Customer Reviews

160
3.8 out of 5 stars
Lasers
Format: Audio CDChange
Price:$11.99 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-10 of 25 reviews (3 star)show all reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on March 27, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Lupe Fiasco always got more flak than he deserves. Underground hip-hop fans view Lupe as ersatz Mos Def and Talib Kweli, rather than appreciating his unique gifts. Meanwhile, mainstream listeners never got over the "skateboard rapper" stigma that followed Lupe after "Kick, Push" hit the airwaves, and ignored him over the gaudy mindlessness of "Gucci Mane" and "Wakka Flocka Flame". But one only needs to hear tracks like "Hurt Me Soul", "American Terrorist" or "Little Weapon" to witness Lupe's thematic flexibility and multi-layered lyricism that puts many modern rappers to shame (especially the overplayed Drake and Nicki Minaj). Lupe's 'Food & Liquor' continued where Kanye West's "The College Dropout" left off, and is arguably one the best rap albums of the last decade.

For `Lasers', Lupe confronts yet another critic deriding him for being too deep: his label, Atlantic Records. Unfortunately, they have more influence than the disgruntled rap fan expecting club hits. Despite the combined 7 Grammy nominations 'Food & Liquor' (2006) and 'The Cool' (2008) received, the lack of #1 singles disappointed Atlantic, and they urged Lupe to go for mass appeal. Translation: don't be very thought provoking, or "too lyrical", as Soulja Boi insultingly stated about Lupe on Vibe magazine. Well congratulations! You guys got your insipid wish.

Listening through 'Lasers', it's easy to tell where Lupe's persona strains to break through Atlantic's corporate compromise. Singles "Till I Get There" and "Break the Chain" has Lupe complacently uttering half-hearted announcements about his drive to reach a better future. The production replaces the immersive tunes that supplemented Lupe's lyrics before, and instead goes for generic sounds and choruses that hardly differ from the usual radio fare. A few songs go for dance song tempo (again, "Break the Chain"), or for the sports anthem ("The Show Goes On"; big surprise it's now played on ESPN/NCAA promos). As aspirations for pop recognition rises, Lupe's identity slips.

Take "Words I Never Said", featuring Skylar Green. It's going for the appeal of the Eminem/Rihanna duet, "Love the Way You Lie" - Skylar even sounds like a Rihanna expy - but going that route drowns out Lupe's thoughtful lyrics to the catchier, more banal chorus given by the singer. It's a big reason I loathed "Love the Way You Lie" (a weak track in Eminem's otherwise solid 'Recovery'). Adding to insult is Lupe's voice being auto-tuned through the ordeal (thanks, T-Pain).

And then some tracks appear with conflicting guest stars. Trey Songz's lady chasing lyrics clash against Lupe's more chaste opinion towards his female listeners. Meanwhile, when John Legend comes into the album closer "Never Forget You", the result is...peculiar. Before this, never would have I compared Legend to Coldplay frontman Chris Martin. No offense to either artist - I've enjoyed works from both - but like much of 'Lasers', the inclusion feels awkward.

And yet, in spite of Atlantic's meddling, 'Lasers' isn't as terrible as it should be. Listeners can still hear Lupe's sociopolitical commentary sprinkled throughout the album. On "Words I Never Said", Lupe attacks mainstream news stations for being flat-out racist (Fox News) or too focused on gossip fodder (CNN), while giving Obama and politicians a big thumbs down. With "The Show Goes On" and parts of "Beautiful Lasers", Lupe raises the spirits of troubled youth who want to escape inner city confinement, while ridiculing everyone who wants to suppress them into a predictable box. "State Run Radio" takes a deserved shot at commercial radio, ringtone rappers, and the corporate machine that fuels the existence of both. In "All Black Everything," Lupe envisions a black America that avoided the chronic suffering that trailed them after being freed, post-Civil War. Too bad that's the sole example of Lupe really going abstract.

