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Last Warrior Hardcover – July 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 4 - 7
  • Hardcover: 234 pages
  • Publisher: Cooper Square Publishing Llc (July 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0873586786
  • ISBN-13: 978-0873586788
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 4.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,942,623 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 6-8. Mercilessly wrenched from his home in Arizona, a young Apache warrior struggles against becoming "white-manized" at the Carlisle Indian School. Solito is forced to wear a white man's rough clothing, to learn English, to sleep on a bed, and to treat bluecoats with respect. The ultimate insult is a new name: Daniel. Despite his hardships and acts of rebellion, Solito eventually learns a trade and is apprenticed to an elderly Quaker harness maker, whom he comes to love and admire. When the old man dies, Solito remains with the man's widow, whom he now calls grandmother. However, after killing a nightime intruder who is attacking the woman, the young man flees the area, puts aside any trust he had in white people, and courageously resolves to travel back to Arizona where he learns the truth about his birth. Gradually, he is accepted by whites and Apaches alike for his bravery. Ellison deftly portrays the conflict between Solito's anger at the injustices done to him and his slowly dawning realization that some white people are honorable. This work is well researched and rich with historical detail. However, the text is dense and may intimidate less competent readers.?Peggy Morgan, The Library Network, Southgate, MI
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael Darrow on February 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
I would definitely NOT recommend this book to young Chiricahua readers unless they are doing research on indoctrination literature. The author has obviously done extensive investigation of existing historical and cultural documentation on the Chiricahua Apache Tribe and the Western Apache Tribe. This has highlighted the severe lack of published information on Chiricahua world-view, philosophy, and rationale. The author has filled this gap with extrapolation from non-Indian world-view, philosophy, and rationale as well as from popular culture perceptions of what Apaches should be like. The result is that the book overall portrays Non-Apache culture as right and Apache culture as wrong. Solito is portrayed as starting out imbued with Apache culture and with hatred and with lack of understanding, and he ends up imbued with white culture and understanding and free of hatred. There is not a single character in the book who shows any development other than Solito's "whitemanization." Solito seems to encounter an extremely high proportion of helpful well-meaning white people. Only one of the Apaches is portrayed as having died at school. In the beginning of the book, a wounded character who goes out of his way to honor Apache tradition by saving Solito's life criticizes Solito saying that he will never be a warrior. The prediction, it appears, is accurate. Solito spends much of the book wracked by feelings of inadequacy. At the end of the book Solito uses his apparently superior white man techniques to subdue the person who had both saved and criticized him, and delivers him to his death. Solito return to his home to the accolades of loving supportive appreciative white people. I would highly recommend this book as a tool to imbue white people with a sense of superiority. The book shows how good research and presumably good intentions can go wrong.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I had to read a book for a Native American project for school and this book was Excellent! I could not put it down. The conflict is very thurough and you are on the edge of your seat seeing what Solito would do next! You will love the book.
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By A Customer on December 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
The Last Warrior is a great story about hardships, courage and perseverance. The story begins when a young Apache boy is taken from his Arizona homeland before he can complete his warrior training. The white men try to make him act and look like someone he is not. After becoming adjusted to this new way of life, he goes to live with a quake family. One night, a burglar breaks into the house and he kills the intruder to protect his new family. After killing this white man in self-defense, he goes on the run before he is found and killed. After three long years of living in the wild, he finally makes it back to Arizona on his own. (He walked over 3 thousand miles from Pennsylvania to Arizona). He is the last of his kind and gains a new perspective of white men he did not know before. I recommend this book to anyone who is in the mood for a good story and wants to know more about this topic.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Brandon Gray on October 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
I thought the book is very interesting. I am not very far in the book , but it starts off good. It is about a young boy who is in the middle of his warrior training when his tribe gets shipped out and put in a camp. I suggest that anyone who likes books about history should read this
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