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Leaf Storm: and Other Stories (Perennial Classics) Paperback – February 1, 2005

4.2 out of 5 stars 11 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"For Garcí a Má rquez the world contains mysteries that we need and can easily live with, but also miracles that we cannot understand, that speak for forces unknown to men. 'Leaf Storm, ' then, brings together both Garcí a Má rquez's early and late styles. The former deserves our respect; the latter requires our celebration."-- Peter S. Prescott, "Newsweek""To call these allegories would be to suggest that they are 'symbolic' somehow and perhaps plainly stated. They ore not; the texture is that of the prose poem, and the intention a restatement of religious belief. But the feeling one comes away with is that of enchantment, which is a sense of having endured terror and magic." -- Paul Theroux, "Chicago Tribune""Garcí a Má rquez has extraordinary strength and firmness of imagination and writes with the calmness of a man who knows exactly what wonders he can perform. Strange things happen in the land of Má rquez. As with Emerson, Poe, Hawthorne, every sentence breaks the silence of a vast emptiness, the famous New World 'solitude' that is the unconscious despair of his characters but the sign of Má rquez's genius." -- Alfred Kazin, "The New York Times Book Review"

Language Notes

Text: English (translation)
Original Language: Spanish --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Series: Perennial Classics
  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial; Reissue edition (February 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006075155X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060751555
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.4 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #321,988 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I loved this novella and the short stories that were included in the volume.
"Leaf Storm" isn't a conventionally plotted novella. Instead, it's more of a dreamy and dreamlike character study of three people and their reactions to the suicide (or possible murder) of the town outcast and recluse. When the novella ends, we are left with many unanswered questions, but still, we feel fulfilled for we sense there are things about this suicide/murder that it's best simply not to know.
I have to disagree with opinions that Gregory Rabassa didn't do a good job with the translation. I think he did a superb job. He not only translated the story for us, he managed to capture the rain-soaked, steamy melancholy that is the essence of Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Rabassa is well-known as having been one of the world's premier translators and it's easy to see why.
I loved the two fantasy stories, "The Hansomest Drowned Man in the World" and "A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings." They are filled with the brand of magical realism that only Gabo can write and are just wonderful. I also liked "Monologue of Isabel Watching it Rain in Macondo" and "Ghost Ship."
This book gives us a glimpse into the world of Macondo and it's a very seductive glimse indeed.
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Format: Paperback
'Leaf Storm' is known as the first novella published by Gabriel García Márquez. And from this debut is possible to see how big he would become one day. This book tells a very simple story that acquires multiple levels as it is told.

After the death of an infamous doctor of Macondo his only friends, this friend's daughter and her son gather to the funerals. The dead man is known as the devil and everyone hates him. His death made the city very happy. As the story is unfolded, we learn why he's so hated and how come the threesome ended up there to mourn him.

Using multiple points of views, Gabo gives the three protagonists chances to speak to themselves and we can find out how dreadful is to each of one be there. The writer is able to switch the point of view, and also the language --after all, a little boy does not speak as an old man. This is one of the remarkable qualities of this wonderful novella.

This is the very first time that the imaginary place Macondo appears in Gabo's story and it became a seminal place of his stories --among them the masterpiece 'A Hundred years of solitude'.
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Format: Paperback
... which was actually the initial prelude. I've read a number of the works of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, most notably, his classic One Hundred Years of Solitude (Harper Perennial Modern Classics) as well as Love in the Time of Cholera (Oprah's Book Club). I first read "Leaf Storm" a few decades ago, and decided it needed a re-read. Like William Faulkner, who found a seemingly inexhaustible source of material in that small postage-stamp size of earth that is Lafayette Co., Mississippi, which he fictionalized as Yoknapatapa Co., so too Marquez produced story after story based on his own town of Aracataca, Columbia, which he would fictionalize as Macondo. Both Faulkner and Marquez would win the Nobel Prize, separated by a bit more than four decades.

"Leaf Storm" was published twelve years before "One Hundred Years..." It is a novella which sets the stage for his later work. All the familiar elements are there: the town itself, of Macondo. Always in the background is the Civil War, which tore Columbia apart, dating from the 19th Century. The Civil War provides so much of the impetus for current actions. And there is the "magical realism" that is the hallmark of Marquez' style... those seemingly impossible events that just happen.

Marquez draws the reader in with the death of a doctor that the town hated. The search for the "why" carries the reader through the first half of the novella. As Marquez describes the town's feelings, in a style reminiscent of Faulkner : "...
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Format: Paperback
What can I say?

There is a reason that Gabriel Garcia Marquez is a master. He didn't just have a unique and powerful way of writing, he also had a unique and powerful way of seeing the world around him. I am also reading Gabriel Garcia Marquez, A Life by Gerald Martin. It has been a fascinating journey, reading Leaf Story as I read about the early years of his life in Colombia and traveling in Europe, what used to be the U.S.S.R., the United States, and Cuba.

It was easy to give this book 5 stars. A Very Old Man With Enormous Wings may still be my favorite story, but the entire book got under my skin.

The brilliance is this: The leaf storm is the arrival of--for lack of a better term--industry to the small town of Macondo. The leaf trash are the elements of the population that the storm blows into town, leaving the residents already there feeling like outsiders.

This is presented in the prologue. What follows is so unique. It is not factual, it is like watercolor bleeding on a wet canvas. The stories sprawl into the psyches of the imagined citizens. We get their hearts and souls.

I've written about each of the stories on my blog [...] on the entries between October 18, 2012 and November, 19, 2012.

It is really unfortunate that this treasure has not become available for ereaders.
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