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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent
The title of this book made me want to read it. The first two sentences made me want to read it even more. In his foreword, Mark Driscoll writes: "Pastor Dave Kraft is in the right season of life to write this book. By the time this book is published he will be seventy years of age" (p. 11). That was enough to make want to listen, and listen hard, to what this man had to...
Published on July 22, 2010 by Brian G Hedges

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Actually, 2 1/2 Stars
Dave Kraft has been in Christian ministry for over forty years. He has served as a mentor and teacher to other aspiring leaders, and he continues in that capacity even into his early 70s.

For these reasons, I very eagerly anticipated reading his book "Leaders Who Last."

While there is much to like--especially in the area of practical wisdom--I can...
Published 8 months ago by Gregory P. Hoadley


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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, July 22, 2010
By 
Brian G Hedges (South Bend, Indiana) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Leaders Who Last (Paperback)
The title of this book made me want to read it. The first two sentences made me want to read it even more. In his foreword, Mark Driscoll writes: "Pastor Dave Kraft is in the right season of life to write this book. By the time this book is published he will be seventy years of age" (p. 11). That was enough to make want to listen, and listen hard, to what this man had to say. So, I read the book in three different sittings in a thirty-six hour time frame. I'm glad I did.

Dave Kraft is a good writer, with a simple, straightforward style. The book is clear and confident. Kraft knows what he wants to say to leaders and says it. I was immediately drawn in with the book's clear flow-of-thought, which is evident from the contents.

Part One: Foundations
Chapter 1. The Leader's Power
Chapter 2. The Leader's Purpose
Chapter 3. The Leader's Passion
Chapter 4. The Leader's Priorities
Chapter 5. The Leader's Pacing

Part Two: Formation
Chapter 6. The Leader's Calling
Chapter 7. The Leader's Gifts
Chapter 8. The Leader's Character
Chapter 9. The Leader's Growth

Part Three: Fruitfulness
Chapter 10. The Leader's Vision
Chapter 11. The Leader's Influence
Chapter 12. The Leader's Legacy

The chapters are short, to the point, and seasoned with good illustrations and striking quotations of leaders from a variety of different contexts. For example, here's a great quotation about character from the legendary coach, John Wooden: "Be more concerned with your character than with your reputation, because your character is what you really are while your reputation is merely what others think you are" (p. 98). There are lots of these leadership maxims scattered through the book, so read with a highlighter handy. You'll want to remember some of these.

But even more important is the wisdom with which Dave Kraft writes. One gets the sense in reading these pages that he is a man who has lived intentionally and maintained a learning posture throughout his life. His insights and convictions come through loud and clear and without apology. Here are a few that caught my attention. (Keep in mind that this is a book written primarily for people in Christian leadership.)

* "Leadership begins and ends with a clear understanding of the gospel and being rooted in the grace of Jesus Christ as a gift." (p. 29)

* "It is vitally important that each of us discovers his own pathway to deep intimacy with the Lord Jesus Christ." (p. 32)

* "Passion will have more of an impact than personality." (p. 50)

* "If a person's gift mix is not predominantly in the speaking category, that person should not consider a major leadership role." (p. 89)

* "A lifelong learner asks all kinds of questions, reads broadly, writes down new ideas, learns from opposing thoughts, and is growing in Christian character." (p. 113)

* "Be careful with whom you spend the bulk of your time. A leader influences many by investing in a few and letting those few influence the rest." (p. 128)

* "Today, the crying need is for more leaders. To grow by addition, you recruit more followers. To grow by multiplication, you add more leaders." (p. 139)

And, the most importance sentence in the book (for me): "If you need people, you can't lead people." Now that's a hard saying, but a very important insight. The following sentences puts in context. "There is an inability or lack of desire to make the tough calls, speak the truth, or do the hard things. Motivated by a fear of disappointing people, this inability will seriously hamper and work against your ability to lead." (p. 132)

These, however, are just a few of the gems found in this wise and helpful book. Most of the chapters also include helpful, practical advice about how to implement the principles being taught. For example, the chapter on priorities (building on the previous chapters) outlines an eight step process for determining how and where to spend your time, moving you through purpose, passion, goals, plans, priorities, schedule, execution, and evaluation. It's a fairly simple approach, but it's doable - as is all the other advice Kraft gives.

