Customer Reviews


121 Reviews
5 star:
 (92)
4 star:
 (20)
3 star:
 (4)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


108 of 117 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best shows ever finally on DVD!
Law & Order now enters its 13th season on NBC. For all those years no one's been able to get it on commercial recording, save the 6-episode VHS set that came out in 1999. But this wasn't satisfactory to represent a show with so much history.
Now you can get the first season of this hit drama on DVD! With its renewal through 2005, you'll probably be getting the "15th...
Published on September 29, 2002

versus
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good
If you like Law and Order and want to own the whole series, that is great. But if you watch on TNT and love Briscoe, Green, and McCoy, don't start here. This is not the show you know,

It is also not the New York you know--if you are younger. 1990: a World Trade Center, a crack epidemic, a spray painted subway jungle, a yearly murder rate in the 100s, no cell...
Published on August 22, 2010 by Bill Your 'Free Form FM Print DJ


‹ Previous | 1 213 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

108 of 117 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best shows ever finally on DVD!, September 29, 2002
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
Law & Order now enters its 13th season on NBC. For all those years no one's been able to get it on commercial recording, save the 6-episode VHS set that came out in 1999. But this wasn't satisfactory to represent a show with so much history.
Now you can get the first season of this hit drama on DVD! With its renewal through 2005, you'll probably be getting the "15th Year" on DVD soon. By then Law & Order will be the longest-running police show and second longest-running drama in the history of television.
With season one you get the first appearance of Lorraine Toussaint as the infamous Shambala Green (Subterranean Homeboy Blues), both the CBS original pilot with Roy Thinnes (Everybody's Favorite Bagman) and the NBC pilot with Steven Hill (Prescription for Death), moving episodes (Indifference), and mainly the beginnings of a show that would become one of the most popular dramas of the 1990's.
The original cast features George Dzundza as Sergeant Max Greevey, the amicable but strong lead detective, Chris Noth as Detective Mike Logan, Greevey's liberal and young partner, Dann Florek as Captain Don Cragen, the no-nonsense but humorous boss, Michael Moriarty as Executive A.D.A. Ben Stone, whose dispassionate prosecution has become a trademark, Richard Brooks as A.D.A. Paul Robinette, the passionate black Assistant under Stone, and Steven Hill as D.A. Adam Schiff. Only one phrase can describe Schiff: "You have no case. Make a deal."
For me, this item is at the top of the wish list. If you like L&O, there's no passing this up!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


