Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (6)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shifting the Focus
These days the trend in education has been to shift the focus of classes from the teachers to the students. The idea is that by taking responsibility for their own education and by learning by doing and working with others, students will be able to learn skills that will stay with them for the rest of their lives. On the other hand, teacher-centered lectures will only...
Published on August 7, 2006 by T. Hooper

versus
7 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars warmed-over Rousseau
One of the worst books about teaching I've ever seen, if not one of the worst books full stop.

The ultimate goal, I believe, is socialism, or, failing that, social subversion until that is achieved. The book implies the teacher doesn't know anything and has nothing interesting, useful, or informative to say. No, instead all wisdom resides in our little Menos...
Published on June 2, 2012 by Caraculiambro


Most Helpful First | Newest First

46 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shifting the Focus, August 7, 2006
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice (Hardcover)
These days the trend in education has been to shift the focus of classes from the teachers to the students. The idea is that by taking responsibility for their own education and by learning by doing and working with others, students will be able to learn skills that will stay with them for the rest of their lives. On the other hand, teacher-centered lectures will only cause the students to cram for exams and quickly forget what they learned as soon as the exams are finished. This book offers an easy to read guideline for shifting your class to a learner-centered environment. The author has done a good job in writing a practical text. It's not weighed down with too many discussions of research and theory. Instead, the author presents her ideas through her own experiences and the experiences of other teachers. This makes it very easy to follow her recommendations as they have been tested and tried in a classroom setting rather than in an academic journal.

If you're looking for a scholarly work, this may not be what you're looking for, but if you want an easy-to-read practical guide to implementing learner-centered teaching practices, then this is perfect. One more thing, this book was written by and primarly for those who are teaching in university. With some adjustments, you may be able to use the recommendations in this book in a high school setting as well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


39 of 40 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very useful and well-researched approach, August 8, 2003
This review is from: Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice (Hardcover)
Expertly written by Maryellen Weimer (Associate Professor of Teaching and Learning, Berks-Lehigh Valley College, Pennsylvania State University), Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes To Practice is an invaluable resource for college and university educators concerning the learner-centered teaching approach that takes into account what, how, where, and what conditions under which students are learning. Individual chapters convincingly address implementation and fine-tuning adjustments to adopting the learner-centered teaching style, and the appendices include a syllabus, sample learning log, and more. A very useful and well-researched approach, Learner-Centered Teaching is an important and strongly recommended addition to Educational Reference collections and Classroom Instruction reading lists.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Overview, August 3, 2004
This review is from: Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice (Hardcover)
This book not only makes the very strong case for a shift from teacher-centered to learner-centered instruction, it provides a road map for how to achieve that shift in both the classroom and the entire academic institution. It is an excellent book for both faculty and administrators in higher education.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Changed Lives, July 21, 2012
By 
Zee "drlit" (Rutland Town, VT, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I have been using Dr. Weimer's approach in my college courses for the past two years. My students are completely invigorated. Time and time again they say (and I have this in writing, too) that for the first time they feel empowered and in charge of their education. I'm constantly "wowed" by their responses and improved work ethic. My students have earned more "A" grades than previous semesters. I thought "maybe my point cut-offs are too low?" For Spring 2012, I raised the point levels and the students responded by working even harder and still earning A"s. For example, in my Western Lit course, to achieve an A, a student would have to choose to write over 22 pages (that's typed) of essays on topics related to the reading. They would have taken at minimum 5 tests and a midterm, read at least 5 books and participated in class discussions, activities and reviews. I vary my teaching methods between lecture/presentation, group work, and individual work.

Some reviewer here really missed the point of students working on class participation policy -- that's the best idea ever. We spend two class periods at the beginning of the semester in discussion about participation. About 95% of the students agree that professors always say (on syllabus or in class) that "participation counts" or "participation will be x% of your grade," but they never explain exactly what participation is or how they're going to grade it. My students create standards, which you'd be surprised are not wishy washy or loose. When asked to chime in, they are serious about their education and want a classroom that supports their learning. Every single class, on their own (without me saying a word) has outlawed cell phones and texting. Doesn't mean they don't slip up, but they have clear ideas about standards. If teachers would allow even the conversation about participation, they might get more buy-in from their students. Participation becomes a factor in their grades, worth 100 points: 50 earned by writing 5 pages or more assessing their own participation and up to 50 points that I use to grade their participation -- using the class policy. Students can opt into the Participation points or not. Rarely does a student opt out. That means everyone in my class is actively trying to participate all the time. And I don't have to prod them and they know the rules and what they need to do to earn the points.