Because of 'Lasers' being reduced to a dozen tracks, and because much of Lupe's signature lyrical depth was omitted, it feels incomplete compared to 'Food & Liquor' and 'The Cool'. While I liked 'Lasers' enough the first few playthroughs, it doesn't have the longevity of its predecessors. It's difficult not to be conspiratorial minded about `Lasers', knowing that it wouldn't have even been released, had it not been for rabid fans protesting outside Atlantic's building last year. Lupe clearly had more to say, and if he had the freedom to do LupE.N.D., it would've been marvelous. Legendary, even. Instead, the required five albums on his contract reduced his master plan into churning out the marginalized 'Lasers'.

Lupe himself doesn't completely loathe 'Lasers', though it's easy to see that personal frustration took a toll on him. With all the references of getting knocked down and tempting suicide on "Beautiful Lasers", you can't blame him for feeling exhausted. However, Lupe assures fans that he's not giving up the fight, because kids trapped in the ghetto need to hear a voice that's telling them it's okay that you think differently, and that they deserve better than what they've been given from society. Those are statements worth applause. But for the night clubs bumping 'Lasers's' synthetic beats into the stereo, it's only filler between "Speakers Going Hammer", "Make it Rain" and "Black & Yellow".
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2011
Format: MP3 Music
Lupe Fiasco is currently one of the best MCs in hip-hop music. One cannot tie down a specific attribute in Lupe's efforts to solidify him with such a title, because he does EVERYTHING above average. His wordplay, flow, subject and delivery has always been on point. He has given us such effort and passion within his last two albums (Lupe Fiasco's Food & Liquor and Lupe Fiasco's the Cool) that anyone who knows of him anticipated "Lasers" to bring that same gift.

Sadly however, it seems as if label pressure has influenced Lupe's creative process and the results on some of the tracks stall when it comes to his presence and delivery, as if he is fulfilling a requirement issued upon him. See, between the release of "The Cool" and "Lasers," Lupe and his record label, Atlantic Records, disputed on what "Lasers" should be. In fact, Lupe himself had finished "Lasers" in late 2009, but Atlantic put a stop in releasing it due to their feelings of the album's commercial appeal. Lupe has never been a "commercial artist," but with the record industry the way it is today, sadly, companies are now more controlling than ever. They want to sell records. They want to be exposed to commercial radio.

The official release of "Lasers" presents an album with songs that we expect from Lupe, mixed in with songs we expect from the likes of other artists, such as B.O.B., Travis McCoy (Gym Class Heroes), or other artists that have not yet earned the right to fully be in control of their releases. It' a shame, because with the tracks that Lupe did put his all into are classic songs that will remain in the hip-hop ranks for a very long time.

Track by track review:

1.) Letting Go f/Sarah Green (Produced by The Future) - 5/5 - The album's introduction song presents itself very well from the beginning of the music playing. The chorus comes in with Lupe and the song takes off. It's his song to release the pressure hindering him with this release. The fans have pushed for the album to be released to the point of protesting outside the offices of Atlantic records. If the fans were that frustrated, imagine how Lupe felt. This track tells us. Its vintage Lupe constructed in such a way it will remind us why his music appeals to us so much.

2.) Words I Never Said f/Skylar Grey (Alex Da Kid) - 5/5 - This is the best track on the album and is currently an official single. One knows that this is Lupe speaking his mind with no hold bars. This is a man who sounds possessed with his flow and delivery that mixes with the pounding beat perfectly. The chorus is excellent and Skylar Grey puts as much passion her voice as Lupe's. For a man to go against Obama himself on an official single has got to still have some say with his label. This track was the trade-off from what is to come. It's Lupe Fiasco's music and no one else's. He speaks to not only the kids, but to educated adults as well. "Just listening to Pac/Aint' going to make it stop."

3.) Till I Get There (Needlz) - 5/5 - The third track is another excellent song that will surely be a favorite of fans. It's Lupe's ambition song. He discusses his trials of releasing "Lasers." The chorus is another excellent one that transitions the verses well. This is a HIP-HOP song, a beat infused with music and a nice flow. It's not overly produced or hallow. It's another Lupe great. The first three tracks should display what is to come, but sadly, it does not.