60 of 64 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Season 1 = Great acting, slower action, features missing., April 17, 2004
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
The first season of Law and Order lacks the bang-bang short attention span plot advances and twists of the later years, but more than makes up for it by deeper plots and better acting, along with some nice background. Unfortunately, the DVD quality isn't what it could be, which is why this is 4 stars and not 5.
From season 3 or 4 on, the Law and Order formula came into full flower. Every 'donk-donk' signifies a quick advance in the plot as a year-long investigation and trial gets compressed in an hour, except for those delicious times when it reverses in a wild plot twist. Three spinoffs prove this works regardless of who is in the role. Season 1 isn't quite like that. For instance, it often meanders slowly, spending 4 or 5 minutes at the beginning actually witnessing the crime, having the cast walk down the street talking to each other rather than going from one interview to the next. (This actually gives some great background - you finally see the full precinct room and DAs office!) The slower pace even reflects in the way the guest stars seemly act - an L&O trademark is to have an interviewee continuing to do their job while the cops grill them. Not so here. No quick hot dog lunch for meetings between the Captain and the detectives. Logan even complains when someone doesn't give them their full attention!
While not having the formula down means that action slows down, it allows for better acting and better plot development. The 'ripped from the headlines' aspect remains as large as it ever was, with the Mayflower Madam, Tawana Brawley claiming rape, the Lisa Steinberg child abuse case, and city council corruption along with several cop corruption cases. The difference is that because the actors aren't forced to move through hoops they actually get to perform. Robinette gives a soul searing performance in the the Brawley case (Half-Light) and the corruption case (Bagman) as he examines his race versus his job - and race and class in general get explored a lot more than in later years (in episodes like Homeboy Blues and Poison Ivy.) Logan acts like a rookie as he screams at people who don't help him, and nearly comes to blows with Greevey over their views on abortion and morality in Life Choice and Kiss the Girls. Stone shows actual rage in Indifference, and Schiff is a motivated caring boss and not just his normal fun cantankerous let's-cut-our-losses self. Finally, the caliber of the guest stars before they became big (Cynthia Nixon, William Macy, Epatha Merkerson!) helps as the give and take is unrestrained. This is a fair tradeoff for a slower show.
My only objection to the DVD set is the transfer is somewhat mediocre, especially for the first few episodes where you get flecking. I can't believe the original tapes weren't in better shape. Also, the features side borders on the unacceptable. Dick Wolf does talk about the original development of the show, for about 10 minutes. Other than that, nothing - except for an unbelievable ad about the Law and Order game! I can't believe there aren't outtakes or they couldn't get someone from the cast to walk through the episodes ala the Simpsons DVD sets. Definitely worth marking down a star for that.
Still, a great beginning to a great show.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars L&O, Back to Basics, March 2, 2003
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
This DVD set is a real treat for those of us who feel that Law & Order was at its best during its early years. The first season features an entirely different cast from the current program and story lines that are more intense, raw and unpredictable than the watered-down L&O of today. The characters of Ben Stone and Mike Logan are particularly interesting, as many fans labeled them the "heart and soul," of the series. Often times, we find that we know who is guilty within the first 20 minutes of the show and the moral complications come in. This is best exemplified in the episodes, "Subterranean Homeboy Blues," "Life-Choice," and "Indifference." It is also neat to see recurring characters such as the fiery Shambala Green and the cop's cop, Tony Profaci. These supporting players, along with the main cast, had personality and helped drive the show, unlike their bland, cardboard counterparts of today. Although the show is focused on the plot, we get small glimpses into the personal lives and personalities of the characters through incidental dialogue. This era of the show may have been a bit too preachy at times, but it is made up for by riviting drama that has long since died on the L&O set. I'd recommend this set to anyone who wants to see Law & Order at its dramatic best.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


