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Laughing at Wall Street: How I Beat the Pros at Investing (by Reading Tabloids, Shopping at the Mall, and Connecting on Facebook) and How You Can, Too Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 168 customer reviews

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Length: 239 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

Review

""You don't need Wall Street to be a successful investor. In fact, Chris Camillo's inspirational approach to creating wealth shows that "you know more" than the suits on Wall Street --and that knowledge can make you millions." --T. Harv Eker, Author of #1 NY Times Bestseller"Secrets of the Millionaire Mind" ""Chris Camillo shows the power that self-directed investors today have to transcend the advice of Wall Street gurus."--Perry Blacher, CEO of Covestor-the world's largest portfolio verification service "In Laughing at Wall Street, Chris Camillo's personal story, engaging anecdotes, and practical common sense explanations show the novice and amateur investor what works and what doesn't. I'm intrigued. And inspired." --Erin Chase, Author of "The $5 Dollar Dinner Mom Cookbook" "Chris Camillo's" Laughing at Wall Street" is a fun, practical guide for the novice investor on how to use tools at their disposal such as social media and observation of everyday shopping patterns to become a su

About the Author

CHRIS CAMILLO is one of one of the world’s top performing amateur investors. Most recently a market research executive, his jobs over the years have included washing and selling cars, delivering pizza, and folding clothes at The Gap. He lives in Texas with his family.

Product Details

  • File Size: 608 KB
  • Print Length: 239 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; Reprint edition (November 8, 2011)
  • Publication Date: November 8, 2011
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005EXSMLC
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #516,194 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By John Chancellor TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 3, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This book is a very interesting read. Chris Camillo, the author, takes a dim view of Wall Street and the financial analysts. He spends the first part of the book bashing the analysts approach to investing - both fundamental and technical - and the unreasonable fees most investment advisors charge.

Most investors have no idea how much is being skimmed off the top of their mutual fund accounts by the investment advisors.

Then Mr. Camillo introduces his approach to investing. It can best be described as information arbitrage - only invest when you have knowledge which Wall Street does not have or refuses to accept. For the most part this would limit your investment to smaller companies. But Apple was one of the examples cited where the market - the people on main street - where warmly embracing the iPhone but Wall Street was not.

Information arbitrage requires a keen sense of observation - something lacking in most people. You must look at what is happening around, what people are doing and then deduce what that information means to the market place. I know many people who in 2006 - 07 "knew" the real estate market had gotten way overheated. But few if any could connect the dots and use that knowledge to make a profitable investment decision.

So while the approach is very interesting, having the discipline and insight to carry it off is going to be difficult for most people.

The first half of the book is very interesting, easy to read and quite insightful when the author is presenting his theory and how to use it. He also gives some solid information about how to use the online chat rooms - what to look out for and what to expect.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As a Vine reviewer, I received an advanced pre-sales/uncorrected proof of this book to review, so some of my comments are directed to improving the book, but at the same time letting you know my overall impressions.

I rarely give 5-stars for books unless it simply blows me away and appeals to me in every sense. This book is 4-stars for its ingenuity, down-to-earth explanations/good use of analogies, and captivating narration.

Synopsis:
==========
The author narrates how he amassed ~$2M in three years, not by studying technical indicators or financial fundamentals or having an MBA or going to an Ivy League school, but by reading tabloids/watching tv, shopping, and making use of social networks online.

Essentially, he describes how he uses the concept of 'Information Arbitrage' to decide which stocks to research and potentially invest in.

The author's explanations are excellent and simple to understand. For example, he uses the analogy of pretending that your family is a publicly traded company and goes on to explain the side effects of known and unforseen events. When you are able to associate to something, it really helps to understand more technical concepts.

Also, he provides examples we can all relate to (like seeing Avatar in 3D at IMax or all those people in UGG boots) and how their respective stock prices soared and why. The book is inspiring because you and I were witness to the same things, yet we didn't see them as investment opportunities. In my own personal experience, many members of my family wanted a Keurig machine and coffee packets around Christmas-time and I had heard others talk about it. WELL, only much later did I find out how much Keurig stock had soared.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
First of all, I like the author's writing style, and I like much of the information, research and "factoids" in the book. I also think the author is probably a pretty nice guy. Any son who notices that his parent's lawnmower needs oil, then takes the time to "google" the best type of oil, THEN goes and buys that particular oil, and then mows the lawn, is more than okay in my book. He comes across as: 1) observant and 2) responsible. These are qualities I look for in any investment guru.

I also think his methods for motivating younger investors might just click with many of them.

Like many of the other reviewers, I noticed that Mr. Camillo has read the Peter Lynch books. I found my own dusty copies that I've had since the 1990's (Beating The Street, and One Up On Wall Street, each with a $2.99 sticker on the front) and looked through them for comparison purposes. Both Lynch and Camillo like to make observations at the mall, noting that high traffic stores could be attached to companies that are returning large profits. These are potential stock picks, but only after investigating further, using due diligence. I was impressed with Mr. Camillo's rejection of Coach after he investigated further. He really shines when it comes to due diligence and apparently he has made good decisions based on his investigations -- buying some stocks, rejecting others. Where Lynch and Camillo part company, though, is that Lynch buys the actual stock, and Camillo favors options. He explicity tells how to buy options in "Chapter 9: Fake It 'Til You Make It!"

In the chapter titled, "See It, Believe It!
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