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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The New Led Zeppelin Remasters, Round Two
It's 2014, and time for a new round of re-masters of the Led Zeppelin catalog by Jimmy Page. If you don't own this album or have been meaning to replace your old, scratched-up copy, now's the perfect time. I'm replacing an old, scratched-up copy. I don't imagine anyone looking into this is new to Zeppelin, so you probably already know that their second album was an...
Published 6 months ago by J. Hill

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15 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Compression
I also have the Classic Records 200 gram vinyl release of this album (SD8236)and it is phenomenal. I bought it just when I was getting back into vinyl and it is THE album I use to show off my system. I'm using a Pioneer Elite SC-55, Marantz TT-15S1 turntable with Bowers and Wilkins 683 towers and I'm able to hear a huge difference between this new remastered version and...
Published 5 months ago by J. Richbourg


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "A great 'lemon-squeezing' album!", January 27, 2012
This review is from: Led Zeppelin II (Audio CD)
This is one of my favorite albums of all time! In my opinion, this album set the trend for Heavy Metal Rock as we know it today. The band utilized several recording studios in the creation of this album, with Jimmy Page ultimately receiving the credit for the entire production.
It was during this album that Robert Plant began to feel comfortable recording with the band because of the strict demands that were placed on his vocal abilities. He had actually thought about quitting the band prior to this!
The album was released on October 22, 1969 on Atlantic Records. With an advance order of 400,000 copies, it took its place as number one in the U.S., replacing "Abbey Road" by The Beatles' twice, and remained there for seven weeks.
Tracks include:
Side one
1)Whole Lotta Love
2)What Is and What Should Never Be
3)The Lemon Song
4)Thank You

Side two
1)Heartbreaker
2)Living Loving Maid(She's Just a Woman)
3)Ramble On
4)Moby Dick
5)Bring It On Home