38 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great television series finally arrives on DVD, August 31, 2002
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
One of tv's longest running and more critically acclaimed series is now available on DVD. "Law and Order: The First Year" collects the entire first season of this quality show. Featuring the show's original cast of characters (ADAs Ben Stone and Paul Robinette and Detectives Mike Logan and Max Greevey), the First Season contains classic "Ripped From the Headlines" styled episodes including "Subterranean Homeboy Blues" (about a woman who may or may not have shot a trio of black teenagers in self-defense), "By Hooker, By Crook" (which has Stone prosecuting a socialite/madam who is based upon the "Mayflower Madam" Sydney Barrows), and "Out of the Half-Light" (where the cops try to debunk a black teen's false accusations of rape at the hands of white police officers and prevent an Al Sharpton-inspired character from using the girl to advance his political adgenda).
Other original story episodes includes "Poison Ivy" (where Logan and Greevey investigate the death of an Ivy League college student who was a drug dealer and who may have had a gun planted on his dead body by the police officer who shot him), "Indifference" (Logan and Greevey investigate the death of a upper class child and discovers that the child was regularly raped by her father and beaten by her drug using mother), "Prisoner of Love" (which has Stone prosecuting a city commissioner and a weathly socialite/part-time dominatrix over the death of the commissioner's gay lover, who died during kinky sex), " The Torrents of Greed Parts 1 and 2" (which has ADA Stone obsessively attempting to bring down a mob boss after the mob boss is aquitted of murder), "Mushrooms" (Stone must decide whether or not to take a plea bargin from a teenager who killed a baby and paralyzed another teen when the shooter offers to testify that a powerfull mob boss ordered the killing), "The Secret Sharers" (Stone faces a hot shot Texas attorney who's client murdered a drug dealer who raped his fiance), "The Serpent's Tooth" (in which two innocent brothers are wrongfully accused and arrested for the Menendez Brothers-esque murder of their parents while Stone believes that the ultra-violent Russian Mob may be the real culprits), "Troubles" (which has Stone going after a famous Irish terrorist who arranges for the principal witnesses against him murdered before they can implicate him in court), and "The Blue Wall" (the season finale, which has Logan and Greevey investigating a conspiracy inside the police department that resulted in evidence against corporate executives on trial disappearing and discovering that a friend of theirs, Captain Donald Cragen may have been involved in the conspiracy).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Best, October 3, 2003
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
I began watching Law and Order when I was in eighth grade and have been a loyal viewer ever since. I have seen nearly every episode and at one point could name every actor who ever starred in the show and their character's name. I think that, although the show is heavily story-driven, it is the chemistry between the leads that makes the show so memorable, as well as the great storytelling and the intriguing look at morality and politics.
The show's chemistry wasn't what it was in later seasons. The show would hit its stride once Jerry Orbach came on as Lenny Briscoe in the show's third season. Nevertheless, it was not due to bad acting. George Dzundza has always been great and he is definitely believable, if not incredible, as Detective Max Greevey. Chris Noth was very memorable (especially with Orbach) as Mike Logan, a hotheaded cop who would eventually be outed for assaulting a man in public. Dann Florek played Captain Cragen, a perfect CO that supported his people but was also tough enough so that they would get the job done. On the Order side, we have Michael Moriarty, Richard Brooks, and Stephen Hill. Moriarty was great in his years as ADA Ben Stone, especially in his confrontations with frequent defense attourney Green. That relationship always dripped with conflict. Brooks played Paul Robinette, Stone's partner. He would occasionally give performances of great power, such as the episode in which he is forced to come to terms with one of his African-American heroes being a corrupt swindler (Subterranean Homeboy Blues). Stephen Hill was the heart of the series for many years, always bringing the legal matters into perspective, often with a bit of wry humor. One of the show's most beloved characters of all time, he is at his best here as DA Adam Schiff, helping Stone appropriate justice fairly and responsibly.
The show's first season occasionally produced some truly fantastic episodes. Indifference, for one, is unforgettable. It has been a favorite of mine ever since I bought the VHS collection a few years ago. It is a truly haunting, disturbing look at a very depraved and irresponsible man. The aforementioned Subterranean Homeboy Blues, also, is fantastic.
The Reaper's Helper is a painfully provocative episode about AIDS and euthanasia. By Hooker, By Crook is also an interesting look at a call-girl ring.
All in all, Law and Order not only rips from the headlines, it also precedes them. I remember watching a show on pedophile priests from the early nineties that I couldn't help but remember when the scandal broke last year. This show deserves to be in your DVD library.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Warning: This Show Is Addictive!, March 4, 2003
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
Thanks to my wife, I have become a Law & Order addict. This DVD set contains the 22 episodes of the first season of this show that has become an institution. A rather simple formula for each hour episode: the first half of the story shows the police action [Law], and the second segment of each episode covers the court trial [Order, in the court!]. The first season's cast is wonderful, but the fact that the show is still alive and strong, with a totally different cast, proves the power of the formula.
There is much to be said for watching the show without commercials; you can better appreciate the tight story lines and the wonderful writing, without a bunch of annoying commercials popping up every few minutes.
Everything works wonderfully on this show-- the great music by Mike Post, the opening narration, the formula of seeing the crime before the opening credits. The joys and challenges of life as a NY cop and life in the DA's office are artfully portrayed (and interestingly, we learn almost nothing about the personal lives of the characters). Note that there is very little on-screen violence here, even though violence is a key driver in many episodes. You will notice the absence of violence when you observe, in one episode, a storekeeper being beaten up--it is quite a shock, and makes you realize that the violence is usually just suggested (or it happens before the viewer is brought into the scene).
It is a lot of fun to notice who pops up in some of the small parts or one-episode roles. My favorite is Frances Conroy, the mother on Six Feet Under, who plays a high-class, horrid dominatrix. Cynthia Nixon plays someone quite different from her Sex and the City persona (and it is funny to see her with Chris Noth, who grows up to be Mr. Big). Also watch for Peter Frechette, Gil Bellows, Mandy Patinkin, Faith Prince, Courtney Vance, Camryn Manheim, John Spencer, William H. Macy, Andrew McCarthy, Ron Rifkin, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Samuel L. Jackson, Frances Sternhagen, S. Epatha Merkerson (in a small role, not related at all to her later starring role), Christine Baranski, plus scores and scores of New York City actors and actresses in bit parts.
Some of the recurring roles are marvelous; my personal favorite is Lorraine Toussaint, whom we first meet in Episode 2, as the in-your-face defense attorney Shambala Green.
L & O has given birth to several spin-offs, and it continues to dominate in its thirteenth season. I strongly recommend this DVD, whether you are a first time viewer or faithful addict as I have become. The only frustrating thing will be waiting for seasons 2-13 to come out on DVD!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, August 22, 2010
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
If you like Law and Order and want to own the whole series, that is great. But if you watch on TNT and love Briscoe, Green, and McCoy, don't start here. This is not the show you know,

