Qty:1
  • List Price: $21.95
  • Save: $5.86 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Lebanon: A House Divided has been added to your Cart
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by ezekial3
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Used copy in Very Good Condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Lebanon: A House Divided Paperback – January 23, 2013


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.09
$8.75 $1.12

Featured Selections in History
Browse books spanning centuries and topics, from the American Revolution to World War II to modern-day affairs. Learn more
$16.09 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Lebanon: A House Divided + The Iranians: Persia, Islam and the Soul of a Nation
Price for both: $32.68

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Conflicting factions and the beliefs they represent--Christian against Muslim, Lebanese against Palestinian, for example--are defined and analyzed. "With impressive no-nonsense clarity Mackey sorts out the tangled history of Lebanon," said PW. "The author is bluntly critical of the Lebanese for their unwillingness to accept responsibility for the fate of their country."
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

This is an excellent primer on Lebanon and its internal politics for both the general reader and the specialist. In an almost clinical fashion, journalist Mackey strips away the complex nuances of Lebanese politics and looks at each social and ethnic component individually. She covers the historical background and development of Lebanon from antiquity to current day. She analyzes the agony of the contemporary civil war and provides insight into the intertwining of families and power politics. Also discussed is the role of the external regional and world powers, particularly the strong French influence, the American and Israeli interventions, and the Soviet presence. This is an excellent supplement to Michael Hudson's The Precarious Republic (Random, 1968) and Lebanon in Crisis , edited by P. Edward Haley and Lewis W. Snider (Syracuse Univ. Pr., 1979). Well recommended for a wide audience. See also Thomas L. Friedman's From Beirut to Jerusalem , reviewed on p. 95.
- Ed. -- Sanford R. Silverburg, Catawba Coll., Salisbury, N.C.
Copyright 1989 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (July 17, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393328430
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393328431
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #600,101 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Antero Vipunen on August 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
Mackey's book is an interesting read, she uses a different style than most other authors in the genre. She spends some time discribing how mountains look when pulling into port and the like. It gives the book a different tempo, which could be good or bad depending upon your personal tastes.

For the good aspects of the book, I suggest reading the Editorial Reviews on this page. They'll do a better job than I explaining the good.

There are several things I don't like. This is a re-print, and as such it advertises a "new introduction". It really isn't an introduction, as it only explains why she decided to re-print the book and that she is going to be releasing a second volume on the subject.

The second problem is, in my opinion, rather large. She only includes a four page selected bibliography. I give her the benifit of the doubt that she isn't making up the contents of the book, but I still want to know where she got her sources. If I want to further my reading on the subject, or if I need to come up with additional sources for a paper on Lebanon, or if I decide that I want to check her sources the bibliography offered makes that largely impossible.

The 15 pages of notes don't help either. The authors quoted there appear in the selected bibliography. The rest of the notes read somewhat like a glossary. For example, on page 268 you can read her definition of Imam: "Regarding the Twelve Imams of Shiism, an imam is a divinely inspired successor to the Prophet. In general terms, an imam can also be simply the spiritual leader of the community, not unlike the village priest in Catholicism." To somebody with a basic knowledge of the Middle East or Islam, the definition isn't needed.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By George Chahine on May 2, 2009
Format: Paperback
The book is extremely well written, which gives it a sort of "feel good" sense about it. In that sense, it's not surprising that it's selling well, or it's getting excellent reviews from beginners who want to understand something about Lebanon. The author does an excellent job of captivating the reader.

Nonetheless, substance-wise, it's severly lacking. For one thing, there are statistics on pre-war Lebanon with no references, no sources, nothing. There are quotes without any mention of who actually wrote/said them, nevermind any references. It certainly does not conform to any shape of scholarly rigour. We are told in the introduction that there's a lot to talk about when it comes to Lebanon and so 'space must be saved.' Yet, in order to support her explanations of "Lebanese psyche", she uses such compelling evidence (note: sarcasm) as verbal disputes between drivers on the streets of Beirut or the answer of a single young boy about a question on arithmetics (of course we are spared any background information on the boy). The Maronite community is criticized for its 'unwarranted/desperate' needs to associate with the Phoenicians, yet the author has no trouble associating the Phoenicians' supposed lack of ethical conduct (again, no references) with current 'Lebanese behavior.' The underlying thesis of the book is that Arab culture, which is shared by all communities (we are told), is the root of Lebanon's problems because of its propensity for violence and conflict, and thus Lebanon is the key to understand all other Arab countries.

For a much better, academically-oriented, account of the divisions that plague Lebanon, I recommend Kamal Salibi's "A House of Many Mansions."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By AG on November 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
This was a great book. I was looking for a relatively short read that would bring me up to speed on Lebanon and all the factions fighting within the country. The author did a wonderful job of showing the interelationship of all the parties and how things started. I would strongly recommend it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kevin M Quigg VINE VOICE on April 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
If you lived through the seventies and eighties, one thing which was constant was the Lebanese Civil War. In this war, endless fractions paired off against each other destroying a country so throughly that it now only coming out of this dark period. There was the war between the Shiites and Sunnis, the war between the Druze and other faiths, the inter Christian clan war.

Throw in the Israelis and Palestinians, and there were plenty of enemies in this war.

The author Mackey examines the country and the various factions and tries to make some sense of how this war came about. Her sub title is indeed her belief that Lebanon was dying. When even the Red Cross pulled out of Lebanon, many in the West simply gave up on this country.

Mackey does a good job of detailing a little bit of the history of the country and why the various factions could not live together. She puts into her perspective that Lebanon was not going to survive the Civil War. It has, first under Syrian tutelage, and now as a completely independent country.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Tom_Brownn on March 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
A masterpiece that descruibes the historical context and the motivations of the different groups that participated in the Lebanese civil war. Essential reading for anyone who wants to understand Lebanon, its 15year civil war, and some of the background behind the conflict in the Middle East.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Lebanon: A House Divided
This item: Lebanon: A House Divided
Price: $16.09
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?