To me, this entire album feels as if it is one unending track. It should be classified as an "emotion" because of the ambience it creates when it is listened to. I have researched this album and found that it has gone platinum 12 times over-and that was in 1999!
In January 1970, "Whole Lotta Love" was released as a condensed single against the bands wishes. I can't say that I blame them much-it's like reading only the first and last page of a book. "Living Loving Maid" was released on the "B" side of the 45RPM.
The cover of the album was designed by David Juniper. The band told him to come up with something "interesting".
What he came up with, was duplicating a WWI picture of the Red Baron (Manfred von Richthofen) with the infamous "German Flying Circus". Picturing the outline of a Zeppelin on a brown background, the album was nicknamed `The Brown Bomber".
Jimmy Page is a true genius and a pioneer of rock and roll. With his contribution to music and his unique flair for creativity, he gave us "finger taps" and "neck shredding". His "riff's" have led rock and roll to new heights inspiring musicians, Steve Vai, Eddie Van Halen, Aerosmith, and Guns And Roses.
I never get tired of listening to this album, (and I don't feel like I'm alone here,) I somehow feel that it will never drop off the charts. Obviously, I love the album in its entirety, but if I had to choose a favorite, it would have to be "Ramble On." It's a peaceful song that fills my heart with contentment, and I hear it at least once a week on the local Rock station here in Tennessee.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Led Zeppelin II, December 9, 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Led Zeppelin II (Audio CD)
Zeppelin's "II" is simply put, the most influential hard rock album to ever be stocked on shelves. It fuses blues and straight-up rock to a perfect degree, and includes elements of folk, and even traces of metal in it as well. This album gets off to an exceptional start with "Whole Lotta Love," and its infectious riff (the electrifying guitar solo is also one of Page's best, and is worth waiting around for through the dark and imaginative midsection). "What Is and What Should Never Be" is another classic that goes from light to heavy in an instant. The slide guitar and gong are nice touches. "The Lemon Song" is pure blues mayhem with wild solos, Plant sounding annoying (as usual), and a hot bass line. "Thank You" is a surprisingly good love song that has some great drum outbreaks, all credit to Bonham. Next up are "Heartbreaker" and "Living Loving Maid"(She's just a woman). These two tracks go together perfectly, with both of them being medium-paced, blues-based rock tunes. Heartbreaker contains a superb solo, first unaccompanied, and then played together with two other guitars. "Ramble On" showcases John Paul Jones' bass playing expertise, and has some of the greatest lyrics of all of Led Zep's songs (inspired by Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings"). "Moby Dick" is built upon a fantastic guitar rhythm section, and the monster drum solo by Bonzo is a brutal dose of percussion at its finest. Finally, the album ends with "Bring It On Home" to bring the album to a close, and this song features Plant playing an electric harmonica, and Page's explosive riffs shredding through the otherwise peaceful tune, half way in. All of the songs on "II" differ from one another, which makes one view this album as more of a compilation than a one-themed release, and this variety accounts for it being considered one of the greatest albums of all time. It still sounds fresh today, due mostly to unpredictable rhythm changes and top notch recording quality. If you like rock music, or any of the other genres that branch out of it, you will not be disappointed. I strongly recommend this album.
Peace
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Uncensored rock 'n roll., November 21, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Led Zeppelin II (Audio CD)
LED ZEPPELIN II is more than just a group's second album. It's also much more than a blues record. It's bold and innovative; some people say that art-rock is to SGT. PEPPER, ARE YOU EXPERIENCED is to jazz-like rock, as NEVER MIND THE BOLLOCKS is to punk, but LED ZEPPELIN II is to heavy metal. Metal didn't become a commercial mainstream until the mid-80s, but in 1969, Led Zeppelin was playing the music like the back of their hand. It's also somewhat of a pleasant surprise that few metal bands, imitators or not, could photocopy their sound.
LED ZEPPELIN II happened because of an accident. It was entirely unintentional. Since the band was touring constantly, they couldn't work in the studio very often. So LED ZEPPELIN II has sort of a rushed feel to it, and more than half the songs range from blues jams ("The Lemon Song") to simply traditional blues tunes put into the band's own words ("Whole Lotta Love," "Heartbreaker," and especially "Bring it on Home,"). For most bands, this lack of original material would cripple an album, but it only managed to make LED ZEPPELIN II dirtier, meaner, grimier, more dangerous and (most importantly) better.
The quality of LED ZEPPELIN II is no less than excellent, and apart from the Bonham drum solo "Moby Dick," each song has strong hooks. The album's opener, "Whole Lotta Love," with its distortion-drenched guitar, took blues to new heights, and proved that the blues would never be the same again. Plant's "What is and What Should Never Be," escalates from quiet, giggly verses to bitterly declarative choruses. "The Lemon Song," while only a reworked blues jam, has a memorable opening riff with plenty of raunchy solos and lyrics ("The way you squeezed my lemon, I fall right out of bed/ The juice runs down my leg"). "Heartbreaker" is a perfect vehicle for Jimmy Page's virtuosity with a Hendrix-like guitar solo.
Led Zeppelin was never big on ballads, but "Thank You" certainly is one, and arguably one of the band's best. Although Robert Plant's voice is noticeably not suited for this type of music, its graceful acoustic guitars and John Paul Jones's organ do manage to lighten the album's mood. "Living Loving Maid (She's Just a Woman)," is an extremely fun rocker and its riff manages to strike a chord inside you and get you going. "Ramble On" blends acoustic and electric guitars seamlessly, also blending folk and hard rock in the process. And finally, closing LED ZEPPELIN II is "Bring it on Home," its intro and closing heavily blues influenced, with Plant blowing away on a harmonica.
LED ZEPPELIN II would not have been as great if it had been given more time in the studio, such as LED ZEPPELIN IV and LED ZEPPELIN III. But what really makes this album work so well is its raw rock 'n roll feel, unmatched in the rest of band's catalog.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The First and Best Hard Rock Album?, February 22, 2001
By 
Paul Minot (Waterville, ME United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Led Zeppelin II (Audio CD)
I just recently got this album on CD for the first time, afterowning the original LP as a kid when it first came out. I've beenthrough punk, and alternative, and am waiting for the next rebirth ofquality rock out of its current state of artistic and musicalmediocrity. (Lame Bizkit et al.) And while I'm waiting, I'm goingthrough my usual rediscovery of Led Zeppelin--it happens every fiveyears or so, but usually is limited to IV or Houses of the Holy, bothoutstandingly great albums IMHO. But after 31 years, I'verediscovered this kickass slab. WHOAH! You can try to listen toStairway to Heaven with fresh ears, and it comes up precious and dated(not to mention overexposed), but "Whole Lotta of Love" isSTILL mindblowingly original-- electronica/hardrock/porno/bluesfusion, anyone? The album is so much more energetic than their ratherponderous debut album, filled with adventurous but entirely successfultime changes, wonderful orchestrations and harmonies, yet every trackbut "Thank You" (perhaps the first sappy hard rock ballad, Iguess it was ZEP who "taught us how to love") simply ROCKSLIKE HELL! "Ramble On" sends shivers up my spine,"What Is and What Should Never Be" STILL surprises me withits offbeat fadeout (where did they come up with THAT?), "TheLemon Song" takes a creepy blues jam into some strange newterritory that still hasn't been reexplored as far as I know,"Living Loving Maid" sounds downrightNew-Wave-ahead-of-its-time, and I think "Heartbreaker" justmay be the TOUGHEST song that's ever been done by ANYBODY. And"Bring It On Home" does just that. Take away the 70'scliche drum solo throaway, "Moby Dick," and you've got analbum full of timeless grand slams (I'm including "ThankYou" just for the ladies, to be frank), free enough of sleepyhippy jams and Celtic fairy dust that even the fussiest punk rockerwould have to give it props. Oh, and Page's guitar work andproduction are at their usual high standard, except rawer; Bonham is,well, Bonham, which means the best rock drummer ever; John Paul Jonesplays his best bass ever, and begs the question why ANYBODY EVERthough Jack Bruce was the best; and Robert Plant is simply miraculous,full of bluesy howl with none of the hint of self-parody thatfollowed, maybe the best rock vocal performance ever. In short, amasterpiece, and I urge all of you young musicians who might beinterested to buy this CD, learn from it, and then go forth and saverock and roll from its current pathetic state.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For those who appreciate music, August 2, 2000
This review is from: Led Zeppelin II (Audio CD)
Anyone who does not give this album five stars has serious issues. The fact that some of these songs are overplayed on the radio is not a reason to give this album a low rating. If anything that should say something about the quality of the songs on the album.
This album is brilliant. LZII offers a mix of styles, mostly hard rock with persistent melodies. "Ramble on" is my fav, but they're all really good. "Heartbreaker" and then "Living Loving Maid" is an amazing combo and reminds me of Yes's "All Good People." "Thank You" is incredible. Plant can do anything with that voice of his. "What Is and What Should Never Be" is classic LZ. I'm not the biggest fan of "Whole Lotta Love," because it's a little repetitive, but the messed up part in the middle is great. "Bring It on Home" is really great and bluesy.
This is one of those albums where every track is really good. The only problem with Led Zeppelin is that they did not produce a bad song. I would actually say that this album ranks 4th out of the 9 studio albums they released, but every album has a different sound and feel, so choose for yourself.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The second helping satisfies most, March 7, 2007
This review is from: Led Zeppelin II (Audio CD)
British blues, which began to gather steam in the early '60s with Alexis Korner, John Mayall and others, reached a pinnacle in 1969 upon the release of LED ZEPPELIN II. The group's first album hadn't done much in the U.S., but a summer tour of the States as opening act for Chicago Transit Authority helped to greatly publicize this new offering. "Whole Lotta Love" was a megahit that autumn of '69, and it seems every high school and college-age kid was tuned in to Led Zeppelin from that point on.

