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Lazy Man's Guide to Enlightenment Hardcover – August 28, 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Gibbs Smith, Publisher (August 28, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 158685190X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1586851903
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.4 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (121 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,463,772 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Inside Flap

Contents Introduction Author's Photographs Foreword Who Are We? Look, Ma, I'm Enlightened How to Feel Good Lifesavers How We Got Here Self-improvement Time and Vibrations Going Through Changes What is Real? How You Get There A Fable Even Lazier0

From the Back Cover

You don't have to work hard or suffer to be in paradise "I am a lazy man. Laziness keeps me from believing that enlightenment demands effort, discipline, strict diet, non-smoking, and other evidences of virture. There is a paradise in and around you right now, and to be there you don't even have to make a move. All potential experiences are within you already. You can open up to them at any time. There is an odd chance that this is what someone needs to read in order to feel better about himself. If you are a kind person and want to know what ot expect when elightenment strikes and why it comes to you, this is for you." "It's all right to have a good time. That's one of the most important messages from enlightenment." --From The Lazy Man's Guide to Enlightenment

Customer Reviews

I very much like Golas' writing style.
Shawn Regan
The recent reprint of this book has an addition of a short biography with photographs of the author.
Sphere
I read this book over 20 years ago, have bought countless copies and given them all away.
jsagert@aol.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

65 of 68 people found the following review helpful By John S. Ryan on December 31, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I've never been interested in having a guru, and Thaddeus Golas was never interested in being one. He wasn't looking for converts, followers, or even agreement, and I've always felt free to disagree with the way he makes this or that point. So this book has long been perfectly suited to me and my somewhat iconoclastic/refractory temperament.
This little book is one of a very small handful that I regard as the absolute cream of "hippie spirituality". Stephen Gaskin's _This Season's People_ is that literature's Diamond Sutra and Paul Williams's _Das Energi_ is its Tao Te Ching. Golas's slim volume comes very close to Gaskin's in its adamantine wisdom and so ranks as a close second in diamond-sutrahood, but I think of it as something like the Dhammapada.
Its message is so easy to put across that, technically, you already know everything it says. The heart of the matter is: relax; just love as much as you can from wherever you are. When you come right down to it, you're already "enlightened" and you don't have anything to prove.
But somehow, the _way_ Golas puts this message (and the bit about "love as much as you can" is a direct quotation) has some major mojo in it, enough to knock your mind loose from your brain.
Golas knew it, too. He died in 1997, but a couple of years before that, he wrote a nice long introduction to this book so that it could be republished in hardcover. It was, and this is that edition. There are also some photos of Golas, ranging from childhood to middle age. (That's good for potential buyers to know, because the full text of the original book is available online and there wouldn't be much point in getting this one if it didn't contain anything new.
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49 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Sphere on July 7, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The recent reprint of this book has an addition of a short biography with photographs of the author. Included is a letter for readers that he wrote in his last years about how the book came to be and a few added thoughts he had towards the end of his life.
What I have learned from this book is that no resistence is the way to love people with charity; with full unconditional love. If you can look at someone for what they are, with all of their strengths and weaknesses and love them regardless of what is right or wrong, in fact, love them for what they are, for what you see wrong in them too then you have discovered what many call the Christ love and are no longer drawn to and imprisoned by what you might deny.
From reading this book it has become very clear to me that we become what we hate. The very thing that we fight against is what we become. The same with our government fighting against terrorism, it has become a federal terrorist. The terrorist fighting against unjust governments have become unjust. Self appointed protectors fighting against what they perceive as protecting the innocent have become the guilty.
It always works that way.... no resistence is the only answer, love that which you would hate and you will not become that. It appears that the universe is built to teach us compassion. Hate something enough and you are drawn to it like iron to a magnet, offering your soul to the very thing which you sought to deny and in the end becoming a perfect image of that which you tried to destroy.
The big joke is that because none of us see everything the same way many of the pretty or ugly colors that you might see upon others uniquely exist in your own mind alone because you have colored them that way.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 27, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I am a lazy man too. I also like to laugh. I bought the book at a used book store before Amazon was even around. I thought it was a parody of the other arrogant "self help" books in fashion at the time.
This is the real thing. The truth in this book cuts through the jungle of spiritualism like a bolt of lightening. That was 10 years ago. I keep it by the bed on the nightstand--the ultimate anonymous, unpretentious keyhole to the way it is.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Norman G. Haase on December 5, 1997
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the book that I've given away to at least 100 individuals over the last 20 years. Of the countless books I've read on the subject of enlightenment/higher consciousness (ok, so I'm a slow learner), this little book captures all of the essentials without obfuscation, in a scant 80 pages. There was a time when I read it cover-to-cover each and every day, and I've never been so clear, expanded, loving and happy (so why did I stop, you ask? What fun is life on Earth if we can't be dense and contracted from time-to-time? <G>). I corresponded with Thaddeus for awhile back in the early '70s, and I was very impressed by his no-B/S attitude to personal growth, and the fact that he eschewed followers and self-agrandizement.

