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Learn Chess: A Complete Course Paperback – October 1, 1994


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Paperback, October 1, 1994
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Learn Chess: A Complete Course + Learn Chess + Chess for Children:  How to Play the World's Most Popular Board Game
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Product Details

  • Series: Cadagon Chess
  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: Everyman Chess; 3rd edition (October 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 185744115X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857441154
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #897,998 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Learn Chess: A Complete Course provides everything you need to know to get started in chess. The first part is devoted to first principles, explaining the rules and basic strategies, whilst the second develops a thorough understanding of the various winning methods, and includes a systematic study of openings, an introduction to attacking techniques, and a guide to fundamental endgame themes.

Customer Reviews

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See all 13 customer reviews
This book does a great job of that.
Shayana Kadidal
If possible, work the exercises without using a set and board in order to develop the ability to look ahead.
T. George
Having said that, I would highly recommend this book for a beginner.
John Salerno

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

341 of 342 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on September 15, 2006
"Learn Chess" is a great place to start if you are either someone who doesn't know the difference between a Horse and a Knight or what the "en passant rule" is. It is also good if you know a little about chess but what formal instruction. This is not a small kiddie book! It is written as if it was like a book to be used in a high school chess class (about the right level).

"Learn Chess" is very clear and goes way beyond the starting rules by covering strategy that will take you to an intermedate player! You get a lot of material that is well organized. If you are looking for a book for an elementary school kid you might consider a lower reading level and more simple presentatiion with "chess, a complete guide for the beginner" that is written for the young reader. Once you finish "Learn Chess" you will be ready for books on tactics, traps, openings, endgames and complete game collections!
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69 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Shayana Kadidal on September 24, 2003
A classic: the best A-to-Z course in chess I've ever seen; ideal for teaching smart kids to play. It's very, very efficient, which means that it can cover everything from the basics to more complicated material in just 170 pages. The elegance of the presentation makes its points easy to hold in your head when you're playing.
The real glory of this book is the middle sections: the chapters on double attack, forks, pins and skewers, and the like are great. It's easy to explain the basics of chess and some of the advanced student subjects like openings; but the middle game subjects can be hard to explain logically (rather than through endless examples). This book does a great job of that.
The same text used to come in two very attractively bound slim volumes.
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48 of 48 people found the following review helpful By T. George on February 28, 2003
This is a very good book on the basics of chess. I would recommend it for anyone who wants to learn to play chess, or who already knows but would like to improve.
This book was originally published in 2 volumes. Now they have been combined into one. Volume explains the rules, and the most basic info about the opening, ending, and how one wins a chess game.
Volume 2 covers the most useful ways to win material (pins, skewers, forks). There follows a chapter on mating attacks. Then there is more info about openings and endings. The last couple of chapters give some general advice and points the reader to other sources of chess information.
Each chapter has exercises. Some of them are simple, others challenging. Don't be discouraged if you can't work them all. My advice is to do every exercise. Write down your answers before looking at the solution. If possible, work the exercises without using a set and board in order to develop the ability to look ahead. I enjoyed working the exercises. They illustrate the lessons, and some of them challenge you to think a little deeper.
The Alburt and Pelts books are also very good. Learn Chess could be used before, after, or along with the A&P books to get a couple of views of the same information.
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35 of 36 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 1, 2007
When I was in Elementary School studying chess from grades 3-6) I learned from "Chess For Juniors" as my text book (probably the best and most easy book to learn from for a 9 to 13 year old). However, for a higher reading level I found this book to be an equal if not a better book for an 8th or 9th grader (not to put "Chess for Juniors" down (it is certainly better for your average elementeary, and early middle school reader and has everything needed for the non-high school player), but "Learn Chess" is like what I like, A college text book, like my older brothers in college use. Simple suggesting, NO BETTER BOOK FOR AGE 16+ reading level is this one, LEARN CHESS, under that "Chess for Juniors". Get Started in Chess these books are the best!!!!
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By John Salerno on August 10, 2008
Verified Purchase
Many years ago when I was a child I bought some random book on how to play chess and I learned two things from it: 1) how the pieces move, and 2) that it's often good to open with e4. I was too young at the time to really want to study it, but ever since then I've always felt the desire to learn how to really play and not just move the pieces around the board.

Finally, I decided to put some effort into it and I chose Learn Chess: A Complete Course as my "first" book to learn from. (That old book is somewhere in my bedroom at home, but I consider this book my first real attempt to learn strategy and tactics.) So I'm evaluating this book from a beginner's point of view -- someone who basically knew how the pieces moved and that's all.

Having said that, I would highly recommend this book for a beginner. It begins with how the pieces move, of course, and how to read and write chess notation, but these chapters are short and to the point and very quickly you'll be learning how to play.

The book is divided into two volumes (which were originally two separate books): the first volume explains the basics, such as what your goals should be during the opening, how to attack, and how to win at the endgame. I think the most enlightening part of this volume for me was the explanation of the value of the pieces. This was something I had always wondered about and this book tells you (even in mathematical terms) what the value of each piece is relative to the pawn (and to one another); the second volume delves much deeper into strategy and tactics. You'll learn about forks, pins, skewers, and more. You'll also learn some opening lines and variations, and how to play some endgame scenarios.
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