4.) I Don't Wanna Care Right Now f/MDMA (The Audibles) - 2/5 - Lupe's "dance song?" What? A dance song? Yes, if one would tell me after his first two releases that Lupe would create a song that is begging to be played on the radio and in the clubs I would back hand them in the mouth. But sadly, here it is. Now, with what Lupe has to work with, the go-go type beat, and the pop/rock chorus, he does his best. But it just doesn't work with Lupe. The beat sounds like a The Neptunes wannabe that just doesn't have originality. MDMA sounds decent, but knowing that Lupe probably fought having his song made shows in his efforts.

5.) Out of My Head f/Trey Songz (Miykal Snoddy) - 2/5 - If one would thought track 4 was a fluke, it wasn't. Here is yet another song that sounds like desperation. My expectations weren't too high when I noticed Trey Songz being featured. He is not known for his conscious songs or anything other than women for that matter. Lupe falls into the generalized, clichéd, female pop track. If this song is for the ladies (or club goers) than I only wish it would have been released prior to the album with the stereotypical "club record single" labeled to it. It was not a good surprise. It wouldn't have been a good song no matter what artist created it.

6.) The Show Goes On (Kane Beatz) - 4/5 - This is another track that was released prior to the release as an official single. It is a great presented song. Lupe's delivery and lyrics are on point with what is expected of him. The beat is big and will remind many of a Kanye West production, circa 2004. It's a great track. The second verse especially shows Lupe's ability as an MC. However, with that being said, Lupe himself has gone into detail about how this track was forced upon him. The chorus/beat was put together before his knowledge and he had no choice but to write to it and have it be the first official single. It turned out well though.

7.) Beautiful Lasers (2Ways) f/MDMA (The Future) - 4/5 - This track attempts to be epic. It has a rock persona. The beat and chorus makes an attempt at being more than what it turns out to be. I was excited when I saw the title, I knew Lupe was going to bring a message with it due to his labeling his fans "Lasers" instead of "Losers." Lyrically Lupe does bring that, but sadly, the use of autotune on the chorus takes away from the finished product. Instead of using MDMA, I would have liked to see Lupe's former artist, Matthew Santos take care of the chorus. It's still a great song, though not excellent.

8.) Coming Up f/MDMA (The Future) - 4/5 - Another track featuring Lupe's new "go-to" feature, MDMA. This track is Lupe's answer to 2Pac's "Brenda's Got a Baby." A sort of message of hope for women not only in his own life, but outside it as well. It's a feel good track. It appeals to not only women but men as well with its message. Verse by verse is directed to a more general audience. Lyrically very well put together.

9.) State Run Radio f/Matt Mahaffey (The Future) - 2.5/5 - This track attempts to be clever in its subject matter. It's an anti-radio song that tries to be a radio hit. Interestingly enough, it works somewhat. But the chorus is just too dependent on pop generalized arrangement. Lupe does bring it lyrically. But the chorus ruins the song from being more clever than average.

10.) Break the Chain f/Eric Turner and Sway (iSHi) - 4/5 - Eric Turner comes in with the chorus from the beginning of the song and it gives the listener a hint to yet another chorus that is sung by a singer rather than Lupe himself. This song works better than the previous ones with MDMA because of the passion of Turner's voice. The beat is infectious as well. It's fast and fits well with the tone of the track. However, what suffers is the featured MC, Sway. I do not understand why he was featured because he doesn't seem to have any appeal at all. With so many artists that represent what Lupe tries to talk about (ex. Talib Kweli, Mos Def, B.O.B., J.Cole, etc.) I would have liked to see someone else featured. Sway sounds like amateur at best.

11.) All Black Everything (Wizzo Buchanon) - 5/5 - This song is the one with the biggest concept. The title explains it all. What if everyone was black? He gives his version of what life would be like and how history would have been changed. It's very interesting and clever. It gives a message that not only African Americans can appeal to. Anyone can appreciate this song. Lupe does an exceptional job at delivering the message.

12.) Never Forget You f/John Legend (Wonda & Arden Attino) - 4/5 - Lupe ends the album (save for the previously released bonus tracks) with a feature from the exceptional John Legend. This is another feel good, ambitious, inspiring song. Lupe brings his delivery with passion once again. And Legend is just that, Legend of choruses. Along with "The Show Goes On" this track was pressured upon Lupe as well from the record label. This and the fore mentioned song were requirements for the album to be released by Atlantic. It again, doesn't take away anything from the final track.