So, I highly recommend this book. Though it is a brief book and doesn't say everything that can or should be said about leadership, what it does say is said well and sticks. Kraft's Leaders Who Last has a quality similar to J. Oswald Sanders' classic Spiritual Leadership from a generation ago. If I could summarize what I appreciate most about this book into three brief things it would be these: (1) There is a strong emphasis on depth of personal devotion to Jesus, out of which flows everything else. (2) There is a strong emphasis on multiplying other leaders. (3) It is written by someone who has done it for over forty years. `Nough said.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book!, March 9, 2010
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This review is from: Leaders Who Last (Paperback)
Dave Kraft's book "Leaders who last" is one of the best books on leadership, I have read read. Having read Maxwell and others in this genre this book sets itself above the rest in the following ways: 1) Kraft is a leader at Mars Hill Church one of the fastest growing churches, 2) Kraft is actively engaged in pastoral ministry and training leaders, 3) Kraft writes from a biblical worldview, and finally Kraft explains concepts biblically but draws from his many years of experience. Leaders who last is an excellent book for Pastors, but also for every Christian. Every Christian should learn to be intentional in following Jesus in every area of life. While Kraft's aim is to instruct leaders and those in full time Christian ministry, I believe his book is helpful for every Christian, which is why I recommend every Christian leader. Part Three on Fruitfulness of "Leaders who last" was especially helpful as I do a lot of coaching of leaders and future leaders in my ministry. This section has lead me to pursue future training in the field of coaching. To wrap up this review, this book is one I will be recommending other Pastors, leaders, and future leaders in the Body of Christ to read, and is also why I gave it 5 stars!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Leaders Who Last, March 25, 2011
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This review is from: Leaders Who Last (Paperback)
C.H. Spurgeon writes, "Beware of no man more than yourself; we carry our worst enemies within us." Spurgeon poignantly alerts us to the danger of indwelling sin. The writer of Hebrews warns against that sin; the "sin that so easily entangles" (Heb. 12:1a). Tragically, many Christian leaders fail to heed the warning of Spurgeon and the book of Hebrews. Theological compromise leads to liberalism. Moral compromise leads to immorality. Few Christian leaders, as a result, finish strong.

Leaders Who Last by Dave Kraft serves Christian leaders well by turning their attention to the standards set forth in the Word of God. Kraft writes, "The greatest and most pressing need in the body of Christ today is an army of leaders who have a vision of a desired future and are called and anointed by God. These leaders possess a fire burning in their hearts that can't be extinguished. They are motivated and led by God to intentionally, passionately, and effectively influence others."

Kraft argues that leaders (and pastors in particular) have four key responsibilities, namely, shepherding, developing, equipping, and empowering. Three sections provide a helpful framework for developing the author's argument.

PART ONE: FOUNDATIONS

Kraft presents five areas that should characterize the life of every leader. The center hub represents the power of Christ. Four additional spokes make up the "leadership wheel" and include purpose, passion, priorities, and pacing.

"Leadership" writes Kraft, "begins and ends with a clear understanding of the gospel and being rooted in the grace of Jesus Christ as a free gift." I might build on the author's presupposition by adding that no amount of talent, speaking ability, giftedness, or charisma can replace a working knowledge of the biblical gospel. So many churches appear successful on the outside. Some Christian leaders and pastors (especially some young pastors) appear to have it all together on the outside. But when the gospel is compromised and the core truths of the Christian faith are neglected, tragic results are waiting around the corner! When a pastor begins to compromise the doctrine of hell, the exclusive claim of Christ, or the authority of God's Word he willingly embraces a "different gospel" (Gal. 1:6-8). The leadership foundation must be established for any kind of tenure in ministry. And Kraft does an excellent job developing the "leadership wheel."

