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Learning Node Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-1449323073 ISBN-10: 1449323073 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 396 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (October 10, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449323073
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449323073
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 7 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #448,055 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

Moving to the Server-Side

About the Author

Shelley Powers has been working with, and writing about, web technologies--from the first release of JavaScript to the latest graphics and design tools--for more than 12 years. Her recent O'Reilly books have covered the semantic web, Ajax, JavaScript, and web graphics. She's an avid amateur photographer and web development aficionado, who enjoys applying her latest experiments on her many web sites.


More About the Author

Plain. Writer.

Shelley Powers has been working with, and writing about, web technologies--from the first release of JavaScript to the latest graphics and design tools--for more than 15 years. Her recent O'Reilly books have covered JavaScript, Node, and HTML5.

Shelley is now transitioning to other topic areas, including sustainable agriculture, food safety, environmentalism, animal welfare, and combating corporate front groups. Upcoming books will touch on the 100 year old battle over raw milk, and the ten year court case between Feld Entertainment (Ringling Brothers Circus) and the animal welfare community.

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Moreover, I found this book very slow-paced, and poorly organized.
Franck PORCHER
That said, I think O'Reilly would have done well to wait a little longer or put more time and effort into putting out something a bit more comprehensive.
Marie S.
In my experience, it is always better to start with the fundamentals, even if it isn't nearly as exciting for some of the readers.
Magnitus

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Devendra on November 6, 2012
Format: Paperback
Learning Node by Shelley Powers is timely, and should be on the reading list of every JavaScript and server-side developer. I have used Node on Linux for x86 and ARM, and Windows. Its performance, especially for network-intensive applications, has me astounded.

I'll briefly delve into things that stood out to me in each chapter of the book.

Chapter 1 is must read if you don't understand the asynchronous nature of Node. It also covers building it from source for Linux, and using WebMatrix to develop and run Node applications with IIS.

Chapter 2 shows how to use command line REPL (read-eval-print loop) to quickly test code, inspect objects, and as an editor. Imagine that!

Chapter 3 covers the Node core objects and modules. In particular, the global namespace object, process.nextTick to asynchronously execute a callback, util.inherits to implement inheritance, and EventEmitter to emit events.

Chapter 4 covers the Node module system. Covers require and how it searches for modules (.js, .node or .json), delete require.cache to reload a module from source, how to create your own custom module, and expose its objects and functions using export. It also covers often used modules such as npm (installed with Node) for package management, Optimist for options parsing, and Underscore.

Chapter 5 delves deeper into the asynchronous nature of Node, covering control flow, exception handling, and asynchronous patterns. It then discusses the Step and Async modules that implement those patterns. It also briefly discusses Node coding style.

Chapters 6, 7, and 8 discuss web development middleware and frameworks such as Connect and Express, and templating modules that work in tandem with Express, such as EJS and Jade.
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Format: Paperback
I was pretty excited to jump into Node. After doing loads of research on Node and reading just about everything I could get my hands on, I had the opportunity to read Shelley Powers' book. I figured it would give me a pretty good foundation, and perhaps fill in some of the blanks in my understanding. Unfortunately, it didn't really do either.

Now, the framework is relatively new. When I started fiddling, it was still in development. Naturally, it's not easy to write a comprehensive book on such a new framework. That said, I think O'Reilly would have done well to wait a little longer or put more time and effort into putting out something a bit more comprehensive. They got this out to meet the immediate demand, but it really doesn't cut it.

There are quite a few alternatives now, so I'd suggest looking elsewhere.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Huawei Chen on November 29, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is really good guide, though I am still expecting Mike Chanton's <<Node in Action>>, but this book, for now, is good enough.

It covers express, and other modules, and advanced use of node.js

the chapters are really in good step and step deeper. All code are well explained.

I recommond this book, for now. but till 2013 Feb, node in action releases, I will buy that one also.
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By James Luker on February 24, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I expect a baseline level of quality from any O'Reilly title, and this one disappoints. It's funny because before I got this book, the worst O'Reilly title I'd owned/read was Shelley Powers's Practical RDF. Well, fooled me twice, I guess. This book is just plain bad. I'm into chapter 5 and I just don't find it very illuminating or instructive. There's also been a few sloppy code examples that either don't do what the text suggests they should, or just plain throw errors. Wishing I'd waited for Manning's Node.js in Action.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Vizhanyo Mihaly on April 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read a couple of programming books don't really explain concepts but show "click here, then click there" kind of of recipes to solve specific problems.
Learning node is not that bad, at least not all the time. Some of the concepts and source code are actually well explained, but some part of them are not.
Having some explanation on some of the more recent features in javascript would be also helpful.
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