The Lazarus Machine (Tweed & Nightingale Adventures) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$13.15
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $3.80 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Lazarus Machine (Tweed & Nightingale Adventures) Hardcover – November 6, 2012


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.15
$0.01 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


Frequently Bought Together

The Lazarus Machine (Tweed & Nightingale Adventures) + The Osiris Curse: A Tweed & Nightingale Adventure
Price for both: $27.01

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Michael Vey 4
Featured New Release in Teen Science Fiction & Fantasy

Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Series: Tweed & Nightingale Adventures
  • Hardcover: 263 pages
  • Publisher: Pyr (November 6, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1616146885
  • ISBN-13: 978-1616146887
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #979,734 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Crilley's newest is a wild ride....Even the setting is intriguing: an alternate 1895 complete with computers, automation and a super-secret government agency. You'll love the quirky one-liners and the nonstop action."
-RT Book Reviews, Compelling- Page-turner)

"At times witty and snarky as well as suspenseful and terrifying, this story grabs readers immediately and propels them along the streets of London in what is an alternate 1895. Automatons, computers and steam engines give this book a feel both futuristic and fantastical. The instant connection between Tweed and Nightingale is believable and the reader will eagerly await the sequel to see what is in store for these two. …Even those readers who do not embrace the steampunk genre will love the pacing and mystery of this story. Highly recommended for ages 12 and older."
-SWON Libraries, ROYAL Reviews

"An excellent steampunk YA adventure novel.... If you like your action/heist tales dressed up in goggles and greatcoats, this is a perfect choice."
-Steampunk Canada

"If you're a fan of mysteries, science fiction, and witty dialogue you'll definitely want to pick up a copy of The Lazarus Machine!"
-Literary Exploration

"One of the richest Steampunk stories I have read, period."
-Justin's Book Blog

About the Author

Born in Scotland in 1975, Paul Crilley moved to South Africa when he was eight years old. He was rather disappointed to find out that Africa was not at all like the Tarzan movies he watched on Sunday afternoons and that he would not, in fact, have elephants and lions strolling through his backyard. He now now lives in a small village on the east coast of South Africa with his family.
 
He also wrote the Invisible Order books, and penned the upcoming humorous Middle Grade zombie series, Deadbeat Diaries. When not writing novels he works in South African television. He also freelanced on the MMO Star Wars: The Old Republic and recently wrote a comic miniseries for IDW Publishing.
 
Visit him online at wwwl.paulcrilley.com, at www.facebook.com/paul.crilley, and on Twitter @paulcrilley


More About the Author

Paul Crilley was born in Scotland in 1975 and moved to South Africa when he was eight years old. He was rather disappointed to find out that Africa was not at all like the Tarzan movies he watched on Sunday afternoons and that he would not, in fact, have elephants and lions strolling through his backyard. (Although there are plenty of monkeys.) He now lives in a small village on the east coast with his family, six cats, and one dog. He has written two fantasy novels and numerous short stories, and he also writes for South African television. (So far he has written sitcoms, dramas, soap operas, and children's CGI cartoons.) He also worked on the MMO Star Wars: The Old Republic. When he is not writing, he can be found chasing away the monkeys that like to steal food and fruit from his kitchen.

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
6
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 14 customer reviews
Very nicely written.
Jeffrey
Not only more about the main characters, Tweed and Nightingale, but for other characters that were introduced as well.
Mother/Gamer/Writer
I think that anyone who reads it will love it and I can't wait for the second book to be released.
Joy Kimberly

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Lovey Dovey Books on November 19, 2012
Format: Hardcover
London in 1895, filled with steam and Tesla powered technology, never seemed so believable until Paul Crilley's Lazarus Machine. The first Tweed & Nightingale Adventure is everything one would expect from a science-fiction mystery: intriguing, speckled with humor, and riddled with danger for its endearing detective duo. Sebastian Tweed and Octavia Nigtingale are a force to reckon with and though they come from different backgrounds, their chemistry is undeniable and fun to see come to realization.