It is also not the New York you know--if you are younger. 1990: a World Trade Center, a crack epidemic, a spray painted subway jungle, a yearly murder rate in the 100s, no cell phones, no internet. The bodega, not the Starbucks.

This is the sometimes dark and violent city I lived in in 1990, and the one Detectives Mike Logan (Chris Noth) and Max Greevy (George Dzundna) patrol. The two old school cops scan this high crime city, working through each crime like casualties in an emergency room. Robert Chambers, Joel Steinberg, drive by shootings. These cops navigate through footwork and payphones.

If you are older like me, you'll watch, still surprised at the slowness of communication, the use of paper files, all being local. How different 1990 was.

Jack McCoy did not prosecute the crimes. He did not exist until 1994. His job was Ben Stone's, played by Michael Moriarty. Where McCoy may be zellous, Stone was earnest. He cared more about points of law, a thinker without McCoys killer ambition to win. McCoy could be your drinking partner. Stone was your professor.

You may also get the feeling issues and legal points here are being over-explained. This is true by 2010 standards: but keep in mind, we are so much more sophisticated about law now no small part due to Law and Order. If you didn't understand a point, you could not just Google it. So the writing here is for a 1990 world

This is a good show in and of itself, but it is a bit jarring when you hear no Lennie wisecrack, don't see Jack's next saber tooth attack. If you want to start with what I call Law and Order Proper, start with Law & Order - The Fifth Year (1994-1995 Season). If you want to see the low crime New York, starting to look like the world wired as we know it, I would argue for Law & Order: The Seventh Year, 1996-97.