BONUS TRACKS

13.) I'm Beaming (The Neptunes) - 4/5 - Lupe receives a great beat from The Neptunes that doesn't necessarily have their signature sound, but still is presented as great. The beat has a sci-fi type feel to it and Lupe's lyrics tell a story about his forward thinking and style. It could be misconstrued as a swagger song with Lupe saying, "Look at me now/I'm beaming." But it's just a vision of where he came from to where he is now. His flow is great as well as the lyrics.

14.) Shining Down f/Matthew Santos (Soundtrakk) - 5/5 - It's truly a shame that Lupe and Santos had a falling out. Their chemistry on songs can arguably be better than any other two artists I have ever listened to. The way Santos took care of choruses and bridges along with Lupe's verses were unmatched in intertwining greatness. It's shown in past songs from Lupe's albums such as, "Fighters," "Superstar," "Streets On Fire," "American Terrorist," etc. Add "Shining Down" to that list of classic Lupe Fiasco songs. It's an epic song that was leaked long before "Lasers" was released (back in 2009 to be specific - 2 years before the official release). There was sadly no effort in marketing this track to radio. It's an exceptional song that needs to be recognized. I'm glad to see it be at least a bonus track.

I'm surprised that "Go To Sleep" was a song that was not featured on the final release. That is one song that had leaked a few months ago and had a good response from fans.

The finishing product of "Lasers" isn't what Lupe Fiasco probably wanted, but what he did with what was ordered for him to do he did well. It's not a bad thing to expose oneself to a broader audience, but there is a very thin line between doing so and being desperate for pop success. It's still a great album regardless of the disappointment from fans who want "The Cool part II." It seems as if flow wise, Lupe slowed down a bit. He made sure people heard him this time, it's just a shame that he didn't have more to say.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on May 18, 2011
Format: MP3 Music
No one is a bigger fan of Lupe then I am, but this label album does not define the Lupe Fiasco that I grown to love and respect. There are a few tracks that I really like such as Letting Go, Words i Never Said, Beautiful Lasers & Lasers (Bonus Track), but this album can not even come close to "The Cool" or "Food & Liquor". With that being said I know this project was not one of Lupe's favorites so I'm not bashing him or this album. This was just a big let down if you know what I mean, but I'm not too down about it because I know Lupe is going to put his heart and soul into the next project.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2011
Format: Audio CD
After numerous delays, endless speculation and rumors that the album was going to be shelved entirely, Lupe Fiasco's latest, Lasers, is finally here. Expectations have reached a fevered pitch in recent weeks leading up to the album's eventual release. Now that it is finally available for fans to buy and listen to, has Lasers been worth the wait? Read on to find out.

This is, by far, the most mainstream sounding of all of Lupe Fiasco's albums and is likely to be the most accessible by those who aren't hip-hop fans because of it. Fortunately for the fans, the album still features a good amount of Lupe's particular brand of socio-politically charged rap but it is too often broken up by songs that sound annoyingly mainstream with their catchy ringtone-ready hooks and bubblegum pop-esque beats. Going from a song like Words I Never Said, a scathing political rant to I Don't Wanna Care Right Now is jarring and hurts the album's cohesion. While I like that features a number of different styles, from the eclectic electronic/house sound of I Don't Wanna Care Right Now to the punk rock aesthetic of State Run Radio but there seem to be too many of the pop beats that he seemed so opposed to dating back to The Cool.

On that note, State Run Radio is one of the most intriguing songs on the album in that it seems like Lupe is using it as a way of thumbing his nose at Atlantic and label politics in general. With lines such as "Different is never good, good is only what we pick, you ain't got a hit unless it sounds like these did", it becomes clear that he is not a fan of the business side of the music industry. It is on songs such as this that Lupe sounds his best, even if he does seem to lack focus. Songs like All Black Everything, on which he tells a story of an "all black" alternate reality where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is still among us and Eminem and 50 Cent have swapped ethnicities and Beautiful Lasers, on which he talks about his personal struggles in a somewhat angsty, but not unbearably so, fashion best demonstrate his ability and are genuinely enjoyable.