Seventeen year old Tweed's father, a conman, is kidnapped in the middle of their latest job. The biggest suprise for Tweed is not that his father is taken, but that he's taken by a most feared criminal, Professor Moriarty. Moriarty was last heard of when he fell from Reichenbach Falls with the famous detective Sherlock Holmes, but he left behind a reputation for being a murderous criminal mastermind. On the posh side of town, Octavia, also known as Songbird, restlessly searches for her mother, who has been missing for a year. She focuses on finding out any and all information related to Moriarty which inevitably leads her to intersect paths with Tweed. Tweed and Songbird meld almost seamlessly into this evenly matched partnership to search for their missing parents. Their friendly bantering is natural and will make readers feel at home in their world. Tweed's mind is conditioned for deductive reasoning and compliments Songbird's knack for research and creating distractions.They make the most dangerous of tasks feel like exciting adventures as they delve deeper into what reveals itself to be a plot against the Crown, organized by the most powerful government agency - the Ministry.

Usually when I think of steampunk, my first thought is: limited technology.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mother/Gamer/Writer on June 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Originally Reviewed At: Mother/Gamer/Writer
Rating 4 out of 5 Controllers
Reviewer: AimeeKay

The Lazarus Machine is a very interesting Steampunk mystery.

Overall the book was filled with fun and excitement, as well as mystery. It drew me in and definitely had some parts I didn't see coming.

I liked the world that Crilley has built. I think it is a great set up for future novels. Not only more about the main characters, Tweed and Nightingale, but for other characters that were introduced as well. As for the steampunk creations that populate his world they are intriguing without being overly complicated.

I loved the characters. Sebastian and Octavia are a great pair. They come from two different levels of society and it is interesting to see how they work together. Also while the opportunity for romance is surely there, this is not a romance novel, and I think the story benefited from not delving to deep into that part of their relationship. The supporting characters are a treat as well. They story doesn't delve too deeply into some of the other characters past but they are still hold their own within the lives of the main characters. I would hope that they appear in more books about Sebastian and Octavia.

***Spoiler Alert***[Even while the technology wasn't too complicated there were a few things that I wondered about. The main thing was about Sebastian himself. (This is where the spoilerage comes in so don't say I didn't warn you.) In the beginning of the story Sebastian has memories of when he was younger, yet later on things come to light that make it impossible for him to have had those memories. It bothered me a bit because it was never explained. Maybe it is something that will happen in later novels?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition
When I saw this book on Goodreads, everything about it screamed, "Read me!" From the Doctor Who-ish cover (gas masks and overcoats, anyone?) to the awesome premise (an alternate London with steampunk machinery in 1895) this book sounded like my dream come true. Not to mention the awesome references to Sherlock Holmes! But in the end, while this was definitely a good book, it simply wasn't great.

As much as I love steampunk novels, I hate it when the machinery is confusing and difficult to understand. Perhaps other readers didn't have this problem, but I sometimes had trouble trying to understand the descriptions and imagine what was happening. Also, I could've used some more clear backstory, rather than the jumbled explanations that were thrown into the story.

I had a bit of a problem with the writing style, too. It just didn't pull me in right away, and seemed bogged down with too many descriptions. It took a while for me to really get into the story. I'd have preferred more of the witty dialogue, which I greatly enjoyed, rather than the long rambling paragraphs. And sadly, I saw a plot twist at the end coming. It was rather obvious to me from the very beginning.

Aside from these problems, however, The Lazarus Machine is very fun. I love how quirky the main character Tweed is. He's kind of like a mash-up of Sherlock and the Doctor - he's both clever and curious, and very socially awkward, which I loved. The other narrator, Octavia, was spunky and funny, and the rest of the minor characters added charm to the story.

And the dialogue - hilarious! I loved the sarcastic banter going back and forth between Tweed and Octavia. Again, this was very reminiscent of TV shows like Sherlock and Doctor Who.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews