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Learn Vb Examples Econtent Multimedia CD – Import, March 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • CD-ROM
  • Publisher: Muska & Lipman Publishing,U.S. (March 1, 2001)
  • ISBN-10: 1929685327
  • ISBN-13: 978-1929685325
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (42 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

You need this in your library!
Willtry@Prodigy.Net
The key to this book, and what makes it so entertaining, is the conversational method that he uses to reinforces the concepts he is teaching.
Ronald D London
Just wanted to take a moment to say I have all of Mr. Smiley's books.
Gary Campbell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By K. Palmer on October 12, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I read John Smiley's Intro to Visual Basic book and found it very informative and a fast read (rare for a programming book). So I picked up his Examples book to get an even better understanding of Visual Basic concepts.
Of the 100 examples listed, I would say about 20% of them cover concepts that Smiley goes over fairly thoroughly in his Intro book, 10% are incredibly stupid concepts (i.e. why does an underscore in a variable name disappear when it is in the general declarations portion of the code - the separator bar covers it up), 10% are questions cleverly designed to promote either Smiley's other books or books written by his friends and 60% provide very good Visual Basic tips that could come in handy to programmers from time to time.
It is these 60% (or 80% if you haven't read the Intro book, but are familiar with the basics of VB) that makes the book worthwhile. I actually was working on an assignment for a VB class I'm taking and got hung up on a concept in a program I was assigned to write. It so happened, I was reading this book at the time and I happened to come across an Example that solved my problem. So there is a lot of good stuff here.
A lot of people who post negative reviews of Smiley's books criticize the storytelling way Smiley uses to communicate the material he presents. Sure, the international TV show concept used in this Examples book is pretty hokey, but it is a more relaxing way to learn the material and I think helps the reader grasp the concept better than almost any other programming book. With other books, the author tries to cram so much information into the book that a reader (especially a beginner) can get overwhelmed and just give up. Smiley's approach doesn't do that.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Ronald D London on February 11, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was my 4th book on Visual Basic, and I liked it so much that I immediately bought all 4 of John Smiley's books on VB. He takes an interesting but dry subject matter, and makes learning it fun by using a "virtual" TV show to answer common questions and problems. The book is full of examples to help the user understand what is happening within VB, and the reader ends it with a better understanding of the elements of programing. The key to this book, and what makes it so entertaining, is the conversational method that he uses to reinforces the concepts he is teaching. This conversational method makes the reader feel that they have sat in on a question and answer session, and have 'understood' the material. A very good second book on VB, as it will reinforce the main concepts, and make them a resource that you will understand.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Gary Campbell on July 13, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Just wanted to take a moment to say I have all of Mr. Smiley's books. I have yet to say thanks to Mr. Smiley. These books are written in a manner that relaxes on while reading. He has a program (the China shop) that you follow along with throughout his series. This book (Examples) is the exception to that series. Mr. Smiley does a dialog as if he is on a TV show where he will answer caller's questions. I am working on several programs for my college and I can not tell you how many time I have used this book as a reference. It answers many common sense questions. If you are a beginner, get this book. Thanks, for your effort John.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Michael Scherbik (mjs1@ruralife.net) on June 7, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you're not familiar with John Smiley's style of teaching than you're in for a treat! He uses a call-in cable TV show as a setting for 100 of the most common Visual Basic questions asked by beginner and intermediate users alike. This book is unlike any other that I've read on the subject. While many authors will try to cram as much info as possible into their book, Professor Smiley has a much more laid back approach. He explains the answers in easy-to-understand language without "talking down" to you or filling your head with a lot of jargon. The best that I can say about this book is that I've learned more from "VB 6 Examples" than I have with any other VB book that I've ever read. Highly Recommended!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. Palmer on October 12, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I read John Smiley's Intro to Visual Basic book and found it very informative and a fast read (rare for a programming book). So I picked up his Examples book to get an even better understanding of Visual Basic concepts.
Of the 100 examples listed, I would say about 20% of them cover concepts that Smiley goes over fairly thoroughly in his Intro book, 10% are incredibly stupid concepts (i.e. why does an underscore in a variable name disappear when it is in the general declarations portion of the code - the separator bar covers it up), 10% are questions cleverly designed to promote either Smiley's other books or books written by his friends and 60% provide very good Visual Basic tips that could come in handy to programmers from time to time.
It is these 60% (or 80% if you haven't read the Intro book, but are familiar with the basics of VB) that makes the book worthwhile. I actually was working on an assignment for a VB class I'm taking and got hung up on a concept in a program I was assigned to write. It so happened, I was reading this book at the time and I happened to come across an Example that solved my problem. So there is a lot of good stuff here.
A lot of people who post negative reviews of Smiley's books criticize the storytelling way Smiley uses to communicate the material he presents. Sure, the international TV show concept used in this Examples book is pretty hokey, but it is a more relaxing way to learn the material and I think helps the reader grasp the concept better than almost any other programming book. With other books, the author tries to cram so much information into the book that a reader (especially a beginner) can get overwhelmed and just give up. Smiley's approach doesn't do that.
Read more ›
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More About the Author

I live just outside of Philadelphia, Pa. I am the president of my own Computer consulting firm, Smiley and Associates, and I provide computer services to companies both large and small in the surrounding Philadelphia Metropolitan area.'Currently, I am working on a long term contract programming position doing mostly Visual Basic work, but also some JavaScript and Oracle Database work.

Over the years, my consulting contracts have included contract positions as a Systems Analyst, Mainframe IDMS Database Administrator, Oracle Database Administrator, Network LAN Administrator, UNIX Systems Administrator, and programming positions using these languages: COBOL, C, C++, Java, and Visual Basic (my personal favorite).'

In addition to my work in the computer industry, I love to share my knowledge, and so for the last twenty years I have taught Computer Science at several Philadelphia area colleges and universities---I truly love to teach.

In 1998, I wrote an introductory Visual Basic programming book, and since then, have written others on Visual Basic, VB.Net, C#, Java and C++, and I'm currently working on a book on JavaScript. Writing books is just another way I have found to share my knowledge. In connection with my books, I have also appeared twice on TechTV's Cable show ScreenSavers. Also, my Java book was used as a plot vehicle in one of the episodes of HBO's Sopranos fourth season--which was very exciting!

I enjoy sports of all kind, and have participated in the MS150, which is a two day, 150 mile bike ride from Philadelphia to Ocean City, NJ, whose proceeds will, hopefully, cure Multiple Sclerosis. Two years ago, I started running again, and have recently completed several 5K, 8K and 5 mile races.'