difference").

Mikael and Salander make an intriguing odd couple. He starts world-weary and demoralized that he seems to care about nothing, but regains his passion for the truth; the only downside is that he's a bit Marty Stuish, since all women seem to adore him. And Salander is a mass of hurts and quirks -- she's a vibrant, wild genius who lashes out at those who hurt women, and has been constantly tortured by those around her since childhood (even as an adult, she's forced to have a legal guardian).

Take your average thriller/mysteries, smother them in disillusioned, morally-bankrupt noir... and you'll have something like the Millennium Trilogy. A hard read, but worth the journey.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Bundle for an Addicting Trilogy, December 29, 2011
If you want a quick way to get up to speed on Stieg Larrson's addicting trilogy, this bundle is the way to read it. At first, it may start off slow, but once you meet the amazingly intriguing girl, the story takes off. It's a crime thriller that keeps you guessing throughout until the very end. Some parts are graphically violent and sexual so be forewarned, but they are used to show the characteristics of certain people. You can't have a crime mystery without criminals can you? Very addicting. These books kept me reading until the early morning and I can't stop. The only other books that has the same style of writing to The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo as far as build up, characters and having twists and turns to the end are books by Kailin Gow, but with more romance, James Patterson, and Stephen King. James Patterson writes mystery thrillers, Stephen King writes horror, and Kailin Gow writes young adult fantasy, but they all have that skilled plotting mastery that Stieg Larsson has demonstrated through The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
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