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Last Seen Wearing (Inspector Morse) Mass Market Paperback – March 2, 1997


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Product Details

  • Series: Inspector Morse (Book 2)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Ivy Books (March 2, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0804114919
  • ISBN-13: 978-0804114912
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 0.9 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #98,266 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Morse was beset by a nagging feeling. Most of his fanciful notions about the Taylor girl had evaporated and he had begun to suspect that further investigation into Valerie's disappearance would involve little more than sober and tedious routine.' --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

"Morse is a thoroughly convincing detective, and a very humane one, too."

--The New York Times Book Review



Valerie Taylor has been missing since she was a sexy seventeen, more than two years ago. Inspector Morse is sure she's dead. But if she is, who forged the letter to her parents saying "I am alright so don't worry"? Never has a woman provided Morse with such a challenge, for each time the pieces of the jigsaw start falling into place, someone scatters them again. So Valerie remains as tantalizingly elusive as ever. Morse prefers a body--a body dead from unnatural causes. And very soon he gets

one. . . .



"You don't really know Morse until you've read him. . . . Viewers who have enjoyed British actor John Thaw as Morse in the PBS Mystery! anthology series should welcome the deeper character development in Dexter's novels."

--Chicago Sun-Times



"Fascinating . . . Very satisfying."

--Book Sellers

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Customer Reviews

Excellent...love all of the Inspector Morse series!
Jan Wildman
I enjoy reading a book where I have to go to the dictionary to find a word I am unfamiliar with.
jacqui maria
Fortunately, for Dexter fans, however, the works only get better from here.
J. Smallridge

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 1, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you are tired of American detective stories that contain so much violence and gore, you will find this British detective story very refreshing. The characters Morse and his side-kick are so well written, so real that they almost jumped out of the pages. It doesn't matter even if this is the first Morse story you read. Morse, unlike some of the "supercop" characters in American novels, uses his wit instead of muscle, logic instead of guns to solve crimes. His personality is less than perfect, he makes mistakes from time to time, but that's exactly what makes his character so likeable and so believable. Ah, and he's got that British sense of humor too! I have to tip my hat to Dexter for his such fine writing and I'll certainly look for more of his books. If you like clever, entertaining detective stories, you will like this one. If you want to learn how to write good detective stories, you will need this one. If you enjoy British humor, don't miss this one!
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By S. Schwartz on July 25, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a very intelligent book, and in it we see a very vulnerable, although still brilliant Morse. Dexter writes in such a way that we're there every step of the way with Morse as he stumbles his way around trying to solve a very confusing, old disappearance case. It is done so well, that as we read and see through Morse's eyes, the tension keeps on building and building. We begin to wonder why we can't figure out what happened to Valerie Taylor either. As well done as the televisin series is, and I have seen this story enacted, it cannot come close to the intricasies of the plot in this particular book. One of the best examples I've seen of plot and character development done in the mystery genre.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 5, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you are tired of American detective stories that contain so much violence and gore, you will find this British detective story like a breath of fresh air. It doesn't matter if this is the first Morse story you read. The characters are so well written, the plot so well developed that it will keep you guessing till the very end. Morse, until those "supercops" in American's novels, uses his wit instead of muscles, logic instead of guns to solve crimes. Yes his personality is less than perfect, he makes mistakes from time to time, but that's exactly what makes this character believable and likable. And he's got that British sense of humor, too! I have to tip my hat to Dexter for his fine writing, and I will certainly look for more of his books. If you like well written, clever, funny detective stories with a dose of British humor, look no further.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. M Mills on August 18, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
"Last Seen Wearing" is a 326 page police procedural novel by Coliin Dexter. Dexter's Inspector Morse character is best known for the long series of BBC dramatizations of the Dexter novels. The book keeps you turning pages and is a light read to while away a dull afternoon or quiet evening by the beach or at the fireside. The novel is the third in the Morse series being published in 1978.
The Plot: Young and sexually alluring Valerie Taylor is missing from here home in a village near Oxford. She has been missing for almost three years when Morse is assigned the perplexing disappearance. An earlier detective had worked the case but been killed in a traffic accident. Morse has to interview several teachers and headmaster at Valerie's school. Morse goes to Wales to interview a teacher named Acum The case has many red herrings along the way to being solved. Morse and Lewis see many of their conjectures proved to be false trails. One of the school officials is murdered before the Taylor case is solved.
What makes these books so good is the complex character of Morse. He is a single, middle aged man who has strong sexual needs. Morse loves opera especially the huge works of Richard Wagner. He also enjoys good wine and a fetching lady.
Once you are hooked on Morse you will enjoy reading all the books in the series. Dexter writes with wit, erudition and suspense. Recommended for all mystery fans!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Smallridge on November 27, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is a good early Morse book. The plot isn't bad, Morse is at his best in solving a tough crime, and the characters are compelling. Fortunately, for Dexter fans, however, the works only get better from here.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael K. Smith TOP 500 REVIEWER on October 1, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Like any police detective, Chief Inspector Morse, homicide specialist of the Thames Valley CID, has his good days and his bad days. He knows that not every case is solvable, but as long as he's got a body to play with, he's happy. But then his boss demands he look into the matter of teenager Valerie Taylor who went missing two or three years before. Morse had reckoned she was dead, but now a letter has arrived from her, telling her folks not to worry. Morse doesn't do missing persons -- but this time he has no choice. Maybe the letter's a fake, maybe the girl's actually dead after all. He can only hope. With that thought in mind, and dragging Sgt. Lewis somewhat reluctantly behind him, Morse begins talking to all the people in Valerie's life: Family, schoolteachers and administrators, the crossing guard down the block. And most of them seem to have secrets, some of which directly involve Valerie and some of which seem to overlap with each other. As Lewis notes, Morse loves to construct deviously complex theories that are sheer overkill in solving most sorts of crime. And he's in full form here, building one ingenious edifice after another, only to see each of them collapse in the presence of new facts. The story moves along at a good clip and you'll cheer as Morse repeatedly gets his comeuppance.
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