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Le Silence De La Mer [Blu-ray] (1949)

 Unrated |  Blu-ray
4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)

List Price: $36.99
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Blu-ray 2-Disc Version $32.77  
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Frequently Bought Together

Le Silence De La Mer [Blu-ray] + An Honorable Man (L'aine Des Ferchaux)
Price for both: $49.72

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Product Details

  • Format: Import
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Imports
  • DVD Release Date: January 24, 2012
  • Run Time: 87.00 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B005SDDD1W
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #203,572 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

United Kingdom released, Blu-Ray/Region A/B/C : it WILL NOT play on regular DVD player. You need Blu-Ray DVD player to view this Blu-Ray DVD: LANGUAGES: English ( Dolby Digital 2.0 ), English ( Dolby DTS-HD Master Audio ), English ( Subtitles ), SPECIAL FEATURES: Black & White, Blu-Ray & DVD Combo, Booklet, Documentary, Interactive Menu, Remastered, Scene Access, Trailer(s), SYNOPSIS: Le Silence De La Mer - Jean-Pierre Melville's debut film - is an adaptation of the novella of the same title by celebrated French Resistance author Vercors (the pen name of Jean Bruller). Clandestinely written in 1942 during the Nazi occupation of France and furtively distributed, it captured the spirit of the moment, and quickly became a staple of the Resistance. Melville's cinematic adaptation - partly shot in Vercors' own house - tells the story of a German officer, Werner von Ebrennac (Howard Vernon), who is billeted to the house of an elderly man (Jean-Marie Robain) and his niece (Nicole Stéphane) in occupied France. One of the most important French films to deal with World War II, and a landmark in Melville's distinguished oeuvre, Le Silence De La Mer is a lyrical, timeless depiction of the experiences and struggles of occupation and resistance. ...The Silence of the Sea (1949) ( Le silence de la Mer ) ( El silencio del mar ) (Blu-Ray & DVD Combo)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
(12)
4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mesmerizing examination of alienation September 24, 2002
Format:VHS Tape
Le Silence De La Mer is a film that refuses to leave the viewer
unscathed. It gives us an inside look at certain variables of
War that cannot be captured by a photograph, drawn out by the
most skillful maker of maps, nor forseen by the most brilliant
strategist. It faithfully reveals that ultimately, the true
battlefield of Man is located in his own heart and mind.
The seemingly unspoken pact made by the uncle and niece to
never speak to (nor directly look at) the German intruder is at
once (strangely enough) reminiscent of the origins of a popular
form of Irish Dance. It has been said that ages ago, the occupy-
-ing British soldiers amused themselves by demanding that the
Irish spontaneously dance. This bit of sport could take place
in the marketplace, on a country road; in short, anywhere at any
time. In their inner outrage, the Irish chose to rob the dance
of genuine expression by holding their arms fast to their sides,
stiffening the upper body. What the uncle and the niece in the
film choose to hold stiff is their tongues.... In understanding
the vicissitudes of Life at War, their actions (or truthfully
their "inaction") are not remarkable. What is remarkable is
that what is designed to expose the inhumanity of the Nazi
Officer actually serves to reveal the depth of his humanity.
In our social interactions, we hastily apologize if we
find that inadvertently, we position our back to someone with
whom we are engaged in earnest conversation. Picture if you
will, literally addressing the backs of people with whom you
share the same roof night after night.....
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I bid you good night." July 25, 2008
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
Jean-Pierre Melville's Le Silence de la Mer now seems an atypical work in light of his later, more widely-known gangster films, but this 1949 adaptation of Vercors' hugely popular WW2 novella can lay claim to having influenced both Robert Bresson and the Nouvelle Vague filmmakers both in terms of its style and its production. The book was written under an assumed name by Jean Bruller and published by a (literal) French underground press during the Occupation, and it's a surprising work to have been written during the war, not demonising its central German character but rather making a kind of plea for understanding - but not understanding the enemy, rather making him understand why even his best and idealistic assumptions are so wrong.