PART TWO: FORMATION

In part two, the author narrows his focus. He discusses the leader's calling, gifts, character, and growth. Finishing well should be a high priority for every Christian leader. Kraft presents five helpful suggestions for achieving this important goal:

1. Maintain a vibrant relationship with Christ.

2. A posture of learning.

3. Identifiable goals and self-control.

4. Supportive personal relationships and family.

5. Clear vision, strong biblical convictions, perspective, and surrendering to the lordship of Christ.

PART THREE: FRUITFULNESS

Part three summarizes the leader's vision, influence, and legacy. The section on vision is especially helpful. Kraft writes, "A leader is a person who is dissatisfied with the way things are. He has a God-given burden, a vision, and a call to see something different. He wants to see something change, to build a new future. He then begins to communicate what he thinks and where he wants to go."

Kraft is calling for visionary leaders to step up to the plate; leaders who have a "destination in mind and possess the ability to take others along on the journey." He makes a strong case for visionary leadership. These leaders must:

1. Develop the vision.

2. Communicate the vision.

3. Implement the vision.

Leaders Who Last is a book that every pastor should read, absorb, and put into practice. Dave Kraft writes with the heart of a pastor and clearly communicates essential leadership skills that should be included in the makeup of every Christian leader. Every leader who intends on finishing strong needs to read Kraft's book. The principles are biblical and practical. No theory here. Highly recommended!

[.]
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Actually, 2 1/2 Stars, July 23, 2013
By 
Gregory P. Hoadley (Ocala, FL United States) - See all my reviews
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Dave Kraft has been in Christian ministry for over forty years. He has served as a mentor and teacher to other aspiring leaders, and he continues in that capacity even into his early 70s.

For these reasons, I very eagerly anticipated reading his book "Leaders Who Last."

While there is much to like--especially in the area of practical wisdom--I can only give this book 2 1/2 stars. In the following paragraphs, I will explain why.

To begin, let me mention four things that make "Leaders Who Last" worthwhile reading.

First, Kraft maintains that Christian leaders must maintain a vibrant devotional life. He makes it clear that if they are to lead the flock, pastors must be in God's Word themselves. This will directly impact his walk, his character, and the decisions he makes. This is exactly correct.

Second, Kraft maintains that leaders need to create a purpose statement; in other words, a simple, straightforward vision for their ministry. This is vitally important, and is often overlooked. Kraft's section on this was helpful for me in that it helped to provide clarity for my own ministry.

Third, the author hits a vital note on how Christian leaders need to delegate to implement their vision. This is crucial for two reasons: first, the pastor cannot possibly do it all on his own. As Scriptural proof, Kraft points to the example of how Jethro told his son-in-law Moses to choose men to help him with the needs of the many people as they were wandering through the wilderness.

Because burnout is so common amongst pastors today, Kraft deserves kudos for bringing this up.

The second reason why delegation is so important is that this helps pastors and elders to develop the leaders for tomorrow. Directly connected to this, a major part of the leader's legacy is that he is able to carry the vision into following generations--a recurring theme in this volume.

Fourth, Kraft finds it essential that leaders must finish well. This is very much in line with Paul's statement in 2 Timothy 4 that he "fought the good fight, finished the race, and kept the faith." Far too many pastors have burned out--usually because they got into ministry when they clearly did not have the calling, or fell into sin.

There are many sub-points within these strengths that I will not get into here. Suffice to say, leaders will benefit from these wise and practical insights.

However, "Leaders Who Last" has three major problems that prohibit me from giving it a full endorsement.
First and most glaring, there is no exegesis of the biblical texts on church offices like 1 Timothy 3 and Titus 1. One would think that this would be essential for a book on Christian leadership, but here, it is absent. This is a startling omission, given the subject matter.