Look, here is the bottom line, everything in life is optional. Really. Either you show up, or you don't. Before I changed to this approach, I would always have some students who would treat assignments as if optional, not do work, not come to class, think they could do make up work at the end and it would be fine. But now, actually telling them "everything is optional" -- lets the cat out of the bag. In my class, with the exception of two assignments, everything is optional. Can a student pass if he or she only does the required two assignments. Heck, no. The deck is certainly stacked. But here's the thing, a student who hates literature and doesn't really want to read all the books and doesn't want an A, can certainly find a way to learn enough to earn a "C" -- and isn't that okay? Heck, yes.

I give each student a complete list of assignments and due dates and point values for each assignment on a sheet where he or she can record points. I keep a copy of the same sheet. Students always know how they stand in the class. This has made me a better teacher because I return work within at least two class meetings. In fact, many students said last year that I was the best ever at getting work back. Well, I have to thank Dr. Weimer, even though she didn't really mention that in the book. But in order for the approach to work, professors need to step up and be involved, too. The two "rules" are great . Once the due date is passed, the work cannot be accepted. I always had a "no late work" policy, but now I don't hear whining and begging. The other rule is that in order to earn any points for an assignment or test, students must earn at least 50% of the points available. I ask the students, "why?" And they immediately tell me, "so you don't get junk." Bravo. See? They know. They feel like they are being treated as adults, sometimes for the first time in school.

At the end of the semester, I ask students to assess this method of setting up the course. The letters can be anonymous or not. Doesn't matter. Overwhelmingly, the students love this approach. The line I get the most is, "I wish other professors would try this."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars warmed-over Rousseau, June 2, 2012
By 
Caraculiambro (La Mancha and environs) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice (Hardcover)
One of the worst books about teaching I've ever seen, if not one of the worst books full stop.

The ultimate goal, I believe, is socialism, or, failing that, social subversion until that is achieved. The book implies the teacher doesn't know anything and has nothing interesting, useful, or informative to say. No, instead all wisdom resides in our little Menos and it's the teacher's job to fade into the background and let the little darlings produce their own truth.

When I take a class, I hate cooperative formats. I don't like the feeling of having to take up the slack for my group. I am there to hear the teacher's wisdom, insights, and stories, and not the moronic gropings or comedic stylings of my fellow students. The teacher is the expert: he studied for years, he knows the field, knows the issues, knows the questions, knows the approaches.

My ideal course is 100% teacher centered, with occasional insights and questions contributed by students either dealt with quickly or shot down as being unworthy of consideration.

As you can tell by these comments, I didn't much care for this book.

Notice, too, that there's a central irony to the author's approach. She tells you to elicit all these things from your students, to facilitate instead of teach, etc., etc. Yet when SHE feels she has some truth to communicate, well shut up. The book is 100% her theories. There's no effort to put her money where her mouth is and collate the opinions of experienced teacher, look at data-based studies, etc. No, no, everybody shut up and listen to what I have to say.

What about subject-centered learning? Why do we never hear that phrase?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Support for Educators, November 23, 2008
By 
Janet Colletti "jsc" (New Orleans, LA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice (Hardcover)
Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice came highly recommended. When Ms. Weimer came to my college to speak I jumped at the opportunity to attend. The seminar was great fun and very informative! This book is great support for the educator who desires to improve the level of learning and responsibility in the classroom in such a way that the students are more empowered. A must read for todays college educator!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent book, April 6, 2009
This review is from: Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice (Hardcover)
It is a good guide book for college teachers who want to motivate their students.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice
Learner-Centered Teaching: Five Key Changes to Practice by Maryellen Weimer (Hardcover - July 8, 2002)
Used & New from: $0.44
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.