The story is simplicity itself: Howard Vernon's German officer is billeted at a French farmhouse where the owner (Jean-Marie Robain) and his niece (Nicole Stéphane) resist in the only way they can - by refusing to say a single word to him. Introduced as a figure out of a horror film yet transformed in the same shot into a less threatening figure the moment he crosses their hearth, he's not a stereotypical Nazi thug, but rather a more sensitive and naively idealistic figure. Soft spoken and polite, he never imposes his will on his reluctant hosts but rather tries to win them over through conversation, never losing his temper at their refusal to respond like a patient suitor. He dreams of a marriage between Germany and France that will take both nations to a higher level, achieving through the reluctant use of force what pre-war politicians failed to do with diplomacy. He doesn't want an empty conquest but, rather, wants France to come willingly to its embrace.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mesmerizing examination of alienation September 24, 2002
Format:VHS Tape
Le Silence De La Mer is a film that refuses to leave the viewer
unscathed. It gives us an inside look at certain variables of
War that cannot be captured by a photograph, drawn out by the
most skillful maker of maps, nor forseen by the most brilliant
strategist. It faithfully reveals that ultimately, the true
battlefield of Man is located in his own heart and mind.
The seemingly unspoken pact made by the uncle and niece to
never speak to (nor directly look at) the German intruder is at
once (strangely enough) reminiscent of the origins of a popular
form of Irish Dance. It has been said that ages ago, the occupy-
-ing British soldiers amused themselves by demanding that the
Irish spontaneously dance. This bit of sport could take place
in the marketplace, on a country road; in short, anywhere at any
time. In their inner outrage, the Irish chose to rob the dance
of geunine expression by holding their arms fast to their sides,
stiffening the upper body. What the uncle and the niece in the
film choose to hold stiff is their tongues.... In understanding
the vicissitudes of Life at War, their actions (or truthfully
their "inaction") are not remarkable. What is remarkable is
that what is designed to expose the inhumanity of the Nazi
Officer actually serves to reveal the depth of his humanity.
In our social interactions, we hastily apologize if we
find that inadvertently, we position our back to someone with
whom we are engaged in earnest conversation. Picture if you
will, literally addressing the backs of people with whom you
share the same roof night after night.....
Read more ›
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars adequate job of portraying a challenging novella on the screen
Jean-Pierre Melville's rendition does the Vercors novella justice, but only partially conveys the tensions, emotions, and tested loyalties of passive-resistant citizens and their... Read more
Published 18 months ago by dmm
4.0 out of 5 stars JEAN-PIERRE MELVILLE, OPUS ONE
One of these films that stay for days in your head after you've seen it. Like The Uncle and The Niece, you'll be hypnotized by Werner von Ebrennac's thoughts about Europa, Art and... Read more
Published on February 23, 2012 by Daniel S.
1.0 out of 5 stars a dated movie
For the majority part of the 88 minutes long movie, there is only the German officer's monologue while the other 2 actors mouths shut all the time. Read more
Published on May 7, 2011 by mo
5.0 out of 5 stars Spare but Powerful Tale of Occupiers/Colonizers and Occupied/Colonized
Virtually the entire film is shot within the French house (the author, Vercors, own). With its shelves of French classics, the house functions as a symbol of French culture. Read more
Published on May 7, 2010 by Doug Anderson
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the original
This is a Korean version which, I am told, was harshly edited from the French original.
Published on March 24, 2010 by Michael Stern
5.0 out of 5 stars French classic
Although this is a World War II war movie, it's also a relationship movie where only one character really talks. Read more
Published on October 11, 2009 by Paul Kao
4.0 out of 5 stars Blanket Guilt - Blanket Innocence
There is nothing subtle about the message in this movie. It starts out with a gentle but blatant rebuke of Germans for allowing Nazism to take over. Read more
Published on September 22, 2007 by J. A. Eyon
5.0 out of 5 stars Two clashing visions but the common love for the culture!
An emblematic script shows us a long preamble where the silence plays an important place, being by itself another invisible actor. Read more
Published on September 14, 2005 by Hiram Gomez Pardo
5.0 out of 5 stars An essential film
The first film of melville, is definetly an essential one for WW2 and the european reistence in Europe, invaded by nazis during WW2. Read more
Published on June 5, 2001
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