Second, Kraft spends a great deal of time talking about leaders "developing a vision." He posits that "you need to have a dream, a vision from God." But if you are not a visionary, Kraft says you need to "think in terms of recruiting or hiring a visionary team to whom you can defer."

There are numerous problems with this: for starters, how is one to know if that vision is biblical? Granted, one must assume that this is the case, given that it is in a book on Christian leadership. But Kraft offers precious few guidelines on this.

Additionally, where in the Scripture does one find that the elders--God's appointed men to oversee the church--should defer to a "visionary team"? How do you know if those on the "visionary team" meet the qualifications of 1 Timothy 3 and Titus 1?

A final point on this criticism: whatever happened to the simple preaching of the Word and administration of the Sacraments? These are the tasks which Christ gave His church officers to fulfill. While they might seem mundane, the fact that they are Scripturally mandated should end all discussion about their centrality in ministry. While I am certain that Kraft would agree, he is not nearly clear enough about it.

Third, Kraft warns against leaders spending "too much time" counseling hurting people. Granted, pastors should allocate their time wisely; they do need to take their time in preparing sermons and developing leaders as well. It is also true that deacons do assist in caring for the needy.

However, it is also true that a vital role for pastors is to spend time with the needy in the congregation. Since he is their shepherd, they may need extra help from him. I have found that in my ministry, the time that I spend with the more needy helps me with my other duties: it makes me more sensitive, it frees me from pride, it keeps me service-oriented, and it helps my preaching in that I can better minister to all from God's Word. Far too much is lost in ministry when, as Kraft puts it, "effective leaders [bring] counselors onto their staffs or [refer] out counseling needs."

In short, "Leaders Who Last" has some good things to say on the topic. Dave Kraft is a wise man with a great deal of experience, and he should be listened to.

That said, I found this volume to be a mild disappointment. I wish he would have spent more time on what the Bible says about this topic--most especially 1 Timothy 3 and Titus 1. For this reason, I can only recommend this volume as a supplement to other books on this subject. Far better works include Martin Bucer's "Concerning the True Care of Souls," Charles Spurgeon's "Lectures To My Students," and "The Christian Ministry" by Charles Bridges.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Leaders Who Last by Dave Kraft, March 29, 2011
This review is from: Leaders Who Last (Paperback)
Being in leadership I want to learn as much as I can from people who have been in leadership. I want to learn from their successes and failures. So when my pastor recommended Dave Kraft's book Leaders Who Last I ordered immediately.

In this book Kraft writes clearly and makes his points well. As to the content it wasn't until the last section of the book that I began disagree with him on leadership (more on that later).

The opening lines of the introduction set up the book wonderfully - "This book is about finishing your leadership race. It is a marathon, not a hundred-meter-dash." What follows is a how-to guide on finishing the leadership race that God has called leaders to run. Drawing from Scriptures and experience Kraft shows us what it means to be a leader.

Kraft's definition of a leader is as follows - "A Christian leader is a humble, God-dependent, team-playing servant of God who is called by God to shepherd, develop, equip, and empower a specific group of believers to accomplish an agreed-upon vision from God."

Kraft, drawing from thirty years' experience, gives details on how to fulfill that definition of a leader. He categorizes the responsibilities of a leader into three parts - foundations, formation and fruitfulness.

The section on foundations deals with a leader's personal growth and how he develops as a leader. He begins with this statement - "Because leading is a reflection of who you are, you lead from the inside out."

How true this is. Like every aspect of our Christian life we are changed and developed from the inside out. He takes it a step further by saying - "As a leader, everything I am and everything I do needs to be anchored in my identity in Christ."

After going into this in detail he devotes a chapter in the section on foundations to a leaders pacing. Too often leaders try to do everything and get overextended. Health problems will/can occur. Close relationships get strained. To guard against this he argues that leaders need to take regular time off to reenergize.

He moves onto the formation of a leader. He spends a good amount of time on being called which is paramount in being a good leader. We tend to put people in positions of leadership when they in no way have been called. That is a recipe for disaster.