As I listen to this, I keep thinking that this isn't the album Lupe actually wanted to make and this is not the Lasers that he envisioned. It seems as though Lupe was phoning this one in to appease studio executives and get out from under their collective thumb.

It's a shame that this album was locked in development hell for so long and a bigger shame that Atlantic was apparently able to strong-arm Lupe into making so many songs that he clearly didn't want to make. Lasers seems like it could have been better without such interference but, to that end, I can't actually blame Lupe here. Rather, it seems the same label politics Lupe addresses in State Run Radio are to blame. The influence executives have over the artists they've signed and the ways in which they can and do limit creative expression is disconcerting but that's a story for another day.

Lasers isn't the album I was hoping for and given the caliber of rap that Lupe Fiasco has ably demonstrated that he is capable of, I feel as though this was a half-hearted effort, at best. Despite my criticisms, I can't say that I dislike Lasers as an album but it's definitely a step down from Lupe's previous efforts. Lasers is a good album on its own merits but considering the amount of hype it had going for it, good just isn't good enough.

Favorite tracks - All Black Everything, State Run Radio, Letting Go, Beautiful Lasers
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on March 10, 2011
Format: MP3 Music
After numerous delays, endless speculation and rumors that the album was going to be shelved entirely, Lupe Fiasco's latest, Lasers, is finally here. Expectations have reached a fevered pitch in recent weeks leading up to the album's eventual release. Now that it is finally available for fans to buy and listen to, has Lasers been worth the wait? Read on to find out.

This is, by far, the most mainstream sounding of all of Lupe Fiasco's albums and is likely to be the most accessible by those who aren't hip-hop fans because of it. Fortunately for the fans, the album still features a good amount of Lupe's particular brand of socio-politically charged rap but it is too often broken up by songs that sound annoyingly mainstream with their catchy ringtone-ready hooks and bubblegum pop-esque beats. Going from a song like Words I Never Said, a scathing political rant to I Don't Wanna Care Right Now is jarring and hurts the album's cohesion. While I like that features a number of different styles, from the eclectic electronic/house sound of I Don't Wanna Care Right Now to the punk rock aesthetic of State Run Radio but there seem to be too many of the pop beats that he seemed so opposed to dating back to The Cool.

On that note, State Run Radio is one of the most intriguing songs on the album in that it seems like Lupe is using it as a way of thumbing his nose at Atlantic and label politics in general. With lines such as "Different is never good, good is only what we pick, you ain't got a hit unless it sounds like these did", it becomes clear that he is not a fan of the business side of the music industry. It is on songs such as this that Lupe sounds his best, even if he does seem to lack focus. Songs like All Black Everything, on which he tells a story of an "all black" alternate reality where Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is still among us and Eminem and 50 Cent have swapped ethnicities and Beautiful Lasers, on which he talks about his personal struggles in a somewhat angsty, but not unbearably so, fashion best demonstrate his ability and are genuinely enjoyable.

As I listen to this, I keep thinking that this isn't the album Lupe actually wanted to make and this is not the Lasers that he envisioned. It seems as though Lupe was phoning this one in to appease studio executives and get out from under their collective thumb.

It's a shame that this album was locked in development hell for so long and a bigger shame that Atlantic was apparently able to strong-arm Lupe into making so many songs that he clearly didn't want to make. Lasers seems like it could have been better without such interference but, to that end, I can't actually blame Lupe here. Rather, it seems the same label politics Lupe addresses in State Run Radio are to blame. The influence executives have over the artists they've signed and the ways in which they can and do limit creative expression is disconcerting but that's a story for another day.

Lasers isn't the album I was hoping for and given the caliber of rap that Lupe Fiasco has ably demonstrated that he is capable of, I feel as though this was a half-hearted effort, at best. Despite my criticisms, I can't say that I dislike Lasers as an album but it's definitely a step down from Lupe's previous efforts. Lasers is a good album on its own merits but considering the amount of hype it had going for it, good just isn't good enough.

