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Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it's still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
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The Last Days (Peeps) Hardcover – September 7, 2006


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Product Details

  • Series: Peeps
  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Razorbill (September 7, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159514062X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595140623
  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 6.3 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,662,395 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Starred Review. Grade 8 Up–The names of rock bands are used for chapter titles in this intriguing, fast-paced sequel to Peeps (Penguin, 2005), and music permeates the novel. While mysterious, dark happenings have taken over New York City's hot, humid summer (black water bubbling from faucets and hydrants, and rats congregating in packs on city streets), Moz, an aspiring guitarist, and his closest associate, Zahler, search for promising musicians to complete their sound. One night, as Moz tries to save a vintage 1975 Fender Stratocaster as it is inexplicably thrown out of an apartment window, he meets Pearl, an attractive and slightly off-center musical genius. With the help of Zahler, they recruit a street drummer named Alana Ray, and Pearl convinces her talented singer friend Minerva, who is recuperating from a serious illness that appears to have left her with a strange desire for human blood, to join them. Moz and Pearl work through power issues as they become closer. And as the danger to New York City begins to escalate, the band's evolving music and especially the energized singing of Minerva–both described in great detail–play a central role in calling up the deadly forces and ultimately helping to defeat them. The dialogue is crisp and clear and alternately funny and biting. While it will help to read Peeps first, this novel stands on its own. It's a real winner.–Jack Forman, Mesa College Library, San Diego
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Something horrifying is bubbling up from the earth, and vampires stalk the streets of New York--but in this electric sequel to Peeps (2005), Moz and his buddy Zahler think only of forming a band. One night Moz, with the help of passerby Pearl, rescues a Fender Stratocaster guitar. Like Moz, Pearl is a musician, and a band is born. Soon the band recruits a singer, a Peep with her parasite mostly under control, and a drummer who literally sees the music and the terrifying things it attracts. Eventually it becomes clear that the new band will play a key role in the coming struggle against the powerful evil. Westerfeld continues his captivating, original vision, improving it in this tightly plotted sequel. The new characters are engaging, and the breezy dialogue is graced with both unique slang and a touch of humor. Teen will savor the picture of a band finding its sound while saving the world. Both new readers and Peeps fans will eat this up. Lynn Rutan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Scott Westerfeld's teen novels include the Uglies series, the Leviathan and Midnighters trilogies, and the so-called "NYC Trilogy": So Yesterday, Peeps, and The Last Days. Scott was born in Texas, and alternates summers between Sydney, Australia, and New York City. His next book, Afterworlds, comes out September 23, 2014.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

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#45 in Books > Teens
#45 in Books > Teens

Customer Reviews

Still, it wasn't bad.
small review
Too many characters and way too many points of veiw made the book seem too superficial and scattered.
H. Derby
I was disappointed in this as a sequel, but at least it did have a satisfactory ending.
Stacy L. Daniels

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Patricia Altner on September 11, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Strange things are happening in New York City. Stranger than usual, that is. In fact it is down right scary in a paranormal kind of way. Black liquid spurts out of fire hydrants; rats, more numerous than ever, are roving the streets; and people suddenly go crazy, like the woman who throws all of her belongings out her sixth floor apartment window all the while screaming about who knows what. One about-to-be-discarded object catches the attention of two teen onlookers. The crazy lady waves a mid-seventies Fender Stratocaster with gold pickups and whammy bar. Pearl and Moz, strangers until this moment, work together to catch this valuable guitar before it crashes to the pavement. A quick glance above and both glimpse human figures moving swiftly towards the crazy woman's window. Neither comments aloud on this phenomenum. Instead they excitedly talk about their passion for music and the possibility of forming a band.

Pearl is a super smart multitalented gal who thinks Moz is really cute. She and Moz and his friend Zahler meet for practice sessions, and quickly realize they need a drummer and a singer to make their band complete. Street wise Alana Ray agrees to play percussion. She has the ability to see music with color and movement and is especially sensitive to these visions when Pearl brings in her friend Minerva to sing. A few months earlier Minerva suffered a mysterious breakdown. She now stays most of the time in her room, fights to contain the beast she feels inside her, and writes pages full of weird symbols that only she understands. At the first rehersal, when all five gather to play, Minerva singing blends with the music and evokes wonder and fear.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Teen Reads on January 12, 2007
Format: Hardcover
The apocalypse is coming, so Pearl, Moz and Zahler do the only logical thing they can think of:

They form a band.

Pearl and Moz never knew each other before a parasite-positive, or a "peep" --- a person who carries a parasite that can best be described as vampirism --- threw a 1975 Fender Stratocaster with gold pickups out a third-floor window. Pearl turns out to be a talented keyboardist, and Moz, who plays guitar, invites bass player Zahler to join them. Moz recruits Alana --- their bucket-percussing homeless schizophrenic drummer --- from her regular street-corner gig in Times Square. Minerva, the lead singer, is an old friend of Pearl's. But Minerva hasn't been the same since she became afflicted with some kind of weird illness that causes her to hate the things she once loved, crave a lot of raw meat and gain a rather strong attachment to her cat.

Black water is flowing from fire hydrants over streets piled with garbage. Cannibals are in charge of record companies. The Night Mayor, first seen in Scott Westerfeld's PEEPS, knows that time and technology have come together to form the perfect environment for a pandemic. The worms that haunt the subway tunnels of New York are getting stronger and more numerous. Homeland Security can't do anything about the spreading of the parasite that infects Minerva, but the Night Watch --- the organization working to stop the parasite's rapid spread --- can. They're going to attempt to use the band's unearthly melodies as a weapon against the killer worms and paranoid peeps.

If you haven't already read PEEPS, you'll want to do so before starting THE LAST DAYS; even though this gruesome, terrifying and amazing sequel can stand on its own, you'll understand it a lot better if you read its predecessor first.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By small review on June 26, 2010
Format: Paperback
The Last Days picks up shortly after Peeps ends, but with an entirely new cast of characters (though Cal has a cameo toward the end). I liked Cal better than the characters in TLD, so I didn't enjoy this book as much as the first book. Still, it wasn't bad.

TLD follows a group of teens as they form a band and attempt to get a record deal. They mesh well together--and Westerfeld's description of the music they create is otherworldly amazing--but there's something strange about their lead singer. You guessed it, she's a peep. But why is she singing for this band, and why do strange things happen when they perform?

TLD was good, but not as good as Peeps in both plot and characters. The plot is much less engaging and really has only one plot line that's just so-so compared to the plot twists in Peeps. As a sequel, this was a bit of a let down as it just doesn't stack up well enough next to Peeps. TLD does, however, tie up some loose ends from Peeps and provides a more definite ending to the overall story. Both books can be read alone, though I'd recommend reading them both and in order.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on February 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Scott Westerfeld's THE LAST DAYS provides a modern-day possible end-of-the-world scenario. It's a hot New York City Summer and a plague is turning people into cannibals. Five teens are trying to focus on their new band - but find their own music is caught up in the uncertainties of their times. LAST DAYS continues and end-of-world saga begun in PEEPS, but no prior familiarity is needed to quickly become accustomed to plot and action.
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