He finishes with fruitfulness. This section is where I began to disagree with Kraft. Throughout the book Kraft mixes Scripture and personal experience fairly well. In this section he directs us to very little Scripture to make his points and instead relies heavily on experience. He places much of the success and failures a leader experiences on the leader himself. Yet we see in Scripture that leaders can and do fail because of no fault of their own (Noah and Jeremiah are prime examples of leaders doing God's work yet saw literally no fruit of their labors).

With that said I would recommend this book to any leader. He will challenge you evaluate your understanding of a leader and the role a leader plays in God's church.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A lifetime of leadership wisdom in 150 pages, May 24, 2010
This review is from: Leaders Who Last (Paperback)
Not another book on leadership! Yes and no. Yes, it is another book on leadership; but no, not just another book on leadership. This is an exceptional book on leadership, especially on pastoral leadership, and easily finds a place in my top three leadership books.

What stands out is Dave Kraft's experience. The book exudes the maturity of Kraft's 70 years of life, 50 years of following Christ, and 40 years of Christian leadership. It is a book written from the realistic trenches of long Christian service, and bears the unmistakable stamp of a humble Christian man who longs to leave a valuable legacy of leadership wisdom to the Church of Christ.

Kraft begins by identifying a major problem: only 30% of leaders last, or finish well. But instead of mistakenly concluding, "See, the church should not have leaders," Kraft's biblical premise is, "that you can learn how to be a good leader and finish your particular leadership race well."

The first section covers the leader's foundations. Kraft uses a memorable hub illustration to show how Jesus Christ is the foundation of the leader's power, purpose, passion, priorities, and pacing. In the chapter dealing with the leader's purpose, Kraft relates how, in the office of his daughter's high school counselor, he read a motto that was to change his life: "Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay awhile, and leave footprints on our hearts, and we are never the same." That produced a prayer in Kraft's heart, "Lord, make me a person who leaves footprints in people's lives. I don't want to be a person who comes and goes with no lasting impact. Because of contact with me, may people never be the same again. May I be a person who intentionally and lastingly influences others." And that prayer birthed Kraft's purpose statement: "To leave footprints in the hearts of God-hungry leaders who multiply."

The second main section is the leader's formation. Here Kraft deals with calling, gifts, character, and growth. These chapters demonstrate Kraft's ability to combine the inspirational with the practical. Some books are inspiring, but you walk away thinking, "That's amazing....eh, what do I do now?" Other books are so full of step-by-step formulas that you slump defeated and powerless before you even take step one. Kraft is both inspirational and practical. He motivates and empowers, but also leads you through the steps required to turn aspiration into reality.

The third is the leader's fruitfulness, and this is where Kraft demonstrates the immeasurably huge potential of godly leadership to impact and influence the rising generations. So often leaders can get bogged down in day-to-day administration and crisis management, but Kraft calls us to look much further than the horizon of today, this week, or even this year. He challenges leaders to pour their lives into future leaders: exhort the eager beginner, empower the struggling learner, encourage the cautious contributor, entrust to the independent learner.

It's been a long time since I have read such a well-written and well-edited book. With hardly a wasted word, a lifetime of profound leadership wisdom has been packed into 150 pages. You can probably read it in a few hours, but you will read it again...and again. It has the potential to change the rest of your life. And, hopefully, through you many other lives will be changed too - both for time and eternity.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Leadership Firecracker, April 30, 2012
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This review is from: Leaders Who Last (Paperback)
This book is probably the most practical book on leadership I have ever read. Dave is over seventy years old, and he is still passionate about coaching leaders and developing them into stronger ones (he has been a leadership coach for decades). He uses personal anecdotes to illustrate a lot of his points, like how he mentions he writes everything down or else he forgets what he wants to write. Again, this book is extremely practical, and Kraft lays out a lot of outlines and structures for the leadership methods he prescribes.

