Led Zeppelin (Deluxe Edition)

June 3, 2014 | Format: MP3

$13.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:46
30
2
6:42
30
3
6:28
30
4
6:28
30
5
4:34
30
6
2:12
30
7
2:30
30
8
4:42
30
9
8:27
Disc 2
30
1
3:52
30
2
6:41
30
3
3:49
30
4
15:01
30
5
9:19
30
6
11:55
30
7
9:21
30
8
11:14


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 12, 1969
  • Release Date: January 12, 1969
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Atlantic Records
  • Copyright: 2014 Atlantic Recording Corporation, a Warner Music Group Company. Marketed by Rhino Entertainment Company, a Warner Music Group Company.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:56:01
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00IZ6AYGG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (684 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,114 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

This is one of the best debut albums from any band I've ever heard.
Dan
Songs like Good times, bad times, How many more times, Communication Breakdown, and Black Mountain make this a great album.
Ryan
This is a great album that presaged a lot of the hard rock music of the '70s, and I highly recommend it.
Johnny Heering

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

169 of 186 people found the following review helpful By J. Brittman VINE VOICE on August 17, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This is Led Zeppelin's best CD. No other CD truly defines this band better than their self-titled debut. All songs on this album are indispensible. Dazed and Confused is a masterpiece, as is Babe, I'm Gonna Leave you. But the real heart and soul of this record are its blues tracks You Shook Me and I Can't Quit You Baby anchor the album. Zep was always at their best playing the blues, just check out Since I've Been Lovin' You. Your Time is Gonna Come still gives me goosebumps, and How Many More Times is the hidden gem on the album. Zeppelin would never top the overall consistency of this album, it is a true landmark in rock history and should be in every fans' collection.
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65 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Sal Nudo VINE VOICE on April 15, 2000
Format: Audio CD
The short guitar bursts on "Good Times Bad Times" that open this firecracker debut in 1969 could be viewed as a forewarning of great songs to come, some of the most historic moments in rock and roll. These four guys were actual musicians who, as a collective unit, created a sound that was unmatchable at the time. And they didn't just blast away at their instruments, either. "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You" showcases gentle acoustic guitar at first, then later driving riffs that could inspire anyone to play air guitar. Even on their first record, Zeppelin weren't afraid to draw out their songs (some would say overstay their welcome), and four of the nine tunes last (and blast) for over six minutes. Like The Doors, Zeppelin had a keen interest in the blues; underneath all the raw rock on this album is a soulful, bluesy sound and aura with two Willie Dixon covers that the band "Zeppelinizes" to the max. Nothing, however, tops the segway from "You Shook Me" to the blazing "Dazed and Confused," which sounds amazing, raw and blistering. The organ work of John Paul Jones on "Your Time is Gonna Come" is truly beautiful, sounding like a church hymn on a rough-and-tumble rock and roll album. Undoubtedly, these British lads mixed sonic beauty and thrashing rawness to create an art form that still resonates today. "Black Mountain Side" is a busy acoustic ditty that sounds positively charming next to its follower, "Communication Breakdown," but that's Zeppelin's style in a nutshell -- heartlifting to raw in a matter of seconds. These rocking songs come off as urgent and passionate. Lyrically, the album is all blues as Plant wails majestically about one heartbreak after the other, moaning about his lost women and unabashedly feeling lonesome and sorry for himself. No matter, he'd have plenty of time to attain more women in the future. This is the work of a band ready to take on the world -- on its own terms.
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77 of 87 people found the following review helpful By J. Hill TOP 500 REVIEWER on June 3, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
For our listening pleasure, Jimmy Page has decided to remaster the Led Zeppelin catalog, beginning here in 2014 with the first three albums, all being released today, June 3rd. Page has also dug through his archives and included an extra disc of bonus material for each album. I'm glad he did, because I've been meaning to replace my scratched-up, worn-out CD for awhile now, and a nice new remaster hits the spot. Out of the three, Zeppelin I probably has the widest appeal, and may end up being the most sought-after. For one, it has some of the most popular, well-known, revered songs of Zeppelin's career, including "Good Times, Bad Times," "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You," "Dazed and Confused," and "Communication Breakdown," among others. I don't know any Zep fan who has anything but praise for these classics, and the rest of the album, too, for that matter. These four men, Plant, Page, Jones, and Bonham, had a truly special kind of magic than shines through on this album, which has to be up there as one of the greatest debut albums ever, regardless of genre. I'm entirely pleased with the remaster, and I'm sure it's going to get worn out in short order.

As good as the album is, the real treat of this deluxe edition is the bonus disc. For many years, audio of Zeppelin's 1969 show in Paris has been floating around, and was considered a treasured chronicle of the band in its early days. Now, Page has decided to release it officially, and the sound is fantastic. I've been listening to it up against the sound of the older bootleg, and I think it's far superior. It's way more listenable, cleaning up much of the noise and muddiness from what's been available up to now. The drums are much improved, with a far more clear snare sound and the cymbals way more under control.
Read more ›
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Abner Doubleday on June 4, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I am by no means an audiophile, but I've been listening to this album for over 40 years every way possible (vinyl, cassette, CD...sorry no 8-Track). I listened to the remastered CD with a good set of headphones and it felt like I was hearing the songs for the very first time. I've always thought previous Zeppelin CDs sounded muddy. The bass was buried under Bonham's drumming and the vocals seemed to get lost in the mix.

Not this version! The separation is amazing and Robert Plant's voice seems to float above the music like lightining. And of course Page's virtuoso guitar work shines throughout. My favorite is Your Time Is Gonna Come, hardly one of their big hits. Because the song features keyboards, acoustic and slide guitar you can really appreciate the remaster best on this song.

I've seen a lot of negative comments about the concert disc. It is what it is soundwise. But it is worth it just to hear the tremendous energy they generated on stage and I love how raw it sounds.

So if you are on the fence as to whether to buy the remaster, go for it!
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