Favorite tracks - All Black Everything, State Run Radio, Letting Go, Beautiful Lasers
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on March 8, 2011
Format: MP3 MusicVerified Purchase
Lupe Fiasco's long-awaited "Lasers" has finally been released. I've given it a quick listen and it sounds like it will reward some deeper listening. One problem: Amazon didn't label this download as a "clean" version. Hope I can get a refund or a free album download out of this. Poor form, Amazon.
44 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on August 6, 2011
Format: Audio CD
In my opinion, Lasers is rather lack-luster, really. The majority of the tracks are 'sold out' and pop-oriented, and it's got some really mediocre hooks. Most of the songs I didn't care for, but in contrast I loved The Show Goes On, and Words I Never Said. I'd say that All Black Everything, State Run Radio, and Til I Get There are okay. I dislike the rest of the tracks.

As already said, it's lack-luster, but Lasers has its moments, so I'll give it a three.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: Vinyl
When Lupe Fiasco emerged in 2006 with his debut album, "Lupe Fiasco's Food & Liquor", he was hailed as the next big thing. The trouble was he had more critical love than commercial love. A year later, he released his sophomore album, "Lupe Fiasco's The Cool", an album that was surprisingly successful. He reached gold status and had a huge radio hit with the song "Superstar". He then decided to record and release a third album called "Lasers" in 2009, but he ran across problems with the record label. Atlantic Records was trying to impose their will on Lupe- just as they had done with his labelmates at the time B.o.B. and Saigon in the same year. They wanted him to make strictly pop records and sign a 360 deal- neither of which he would agree to. So, there became a showdown of epic proportions between Lupe and Atlantic over the artistic direction of "Lasers". He tried releasing two singles- "Shining Down" and The Neptunes produced "I'm Beamin'", but received no cooperation or support from the label. Things reached a boiling point when there was talk from Atlantic about shelving the album, which caused a reaction from protestors who passed the word online about staging a boycott of Atlantic Records in October 2010 over the mishandling of "Lasers". On the day of the boycott, Lupe and his record label came to a compromise and a release date- March 2011 for the project.

Fast forward several months later when "Lasers" sees the light of day. There are a couple of things that are noticeable about the album. The earlier singles "Shining Down" and "I'm Beamin'" have been dropped from the tracklisting and the album has a quite radio friendly sound- though it's not due to the fault of Lupe. The album may be pop oriented, but he hasn't lost his flair for being critical. Look no further than the first single "The Show Goes On", in which he airs out his greivances over his battle with Atlantic Records. On the song "Words I Never Said", he gets very controversial over remarks about political figures and social issues. He duets with his labelmate Trey Songz on the love song "Out Of My Head", and John Legend on the closing track "Never Forget You". He criticizes the terrestrial airwaves on the rock infused "State Run Radio". He dreams of a Utopian future where the issue of race doesn't exist on "All Black Everything". While "Lasers" is listenable in spots, it's mostly a letdown compared to his previous efforts- even though it's not his doing. While Atlantic got the pop record they wanted from him, the album is more of a disappointment on the creative end. Hopefully, they will let Lupe have more artistic control on the next effort.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 16, 2011
Format: MP3 Music
Ok album but after jumping on the Lupe band wagon after "Food And Liquor" and "The Cool", this was far from what I expected.

The album seems to be for the fist pumping club crowd. His message is still the same which is good, but not the beats I was looking for.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 13, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Lupe has a signature style that his fans look for and it's not on this album. Imagine if Brittany Spears put out an R&B/Soul album, her fans would be like wtf? If you are a Lupe fan that is the feeling you will have after listening to Lasers. The album isn't bad (for some other artist) it's just not Lupe, its Atlantic records stripping an artist of everything that makes them great.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Tetsuo & Youth (Explicit)
Tetsuo & Youth (Explicit) by Lupe Fiasco (Audio CD - 2015)

Lupe Fiasco's Food & Liquor
Lupe Fiasco's Food & Liquor by Lupe Fiasco (Audio CD - 2006)

Lupe Fiasco's the Cool
Lupe Fiasco's the Cool by Lupe Fiasco (Audio CD - 2007)
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.