With 160 pages of juicy goodness, this book is a quick read, not to mention the author's passion about the subject make his ideas flow like water. It's so easy to read that I actually had to stop myself several times so I could sit back and digest some of his thoughts.

One thing I will say to keep in mind is this: as the book gets toward its end, the subject matter becomes somewhat focused. Dave talks a lot about personal qualities of who [in his experience] he views as ministry leaders, and I can see how a small minority of readers may feel slightly left out or out-of-place.

However, here's the big idea -- have you been wondering what your purpose is for God's kingdom? Have you been wanting to find more practical ways to discipline yourself in your devotional time? Have you been wondering about great ways to coach and disciple someone in your life? Then get this book. I'll tell you it is a little firecracker. It will open up areas in your life where you can develop as a leader.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for young leaders!, January 19, 2011
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This review is from: Leaders Who Last (Paperback)
Leaders are a dime a dozen. People who get into ministry are too numerous to count. But how many of them last for the long haul.... very few. I have been in ministry 22 years and have seen most of my college and seminary ministry buddies drop out of ministry for various reasons (moral failure, burn-out, lost interest, emotional hurts, etc.) Some thought it was going to be easy. Others thought they could do it simply because they had some natural ability and talents. All is futile with out God and wisdom. Here is an author who speaks with conviction and from expereince. I appreciate him sharing his wisdom. We need more pastors who lean into God more and last longer by His grace. Thanks for writing this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Own, April 28, 2010
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If you are involved in any type of church leadership this book is a must own. As an Elder at my church, it is my hope that as Session we will read this book next, followed by our staff and Committee leaders. Like other reviews have said, it is a book I carry everywhere. Its a clear, concise, easy read, but challenging and full of wisdom. For more about this author read his blog [...]
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Helpful Ministry Strategies, August 30, 2012
This review is from: Leaders Who Last (Paperback)
Leaders Who Last by Dave Kraft is a short, helpful book on leadership skills and strategies in a ministry context.

The author serves on the staff of Mars Hill Church in Seattle, under lead pastor Mark Driscoll. According to the foreword, Dave Kraft was able to help Driscoll significantly at certain points of his ministry, serving as his personal "ministry coach." Accordingly, I think his book will also help others who lead in ministry, although probably to a limited extent.

Regardless of what you think of the controversial Mark Driscoll (I happen to admire his ministry) the fact that Kraft served as one of his mentors is impressive: Mars Hill is an world-class behemoth of multi-site church campuses, outreach, mission, church planting, and contemporary strategy.

I approached this book thinking, "If Kraft could help Driscoll during a near burn-out phase, I am sure that he will be able to help me in my small 380-member congregation." He did. To a marginal degree.

While it will probably not become one of the enduring textbooks on leadership any time soon, Leaders Who Last does bring several of the primary facets of leadership to the fore: i.e. power, purpose, passion, priorities, and pacing. In this first major section, Kraft focuses on one's relationship with the Lord, time management (a constant challenge to all in leadership positions) and workday planning. Nothing completely original here, though.

Some of Kraft's guide-points in the latter half of the work are more valuable. For instance, his section on spending time developing future leaders and core staff rather than "draining people" (chapter 11) was helpful to me. Too, Kraft has a wise section on the importance of the pastor communicating his vision for the church (chapter 10) although Kraft does not at any point define what a "vision for the future" might look like, or provide an example of what he means by the term.

The book is filled with helpful nuggets and quotations throughout ("I have never heard of a statue in a park dedicated to a committee," p. 122. "It has been said that if you don't plan your life, someone will plan it for you," p. 136). But somehow I ended the book thinking I would rather have spent time with Dave Kraft the man, rather than Dave Kraft the author.

I am sure his wisdom would have a more profound effect on my own ministry context if I was able take the discussion out of generalities, and into more specifics!

Matthew Everhard is the Senior Pastor of Faith Evangelical Presbyterian Church in Brooksville, Fl.
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Leaders Who Last by Dave Kraft (Paperback - February 3, 2010)
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