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Lateral Thinking: Creativity Step By Step Hardcover – Import, January 1, 1970


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Harper & Row; 1ST edition (1970)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0706233077
  • ISBN-13: 978-0706233070
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,392,503 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Nonetheless, it remains a very interesting book, simple and useful.
Pedro P. R. Vasconcellos
This book helped me to know how we can use our thinking in more efficient ways.
Mohammad Reza Yaesubi(myaesubi@sinasoft.net)
Everyone interested in creative thinking should buy it and read it.
Michael Michalko

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

89 of 109 people found the following review helpful By Eric J. Lyman on March 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
I have read several of Edward de Bono's books in recent years and I enjoy his theories. Which is why I recently dished out a lot of monet for the Why So Stupid book that is supposedly his magnum opus and is available only by direct mail. And after reading it, I will report that most of what is there for a very high price is also in this book and in de Bono's Thinking Course, which can be had for around 4% of that cost -- if that isn't worth a 5-star rating, what is?
The more expensive book does illustrate a more evolved form of de Bono's theories, and they are applied in more situations (including many that are relevant to the world today). But my advice is to by this book or the Thinking Course -- both are excellent primers on de Bono's excellent ideas.
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By R. Mclain on December 6, 2007
Format: Paperback
Well, I have to admit I was a bit disappointed, but maybe that's just from erroneous expectations. I'm an artist & designer, and a graphic designer I admire had this on his list of the most important books he'd read, and that was my motivation to pick it up.

My conclusion is that this is a great book for non-'Creative' types (not to mean that they're not creative, just that they're not in a 'Creative' field such as the arts) such as scientists and engineers, who are looking to round out their thought process, or young adults in jr. high or high school who are exploring the nature of creativity.

It is intriguing to hear someone dissect the creative process in a cold, calculating, scientific sort of way, and de Bono does this job quite well without coming off as too fatuous (a common fate in that endeavor it seems).

Ultimately though, the creative thinking de Bono discusses is a very specific and fairly limited type, namely problem-solving. It's telling that almost all of the examples & figures he gives are geometric puzzle-solving. This would be a great book to read right before you take a IQ or SAT test.
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38 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Mohammad Reza Yaesubi(myaesubi@sinasoft.net) on January 15, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book helped me to know how we can use our thinking in more efficient ways. I have used technics that were introduced in this book and they worked very well, my B.S. thesis in Software engineering was based on this book. I Design a Web based Instructor software that teach the students Lateral thinking technics and Practical Thinkings. I used those technics during Analysis & Design of my Software and I developed those technics in my career. Lateral thinking is wonderful book that when everybody uses its technics, s/he will find great improvements in his/her life and career.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Mario Mitas on December 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
"With lateral thinking one goes on generating as many approaches

as one can even after one has found a promising one."

[Lateral Thinking]

Human mind is during the school education instructed how to think vertically. Meaning, how to evaluate alternatives, how to pick the right one and how to proceed from premises to conclusions. However, it is only seldomly instructed how to create alternatives, how to generate ideas - and that's were this book is helpful. Kind regards, Mario.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Priya on November 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is one book where the author spends 70 % of the time in telling "why" should you ever consider Lateral Thinking. In between this justifications there are few good ideas.

De Bone has given some interesting ideas that should be looked closely and practised by everyone, like the ones given below.

1. Look at the problem from a different angle (try reversing the problem)

2. Don't stop when one solution is found and keep looking for better ones for some more time

3. Try rearranging and jumping forward in solution seeking process even if the intermediate steps sounds illogical

4. Try to delay judgment so as to let new ideas grow

Place two irrelevant things in the mind for some time and analyze it, this might create an opportunity to look at the problem differently

5. Don't challenge an idea to find if it is right or wrong but look if it can add any insight at a different angle

6. Remove No and replace it with a new word (here he suggests using PO) that would challenge the statement and generate new ideas rather than rejecting an irrelevant one

7. Remove the cliché patterns my removing or looking deep into the labels

Looks more of a teacher's manual rather than a thought provoking book, might be of interest if you are planning to get new idea to teach your kid.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 10, 2004
Format: Paperback
"Do not limit your mind, don't assume" could be a brief summary of the book. The author has made quite a good start, explanining how new ideas could be formed and how the best looking idea may not be the best to pick up. The book would be useful for people who have been in a stable environment, a place where improvements are seen as threats so you couldn't improve most of the things. The negative side was, that there were to many repeats of the same idea through out the chapter and the book. That was a bit boring. The "PO" word is a good idea, but doesn't need that much explanation. I would recommend it for starters in continuous improvement concept.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By GangstaLawya on September 17, 2009
Format: Paperback
I'm puzzled by the negative reviews on this book. The author is very lucid. Some critics, which you can find on wikipedia, note that he hasn't attempted to "prove" his position. That's not the author's point. By definition, he isn't indulging in linear or logical thought. If he were to concede to his critics, he wouldn't write the book. The critics have missed the point. His examples supply, not proof, but circumstantial evidence supporting his theory. In a court of law, sometimes all you have is circumstantial evidence. Since when is such evidence inadmissible in an argument anymore than it is in the courts of old? It's been used for centuries with the courts and with famous mathematical statements known as "conjectures." Pure mathematical thought doesn't say anything about the world because it is constituted of tautologies. If you want to say something about the world, as the author does, you are by definition departing from purely formal thought and therefore purely formal rigor in your demonstrations. I thought the homely examples by the author were good. For example, he discusses the feature in European liquor manufacturers of fruit contained in a bottle of liquor. How did it get there? Was the bottom attached? No. There is no visible weld. Was the fruit pushed inside? No. It's too wide for the bottle neck. Solution? Insert the small bud of the fruit into the bottle and let it grow there. The glass operates as a small green house; therefore, it won't interfere with the growth of the fruit. With regard to the conundrum PO, the author is explicit on page 225. "Logic could be said to be the management of NO. . .The concept of lateral thinking is insight restructuring and this is brought about through the rearrangement of information.Read more ›
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