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Leaving Egypt: Finding God in the Wilderness Places Paperback – November 15, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 246 pages
  • Publisher: Square Inch (November 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592556736
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592556731
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (92 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #382,732 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Leaving Egypt is a welcome roadmap for anyone who is tired of taking two steps forward, three steps back whether you are lost in addiction, doubt, fear, shame, or religiosity. This book is a guide filled with directions not to a destination, but to stay on the path, because this journey is the Promised Land." --Sharon Hersh, M.A., LPC, speaker, adjunct professor in several graduate schools including Reformed Theological Seminary, author of "The Last Addiction" and "Begin Again, Believe Again"

"It's a long and sometimes painful journey out of "Egypt," the place of fear, enslavement, and distrust. I know--I've been there, and still visit on occasion. If you're trapped in "Egypt" and know there should be something far better, this book will change your life. With profound biblical and theological insight, Chuck DeGroat has written a "travel guide" for human and flawed travelers who want to be free." --Steve Brown, professor at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, author, and teacher on the nationally syndicated radio program Key Life

"It's a long and sometimes painful journey out of "Egypt," the place of fear, enslavement, and distrust. I know--I've been there, and still visit on occasion. If you're trapped in "Egypt" and know there should be something far better, this book will change your life. With profound biblical and theological insight, Chuck DeGroat has written a "travel guide" for human and flawed travelers who want to be free." --Steve Brown, professor at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, author, and teacher on the nationally syndicated radio program Key Life

About the Author

Chuck DeGroat is Director of the Counseling Center of City Church in San Francisco, a Reformed Church in America congregation, and Academic Dean of Newbigin House of Studies, a visionary new cooperative seminary project with Western Theological Seminary of Holland, Michigan.

More About the Author

Chuck DeGroat is Associate Professor of Pastoral Care and Counseling at Western Theological Seminary, MI, and Senior Fellow at Newbigin House of Studies, San Francisco, which he co-founded with Scot Sherman. He has served as Teaching Pastor at City Church San Francisco, as well as adjunct professor and director of spiritual formation at Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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See all 92 customer reviews
My stylistic props aside, I really liked reading this book and thinking about the thoughts presented.
Ashley Mott
He shows us how we cling to the past, because it's known, and how we have trouble trusting that God has a better plan and wants freedom for us.
Pamela Barrett
Many times it takes stopping what looks to the world a good thing like being a servant to God at church.
kindred spirit

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By LMS on February 29, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Even though I'd never heard of this author before, the title and description of this book got my attention. I have logged a lot of time in a wilderness. There have many times over the course of my life where I've wondered "God where are you in the midst of this? Do you see? Do you even care?" But I also know something else. It's true that it's during the painful, difficult times in our lives that we grow the most. I know this to be true because I have experienced it time and time again. My times of greatest spiritual growth coinside with my times of greatest pain and doubt.

This book builds on the premise that we are all slaves to something. We don't have a choice in the matter. We are all living in some form of slavery. We are all in bondage to something. Contrary to what some Christian authors/pastors seem to believe, becoming a Christian doesn't mean all our bondage, pain, and hang-ups instantly disappear once a person become a Christian. Instead, becoming a Christian is just the first step on the journey towards freedom. The author points out that we in the West are woefully unprepared to deal with suffering. When suffering strikes, we authomatically think that we are being punished by God or that we have done something wrong. In some cases, our suffering may be the result of our own lack of judgement and poor choices. I'm not denying that. But the Bible makes it crystal clear. If a person chooses to live a godly life, they will be persecuted. It's not a matter of if it will occur, but what form it will take. That means, that it is possible that suffering can come from doing everything right! The author also makes the point that the church, by and large, doesn't know how to minister to people who are suffering.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Citizen John TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 24, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Here and there one sees references to Moses, the Book of Exodus and a wilderness generation. Many authors draw on ancient teachings, not only because they are timeless, but also to use familiar stories. In this book, Chuck DeGroat makes some excellent observations that have profound implications for the way we can experience life.

Exodus is, among other things, about ancient Israelites leaving slavery in Egypt for a difficult and long journey in the wilderness to a promised land where their next generation could prosper. DeGroat explains by way of analogy how our own version of Egypt today is difficult to go out from and how tempting it is to want to return to it. In other words, we exist in a different type of slavery even now and our natural impulse is to learn to cope with it rather than leave it.

DeGroat has an interesting idea. He shows how the usual remedies for dealing with problems fall short when it comes to breaking out of slavery (a loaded term to describe attachments, per the author). For example, in seeking advice for many types of major problems, we are often told intricate ways to substitute our negative thinking for positive thinking. We're likely to learn to cope with our lot and try harder, rather than to do the thing that DeGroat says is all but missing from our culture.

What's missing, according to Leaving Egypt, is lament. We're not really allowed much in the way of expressions of grief and shared mourning. To the contrary, we're led to expressions of optimism and even triumph. Ancient Israelis apparently allowed free reign to expressions of lament. That's healthy because life is filled with pain and suffering, not just joy.

The author tells us there's a time to lament and not to try taking a shortcut to feeling better despite opposing messages received every day.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Shana VINE VOICE on June 1, 2012
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
In this book the author uses the Exodus story and compares it with the problems we face today in our daily lives. As a Christian, I found this book interesting and helpful.

The author shares personal stories as well as, real-life experiences from some of the clients he has worked with before. The personal stories were helpful to me. They took the Exodus story that most people are familiar with and entwined it with today's problems that most anyone has or will have during their life. The book is broken into four main sections; Egypt (oppression/bondage), Sinai (self-discovery/new identity), Wilderness (purgation/transformation), and Home (deliverance/mission/promise). This story also deals with almost every part of growing in the life of a believer of Christ. In this book you will learn more about trepidation and faith, trust and humbleness and healing and freedom.

This was a book that made me relate to the Exodus in a way I had never before. It took the Exodus story and made it into something that anyone could relate to. I think the author was very successful in bring todays challenges and melding them together with the past and somehow making them seem one.

Overall, I`d recommend it for growing and mature Christians. I probably wouldn't recommend it to new Christians as, there are some parts which get a bit theological and could be confusing. If you like Christian books, than I think that this is definitely one you should read. It would also be good for a group Bible study and discussion.
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