Industrial-Sized Deals Best Books of the Month Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Deradoorian Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Find the Best Purina Pro Plan for Your Pet Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Metal Gear Solid 5 Gear Up for Football Deal of the Day
Kindle Price: $2.99

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Launching The Innovation Renaissance: A New Path to Bring Smart Ideas to Market Fast (TED Books Book 8) Kindle Edition

13 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$2.99

Length: 77 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Similar books to Launching The Innovation Renaissance: A New Path to Bring Smart Ideas to Market Fast (TED Books Book 8)

Mark Zuckerberg's Year of Reading Book Selections
Read along with Facebook's CEO, Mark Zuckerberg.

Product Details

  • File Size: 613 KB
  • Print Length: 77 pages
  • Publisher: TED Books (November 21, 2011)
  • Publication Date: November 21, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006C1HX24
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #496,806 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By sien on December 17, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Launching the Innovation Rennaissance by Alex Tabarrok is another fine Kindle short. Tabarrok is an academic economist and co-author of the very successful Marginal Revolution blog. The book examines how innovation is important for economic growth and how the US performs on innovation and how it could do better. The book links in with The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen which is another excellent Kindle short.

Tabarrok puts forward the view that the US can reignite innovation by changing the patent system, in particular reducing the time for software patents or abolishing them altogether and having patents of different durations and patents that the US government would then buy under certain circumstances. Tabarrok is also a big fan of prizes for innovation and thinks that more of them will improve innovation citing examples like the Ansari X-Prize and others. Tabarrok also thinks that better teachers are required. He believes that paying teachers more for performance and allowing the removal of poor teachers would improve the system. He is not a fan of increasing college attendance and points out that while college graduation rates have increased in the US they have increased in majors that are not creating innovation and not in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math fields. He also makes the very much needed point that the greater wealth of the world will mean more innovation as there is more demand and there will be more people with the time and education to innovate. Tabarrok also looks at US spending on innovation against welfare spending.

Tabarrok doesn't look at are why with the average education the US has long had how it continues to be the center of world computer technology and a major centre for medical and other research areas.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By David N. Welton on December 11, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I thought it was a pretty good recipe for improving things, but I suppose that, honestly, that's because his points mostly coincide with my own view of the world.

The one chapter/set of points that I wasn't so enthusiastic about was the one about "too many regulations". He offers no advice on how to get rid of them. Quite the contrary, he states that many regulations might be good ones, but taken all together they lead to stagnation. If they're good taken individually, how do you select which ones to eliminate? It's all well and good to wave one's hands at "too many regulations", however, constructive advice on how to rid ourselves of the bad ones without throwing out the baby with the bathwater would have been a nice thing to see.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Andy on December 2, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This won't be the most gripping book you read this year, but I finished it in one sitting and put it down relatively satisfied. While Alex did not prove his points beyond all doubt, I think the purpose of a Kindle single is more to start (or further) a conversation, rather than to finish one, and this book does that. In The Great Stagnation: How America Ate All the Low-Hanging Fruit of Modern History, Got Sick, and Will(Eventually) Feel Better, (which I believe law dictates must be mentioned alongside any review of this book), you'll find more mention of what got us into our current innovation shortage and why we'll be stuck there for a while. Tabarrok has a less pessimistic take - offering solutions to how to re-ignite American innovation.

The basic thesis here is that we can perhaps end our period of stagnation by improving our policies and culture in five core areas: Patents, prizes, education, global markets, and cosmopolitanism. He addresses each of these, offering a vision for what the U.S. would look like if we had more appropriate laws and principles in place. I found myself agreeing with Tabarrok's ideas and suggestions despite thinking that I didn't really see a path to reach them. The path, I think, requires enough people rallying behind them and turning them into legislation and major social change; neither of which seems realistic in the short term. So if you are looking for a step-by-step approach to increase American innovation - you won't find it here. If you seek a picture of what we are capable of, and what a framework for what a more innovative America would look like, this book is a good place to start.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 25, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Alex Tabarrok is economist and has written a short essay on 'Launching the Innovation Renaissance'. In this highly recommended book he analyses the current issues related to innovation - such as patents, education system and corporate rewards.

Alex Tabarrok is also known for the Tabarrok curve of decreasing innovation when patent protection increases beyond a certain level. Not dissimilar to the Laffer curve of diminishing tax returns when the tax burden increases!

His view on patents and how the increase in patent protection in the 1990's in the US, in particular in the field of software patentability, is actually diminishing innovation instead of fostering it, is very interesting, and quite aligned with what we exposed in some early blog posts such as 'How patent litigation cost half a trillion dollar inefficiency in the last 20 years!'

It is quite a short book, very easy to read, and to the point. One small issue though is that it is very US-focused and would gain to be broadened more globally looking at the innovation issues world-wide. Issues are not the same everywhere, but at the end of the day innovation does benefit everybody.

Add it to your summer reading list!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in