The Guide is perhaps the most honest book I've ever read and a great and loving gift to us all. Get past the '60s lingo and you have a trusted--and tested--companion for life.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Yumiko Tanaka on February 6, 2003
Format: Hardcover
If you are interested in this book, you will love it, and as you grow more loving, you can get more konwledge from this. But how about if you are not interested in it? You may say to yourself, "This is boring. I wasted my time and money. I should have bought another one." But how about if you do love yourself? Are you still not interested in this book? You may think, "I am not interested in this book, but it makes me more interested in this subject", or "Why did I try to read this book? I must be interested in leaning more about myself."
This is this book's theme. In the first example, you only focus on this book. But in the second example, you focus on yourself. And by loving yourself, you will accept everything. Loving yourself will expand your consciousness. The author says enlightenment is an experience of expanding your consciousness beyond its present limits. And he also says that the most efficient and easy way to attain enlightenment is to love everyone and everything.
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More About the Author

Born in 1924 in Paterson, New Jersey, to Polish Catholic parents, Thaddeus Golas was a child of Einstein's Relativity but also of the Great Depression.

He served a long European tour of duty in WWII, and was in Patton's Third Army in Antwerp, but narrowly avoided combat at the Battle of the Bulge. The G.I. Bill helped him earn a BA in General Humanities from New York's Columbia University where he studied under Jacques Barzun, among notable others.

He went on to work as a proofreader for Betty Ballantine, as an editor for The Tatler in Paterson, NJ., a book editor for Redbook, and later, in Oklahoma, as a sales representative for Harper & Row. He saw the rise of the Beat Movement in Manhattan, with its onset of mind-altering substances.

His ideas on human consciousness had gathered over many years of pondering Eastern Mysticism and popular Quantum Science; when he moved to California in the '60s, he was encouraged by Alan Watts, Timothy Leary, and former high school mate Allen Ginsberg to self-publish his Lazy Man's Guide to Enlightenment.

Thus, it was in the psychedelic maelstrom, in the midst of San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury turmoil at the start of the Seventies, that Thaddeus Golas achieved recognition as a major philosopher. He stood on street corners with his third wife Nancy Monroe, come rain or come shine, selling copies to passersby to make ends meet. The Lazy Man's Guide to Enlightenment caught-on like wild fire, and Golas, the reluctant guru, became a bit of a sensation.
His book remained in print for nearly 30 years.
Often shunned by members of the New Age community for his biting criticism of their manipulations, Thaddeus Golas remained a nomad and led a discreet life, declining to lecture or exploit his readers with seminars.

Twenty years after it was completed, Love and Pain, the second book by Thaddeus Golas, picks up where The Lazy Man's Guide to Enlightenment leaves off. It is a deeper investigation of his metaphysical message; a more modern and more complete look at his metaphysical map -- by some accounts his "masterpiece" !

Similarly, The Cosmic Airdrome, his third book, is a great companion to the Guide.
The Lazy Man's Life is the Biography of Thaddeus Golas.


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