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Layne Staley: Angry Chair Paperback – January 27, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Xanadu Enterprises (January 27, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0933638132
  • ISBN-13: 978-0933638136
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #708,072 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

LAYNE STALEY'S FINAL WORDS: If Kurt Cobain's journals weren't tragic enough, try "ANGRY CHAIR",a biography of Alice In Chains'Layne Staley. -- ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE, Issue 917>>March 6, 2003

From the Publisher

In April 2002 the music world lost a truly great musician. The Staley Family lost a son, brother, uncle...they will never forget. Now read the serious truth about Layne Staley from his own words and the words of his closest family members during the last year before his death.

You already knew Layne was once on top of the music world as the frontman for ALICE IN CHAINS...cranking out memorables songs: "Man In The Box," "Angry Chair," "Junkhead," "I Can't Remember," "Rooster" and "Dirt"...among many others. But how did he really get there? Find out.

What was life really like for the patient, disciplined, loving Layne?
Why did his world turn so dark when he was only 8-years-old?
How and why did he come up with such shocking music?
What did he intend it to mean? Find out.

The Author respectfully peers into Layne's life to explore these and other questions. The book's goal is to discover Layne's innermost feelings and motivations. Rock Writer Adriana Rubio also explores The Renaissance Era to demonstrate the connection between Layne's artworks and that historical period. The reader quickly discovers Layne was no ordinary rock singer.


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Customer Reviews

This book reads like a report written by a junior high student.
jake smith
They seemed out of place and put there just to increase the pages of the book.
PennyLayne
She had no right to write a book about someone she did not know.
Jaime

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

74 of 75 people found the following review helpful By Gabriel Henkes on May 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
When I heard about this book being published I was pretty excited, having been a long time fan of AIC and Layne in general. I was hoping it would reveal more about his life and death than I had previously been able to find on my own. Too bad it didn't. Everything I heard about this book prior to purchasing it made it sound like Adriana Rubio had actually been in contact with Layne and had gotten a very indepth interview with him. Turns out she only talked to his mom and sister, who only told their perspective of him. This turned into them simply trying to justify their actions, or lack of them, concerning Layne, his addictions, and his childhood. Although later in the book she actually receives a phone call from Layne, all he has to say is that she better not screw up this book and that he didn't approve of it anyway.
At other points in this book I completely forgot that it was SUPPOSED to be about Layne Staley. Rubio starts going off on comparing him to goats, talking about her anorexia, giving a brief history of herion (which she never ties back to Layne, since she "didn't want to focus on his addiction"), and talks about renaissance religions. Is she writing a biography, as the book claims, or is she writing a bad high school english paper? Everthing in the book is told in her biased perspective. She never confirmed anything that Layne's mom or sister told her by going to other sources and doing research. For all she knows they could have been feeding her a line that she was all to willing to swallow and publish.
Also, throughout the book, Rubio claims that Layne didn't trust any of his bandmates any more and wasn't friends with any of them but that he was still close to his mother and sister.
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39 of 41 people found the following review helpful By jake smith on May 21, 2003
Format: Paperback
I've been a fan of Layne Staley's music since I first heard the "Man in the Box" in 1990.
Layne's work with AIC and Mad Season brought me through many troubled times throughout my adolescence and I am grateful for the musical legacy Layne left behind. Mr. Staley was one of the foremost singers of my generation and made a strong impact on the world of rock music.
When I heard of Layne's untimely demise in April of 2002, I was deeply saddened. After reading the Adriana Rubio's sorry excuse for a publication, those feelings of grief had returned.
Layne Staley's life was a remarkable one that is much more deserving of better biography than this travesty. Nowhere in Senora Rubio's indecipherable words and poor grammar could I find a reason as to why I wasted [$$$] on this book (which is about as long as a Reader's Digest magazine).
The "book" primarily contains interviews with Layne's mom and sister. Layne himself graced the author with a telephone interview, which makes up about 5 paragraphs of this 160 page "book." Layne himself admits to the author he only agreed to an interview because of his mother's constant phone calls begging him to do so. In addition to several poorly photocopied pictures of family pictures and artwork, the author gives plenty of personal insight and interpretations regarding the aura of Layne Staley, and ooooh is it deep (yes I'm being sarcastic)!
The book also makes an attempt to deify Layne by comparing him to Jesus Christ and contains other rhetoric formulated by none other than author herself. It almost seems like Adriana Rubio thinks of herself as the Oprah Winfrey of rock journalism. But let's face it, she is neither a journalist or a writer. This book reads like a report written by a junior high student.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By D. Watson on February 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
I realize Adriana is going to read this review, but I must be quiet honest. First, I don't understand why the family supposedly withdrew support for this book after it was published. If anything, it's severely complimentary to the memory of Layne Staley. Maybe that's the big problem. The book NEEDED more input from others outside of Staley's family, such as the members of Alice in Chains-but they were hesitant (not surprising with their track-record) to help out the author. Maybe I went into this book looking for more "dirt", no pun intended. This book's perspective was seen through the eyes of the author a little too much for my tastes and that's why there is seemingly a backlash against her for being more of a rabid-fan of Layne than a serious author. I'm even wondering if there is any validity to Layne's supposed phone call to Adriana where he states that the members of AIC are no friends of his. Was it a last-ditch effort to put something "shocking" in the book?
If you are wanting to experience a true autobiographical experience of Layne Staley or the band, purchase their box set, Music Bank, instead. It's just a few more dollars and it'll be listened to alot more than this book will get read!
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By piper8 on November 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
if you enjoy rambling, clumsy, self-important sentences that lead nowhere.... BUY THIS BOOK!

if you want to know more about goats, columbian drug wars, bulimia, & somebody else's grandma.... BUY THIS BOOK!

if you're a big layne staley fan, BORROW this book, cuz there are some sweet early pictures of him(when he was healthy), some of his drawings, & a few interesting "factual?" sidenotes for those laynie lovers needing more dish on their beautifullostjunkieangelman.

i'm a HUGE layne staley fan, intriqued with his sensitivity, aggression... his complexities. i got this book thinking i might better understand him, might better understand his rapid descent into a hell of his own making. instead i found myself totally annoyed with the tone of the book & it's many pointless digressions.

i wanted to like it, but i just didnt.
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