But Season One is good for collectors, lovers of good acting, and to see the New York City I knew, a long time ago.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Probably my favorite show., October 26, 2002
By 
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
I don't watch much TV at all anymore, but I'm a bit of a sucker for this show. I'd sacrifice nearly anything to see the new episodes as they air. I remember the holiday marathons A&E would run of syndicated Law & Order episodes and watching eight shows straight. Even after seeing most episodes multiple times, I tuned into the reruns whenever possible (which were once shown daily on A&E).
So, I'm obviously ecstatic that Law & Order has finally begun to make its move to DVD. While the first few episodes can be a bit dry and the production values are low, it remains praiseworthy for its realism, unique storytelling, amazing writing, intense performance, and fair exploration of moral conflicts. The stories are typically influenced by real-life headlines, and maybe you'll recognize some. Contrary to the typical drama, the personal lives of the characters are peripheral rather than primary. The personal side of the characters does manifest, of course, but the scripts do not directly pursue this. They appear adjunctively to the stories, and once one grows to understand the dynamic personalities, the show attains deeper impact. It's also a bit weird to watch these episodes with all the changes in the series (now in season 13, no one remains from the original cast).
The show accomplishes much with its formula. To quote the voice intro for every episode: "In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups: the police who investigate crime, and the district attorneys who prosecute the offenders. These are their stories." That's exactly what it is. The first half of the show sets the exposition of the crime and follows Sgt. Greevey and Detective Logan (George Dzundza and Chris Noth, respectively) and as they hunt down the criminal with the guidance of Captain Cragen (Dann Florek).
Once the suspect is apprehended, the show follows the prosecution of the alleged criminal at the hands of ADAs Ben Stone (Michael Moriarty) and Paul Robinette (Richard Brooks). The pragmatic and politically minded DA Adam Schiff (Steven Hill) offers dry wit and candid advice. Personally, I'm a little more drawn to the prosecution side of things because it tends to be the most climactic. Here, the ADAs must administer plea bargains, prepare their cases, and of course face-off with the defendants at trial.
Cases are rarely straightforward - suspicions switch around, new evidence appears, and so on. The show also evenhandedly looks at different moral and social issues, but perhaps more so in later seasons. Some issues dealt with in the first season are abortion, assisted suicide for the terminally ill, racial equality, and others. Later seasons would explore technicalities of the New York legal system in greater detail, and diversify the legal matters explored.
Here are some cheap, quick episode descriptions - spoiler free and superficially uninteresting:
"Prescription for Death" - A young girl dies during a chaotic night in a hospital, despite the lack of a serious ailment.
"Subterranean Homeboy Blues" - The shooting of two black teenagers in a subway car leads to serious racial tensions.
"The Reaper's Helper" - It would appear that a serial killer is targeting gay men, but...
"Kiss the Girls and Make Them Die" - A young woman is found badly beaten in her bed. The prosecutors may need questionable tactics to convict their man.
"Happily Ever After" - A wealthy couple is shot in their parking garage.
"Everybody's Favorite Bagman" - A councilman is mugged, a simple crime which leads the district attorney's office to something big.
"By Hooker, By Crook" - A wealthy man is found unconscious in a park after a night with a prostitute.
"Poison Ivy" - Greevey and Logan investigate the shooting of an apparent drug dealer by a fellow police officer.
"Indifference" - A very disturbing episode where detectives look for the culprit responsible for bludgeoning an abused little girl on the skull.
"Prisoner of Love" - A sadomasochist is found murdered, and his killers are discovered to have a peculiar relationship.
"Out of the Half-Light" - A black congressman uses the alleged rape of a young girl to further his political career.
"Life Choice" - The police investigate the bombing of an abortion clinic.
"A Death in the Family" - The detectives aggressively hunt the man suspected of killing a cop.
"The Violence of Summer" - A backward episode that puts the legal stuff first and the cop stuff second. Stone and Robinette struggle to rebuild a fractured case against three boys accused of raping a reporter.
"The Torrents of Greed" - This is a two-parter, and it follows ADA Stone's obsessive drive to nail a mob boss.
"Mushrooms" - Two children are shot in their own home, and the killer is not what anyone expects.
"The Secret Sharers" - The murder of a drug dealer winds up pitting Stone against a hotshot Texas lawyer who defends the suspect pro bono.
"The Serpent's Tooth" - This one has echoes of the Menendez brothers as two boys are suspected of killing their parents.
"The Troubles" - Who killed the Lebanese weapon smuggler - a Cuban drug dealer or an accused Irish terrorist?
"Sonata for a Solo Organ" - A man is found in Central Park missing one of his kidneys.
"The Blue Wall" - Captain Cragen is under suspicion for tampering with evidence.
Anyway...assuming you're still reading along this far, now is a good time to jump into the series. Law & Order is an epochal television series that deserves all its acclaim.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Crime Stories, May 2, 2003
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
