Buy Used
$3.96
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Dust jacket in Has dustjacket condition.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Leading Without Power: Finding Hope in Serving Community (J-B US non-Franchise Leadership) Hardcover – September 19, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0787910631 ISBN-10: 0787910635 Edition: 1st

Used
Price: $3.96
25 New from $2.60 147 Used from $0.01 3 Collectible from $0.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$2.60 $0.01

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Series: J-B US non-Franchise Leadership (Book 400)
  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Jossey-Bass; 1 edition (September 19, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0787910635
  • ISBN-13: 978-0787910631
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,150,715 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Max De Pree, former CEO of Herman Miller and author of two bestselling books that look at business in a decidedly nontraditional manner, now turns his attention to nonprofits and the way they bring out the best in people. Leading Without Power: Finding Hope in Serving Community addresses the possibility of managing through inspiration rather than domination by drawing a distinction between "organizations" and "movements." While some may argue that his theories are a bit too touchy-feely, De Pree's successful corporate background proves that there is more to his ideas than mere rhetorical bombast.

Review

?This is a book to be read, re-read, shared widely within any organization. Every chapter has pictures for our mind that will remain vivid long after the book is closed. A vibrant testament to human potential, the why of work.? (Frances Hesselbein, president and CEO, The Drucker Foundation)

?Here is Max De Pree at his best, and that is very good indeed. In Leading Without Power, De Pree shows us why we cannot master the how-to-dos of effective leadership without also being clear about what leaders?and followers?must be. In doing so, he not only provides us with much practical wisdom about creative leading and organizational health, he also nurtures our souls. This is a book to be savored by all who care about such things as vision, faithfulness, trust, and hope.? (Richard J. Mouw, president, Fuller Theological Seminary)

?Being CEO of a non-profit organization is not so much a job as it is a love affair. Why keep at it if it is just going to limp along? Like any love story, my work may have its struggles, and Max De Pree provides the practical help, inspiration, and encouragement that keep me focused and motivated. But he also adds poetry, art and dance to the work, and to the way I work.? (Stephen A. Hayner, president, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship)

"A rich source of leadership wisdom that speaks to the needs of school leaders today." (The School Administrator)


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

It just didn't feel quite right to me.
Thomas Bradshaw
Although written with non-profits in mind, the book speaks to universal truths and eternal concepts -- things that bring fulfillment and meaning to any kind of work.
Dan J. Sanders
Don't confuse willingness with competence.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 12, 1999
Format: Hardcover
After having read "Leadership is an Art", and "Leadership Jazz", I didn't have an idea that this book would have such a significant impact on my thoughts. Working for a non-profit, this book is such a wonderful guide about what it takes to lead an organization that is more concerned about people and less about profit. This doesn't mean that profit is not important, but what the author does say is that there is a considerable amount of heart and soul that goes into the non-profit sector. I especially recommend the section entitled "What shall we measure." DePree looks at key indicators from a perspective that should be imitated by any company that really wants to captivate its customers and employees. The explanation about the difference between a "movement" and "organization" is also spectacular. A great guide for the future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By "areaderfromusa" on October 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
De Pree presents a philosophy that while in many ways is timeless, is never a cliche. His emphasis upon people, their potential, and the elements present in strong, enduring organizations, will appeal to leaders working in any industry. De Pree offers the reader refreshing thoughts about the importance of service to others in an era of forgotten virtues. It is one of the most elegant and inspiring books I have come across lately.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dan J. Sanders on January 11, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is among the best books on leadership ever written. I keep a copy next to my computer at the office and I also have one next to my laptop in the study -- the book is a reference guide for me almost daily. Although written with non-profits in mind, the book speaks to universal truths and eternal concepts -- things that bring fulfillment and meaning to any kind of work. I believe chapter two (What's a Movement?) is the best business book chapter of content I've ever read. It speaks to the importance of higher purpose thinking. Buy it. You'll be glad you did. Buy a bunch and hand them out. They'll be glad you did.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Bradshaw on September 29, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I can see where the author is coming from, and I think I see what he wants to say. The problem? He rambles. A lot. Stories of his experiences as the CEO of Herman Miller and his vacations seem to crop up every few paragraphs, and more than a few seem only tenuously connected to the subject matter. I also spotted several plugs for books that he enjoyed without even an explanation as to why he enjoyed them or how they relate to what he's talking about. With all the name-dropping he did, I imagine it was a favor for a friend. It just didn't feel quite right to me.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 12, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I ordered this book because I read Leadership Jazz and liked it quite a bit. I am heavily involved in a non-profit and thought there would be new and novel ideas in this book that would help me be a leader. Particularly, how to get things done through others when you don't have much power.

I was actually disappointed. I found the book to be way philosophical -- so laden with concepts such as Justice, Grace, Truth, Authenticity etcetera without clear definitions of what the author means by them in a non-profit or even for-profit context. These ideas were also in Leadership Jazz, but were not as focal as in Leading without Power. Perhaps that was his intent -- to make it like scripture so you can create your own meaning. He indicates he spaced each sentence and gave margin space for making notes -- perhaps so readers can record their own references to personal experience that help internalize the concepts.

I also found myself reading many ideas I found in Leadership jazz, such as the importance of measurement, trust, respect and civility, etcetera.

He did say a few things, though, that made it worth the price of admission:

1. Don't confuse willingness with competence.
2. Getting the right person in the right position is just as important in a non-profit as in a for-profit organization.
3. Don't tell competent people how to do their jobs as this only destroys trust and communicates disrespect.
4. Competence in developing relationships is critical in a non-profit.
5. Non-profits can be places of healing. I never thought of it that way -- that people heal from their life's experiences when they contribute in environments of trust and respect.

I will keep the book, and did underscore a lot of passages. I feel it is highly conceptual though, and would have the most meaning to people who have significant life's experiences to relate to the concepts he shares.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?