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Le Morte D'Arthur: Complete Unabridged, New Illustrated Edition
 
 
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Le Morte D'Arthur: Complete Unabridged, New Illustrated Edition [Hardcover]

Sir Thomas Malory , John Matthews , Anna-Marie Ferguson
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (77 customer reviews)


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Editorial Reviews

Review

"....a beautifully illustrated edition....Anna-Marie Ferguson's pictures convey the mythic element superbly" -- Daily Express, London Newspaper, September 9, 2000

From the Author

There has been humour, heartbreak, and breathtaking visions, and the continuous excitement of trying to capture the beauty of Malory's scenes in watercolour. In the quietest moments, I liked to imagine ghosts roosting in my studio - from distant figures who may have existed and inspired the legend, to the storytellers, artists, and their creations that have served it. There are rewards in such good company and I feel most privileged to have contributed to a tradition so close to my heart, and served a world of such beauty.....beauty with a serrated edge. Anna Marie Ferguson

From the Inside Flap

The legends of King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table have inspired some of the greatest works of literature--from Cervantes's Don Quixote to Tennyson's Idylls of the King. Although many versions exist, Malory's stands as the classic rendition. Malory wrote the book while in Newgate Prison during the last three years of his life; it was published some fourteen years later, in 1485, by William Caxton. The tales, steeped in the magic of Merlin, the powerful cords of the chivalric code, and the age-old dramas of love and death, resound across the centuries.

The stories of King Arthur, Lancelot, Queen Guenever, and Tristram and Isolde seem astonishingly moving and modern. Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur endures and inspires because it embodies mankind's deepest yearnings for brotherhood and community, a love worth dying for, and valor, honor, and chivalry. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

"Le Morte d'Arthur remains an enchanted sea for
the reader to swim about in, delighting at the random beauties of fifteenth-century prose."
--Robert Graves

The legends of King Arthur and his knights of the Round Table have inspired some of the greatest works of literature--from Cervantes's Don Quixote to Tennyson's Idylls of the King. Although many versions exist, Malory's stands as the classic rendition. Malory wrote the book while in Newgate Prison during the last three years of his life; it was published some fourteen years later, in 1485, by William Caxton. The tales, steeped in the magic of Merlin, the powerful cords of the chivalric code, and the age-old dramas of love and death, resound across the centuries.
        The stories of King Arthur, Lancelot, Queen Guenever, and Tristram and Isolde seem astonishingly moving and modern. Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur endures and inspires because it embodies mankind's deepest yearnings for broth-erhood and community, a love worth dying for, and valor, honor, and chivalry.

Elizabeth J. Bryan is associate professor of English at Brown University. She is the author of Collaborative Meaning in Medieval Scribal Culture: The Otho LaZamon. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Appropriately, Anna-Marie Ferguson was born in Hampshire, in countryside rich in history and myth. She studied graphic art at Southampton College in the UK, where she ran a design studio. Since 1985, she has devoted herself to illustration, and her work has appeared in various galleries and books--particularly volumes of fairy tales. Anna-Marie served as the "Arthurian expert" on the recent NBC mini-series, Merlin.

From AudioFile

According to tradition, a rogue knight of the fifteenth century collated all the legends and songs surrounding the pre-Christian Welsh chieftain Arthur into a fascinating, rambling prose narrative. Since then it has inspired numerous artists while becoming the principal source for today's notions of chivalry and the Knights of the Round Table. Yet, for modern Americans, it's as difficult to hear as to read, despite all efforts by the brilliant Derek Jacobi in this judicious abridgment. The diction, somewhere between the English of Chaucer and Shakespeare, has been tastefully edited for comprehension, but the values and literary conventions have not. If anyone can bring such fare to life, Jacobi can--and does! Through him, we hear what once inspired the fantasies of young boys. All the psychological and moral complexities that are the author's chief concern are present, as well as the vigor and sonority of the writing. Further, Jacobi's beautiful oral expression smooths out the unevenness of the original and gives more life to the characters than Malory did. Jacobi brings out the full tragedy of Arthur's death and the dissolution of the Camelot ideal. Malory as interpreted by Jacobi is well worth the listen. Y.R. (c)AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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