The first season of NBC's long running Law & Order is a solid, but not spectacular season. The show's now familiar format of telling the story from the police side in the first half-hour and lawyers side in the second half-hour is intact, but the show hadn't found its footing. That's not to say that these shows aren't any good (they are), they just don't measure up to the incredible high standards that the series set in later seasons. The police side is made up of Chris Noth as Mike Logan, George Dzundza as Max Greevey and Dann Florek as Don Cragen and the law side is made of Michael Moriarty as Ben Stone, Richard Brooks as Paul Robinette and Steven Hill as Adam Schiff. Mr. Noth's & Mr. Dzundza's characters never really click. Obviously the producers thought so as well as Mr. Dzundza's character is killed off the show and was replaced by Paul Sorvino in season two. The teaming of Mr. Moriarty & Mr. Brooks works better and their work is more fruitful. The two season one standouts are Mr. Hill & Mr. Florek. Mr. Hill would enjoy the longest run of any character on the show and his work from season one on was exemplary. He was the rock of the show and his absence has been felt since he left. Mr. Hill was not the original choice to play the D.A., the failed pilot that was produced for CBS appears as episode six and Roy Thinnes played the D.A. Alfred Wentworth. Series creator and producer Dick Wolf made an incredibly wise decision to employ Mr. Hill in the D.A. role. Mr. Florek plays Captain Cragen with perfect balance. He is a by-the-books cop who stands by his men, but adds a sense of humor to tense situations. He was also missed upon his departure after the third season and Mr. Wolf wisely revived the character for series spin-off Law & Order: SVU. Season one also features a plethora of then unknown actors who would rise to fame in either television or films including William H. Macy, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Samuel L. Jackson, Patricia Clarkson, Christine Baranski, Courtney B. Vance, Gil Bellows, future co-star of Mr. Noth on Sex & The City, Cynthia Nixon, Six Feet Under star Frances Conroy and future Sopranos stars Dominic Chianese and Aida Turturro. Also making a guest appearance is S. Epatha Merkerson would become a series regular in season four as Lt. Van Buren. She plays a different role in the Mushrooms episode.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First Season of a great and unique crime drama, March 21, 2006
This review is from: Law & Order: The First Year (DVD)
Perhaps if Law & Order had only lasted one season, I wouldn't be giving it five stars. However, part of this season's appeal is seeing how the series has both changed and stayed the same over the last 16 years. The cast has changed several times over - in fact 22 people have played the six main roles in this show during its long run, with the last original cast member, Steven Hill as DA Adam Schiff, leaving in 2000. However, with each episode focusing on the crime at hand, and largely omitting any personal details about the main characters, all of these cast changes have done little to disrupt the show's energy over its very long run.
The series pilot, "Everybody's Favorite Bagman" was actually the sixth episode aired that year. If you wonder why it looks as though it was shot in a different decade - different film quality, George Dzundza (Max Greevey) has magically lost 20 pounds, and a completely different actor (Roy Thinnes) is playing a completely different DA (Alfred Wentworth)- it is because this episode was shot as a pilot for CBS in 1988, and rejected by that network. Thus when you hear comments made that seem to be introducing the characters after you have been watching them work together for six episodes, that is actually what is going on.
The "ripped from the headlines" episodes are present even in this first season - "Kiss The Girls and Make Them Die" and "Indifference", for example, are obvious clones of actual New York City homicides. However, there are also some cases that seem to be completely original such as "Prisoner of Love" in which Frances Conroy, the rather frumpy matron of the Fisher clan in the HBO series "Six Feet Under", plays a socialite dominatrix of all things! As far as interesting guest appearances go, you'll also notice that S. Epatha Merkerson, who plays Lieutenant Anita Van Buren from season four onward, is a mother whose children have been shot in their own home in "Mushrooms". This has been one thing Law & Order has done over the show's tenure that can be quite distracting to the regular viewer - bringing back the same actors and actresses to play different defendants, lawyers, and grieving family members in different episodes.
There is also a considerable bit of moralizing by the two detectives that you don't see in subsequent seasons, with Dzundza's Max Greevey taking the conservative Catholic view of matters and Noth's Mike Logan having a more liberal take on situations.
Finally, you'll notice how much times have changed since this series first aired. In "The Reaper's Helper", which aired in 1990, AIDS and HIV still mean a swift and grim death so that D.A. Ben Stone sabotages his own case when he learns that the mercy killing defendant has the disease himself. Today, advances in treatment and greatly expanded life expectancies of HIV patients make Stone's choice appear very odd. Also, you'll notice that the atmosphere of New York City is portrayed as loosely controlled chaos in which people are virtually sitting around waiting to get mugged versus the more orderly image that the city has today since crime dropped substantially during the 90's.
I really enjoyed this DVD set, especially since TNT now has the total rights to the repeats and usually never airs an episode made before 1998, at least not in the evenings. Thus this is really the only practical means of viewing the early days of Law and Order.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 213 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.