LED ZEPPELIN II is one of those rare albums without a single weak track. Blues, heavy metal, hard rock-- there's something here for everybody. The term "classic rock" was invented for sets like this. Give it a listen, but be sure to say "Thank You."

TOTAL RUNNING TIME -- 41:33
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Vibes, Inspiring, Effective, May 29, 2007
This review is from: Led Zeppelin II (Audio CD)
Another CD filled with GENIUS ! OH, and...LUST ! These two are so passionate,.

These songs REALLY COMMUNICATE !!!!!

I painted one room's mural to this CD.

Truly effective music.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Remastered Vs Original Recording, July 25, 2014
By 
Aaron B. "Aaron B." (Redondo Beach, CA United States) - See all my reviews
So, Im way back into vinyl these days, and I have a nice Rega TT. I was playing some of my Zep vinyl the other day and noticed a big gouch on my Zep II record that plays with loud clicks and pops on a couple songs. I decided to replace it with a fresh copy. I started here on amazon and noticed these new first three LZ albums "RE-MASTEREDs". Being a big LZ fan, I almost bought all three right away, and then pulled a smart maneuver and just tried one first. Here is my review of the Remastering, not the music. We already know that this album is amazing. I A/B'd my old original 70's copy against this new Re-Mastered:
I listened to both albums all the way through, and then focused on "whole Lotta Love" (a lot going on in this song):

***The Original is warmer and more natural sounding with a hint of spicy grit. Also it was recorded with good separation of sounds. It's magic the way it is.
***The Re-mastered is a cleaner copy with a more even EQ response and a tad more output. It's not as warm as the original, and a tad more boring. Also felt a little forced. It was like playing through a Vox AC15 guitar amp and then switching to a Fender Deluxe. The Vox is warmer(more mid range) with some grit, and the Fender being cleaner, bigger sounding , with more scooped mid range (less mids).
It will depend on your audio system and your ears to decide what you will like better; the original recording or the new re-mastered copy. Me personally, I'm going to hunt down a clean old used copy.
Still an excellent album either way!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hammer of The Gods, October 2, 2000
This review is from: Led Zeppelin II (Audio CD)
While that line was not to appear until their 3rd release, this CD was the Hammer.
Rolling Stone, predictably, panned LED ZEPPELIN II, saying that the band was finished (they had also trashed their firs release). I guess it shows that most rock critics then, like most rock critics today, are generally full of crap and should not be taken too seriously.
'Whole Lotta Love' (adapted from Muddy Waters song, 'You Need Love') remains one of the most explosive pieces of rock music ever recorded, and the guitar breaks in 'Heartbreaker', 'Bring It On Home', and other tunes here are almost required material for anyone seriously considering joining a real band.
With wimpy acts like 98-degrees and Ricky Martin topping charts today, it's nice to note that the 'Hammers of the Gods' are still around for people whose tastes have moved beyond playing and singing by little boys.
LED ZEPPELIN II: an 'essential'; a piece of music history and a stunning bolt of rock thunder.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars That's the One!, May 11, 2007
By 
K. Dantzler "Straight Shooter" (North Hollywood, California United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Led Zeppelin II (Audio CD)
I had been hearing Train's rendention of "Ramble On" on the Howard Stern Show, and I loved it. So I decided to get the original version from Led Zeppelin. I'm not disappointed. As fabulous as Train's, but more authentic with Robert Plant singing it. The CD also has great hits like "Whole lotta Love", "What is and what should never Be", & "Living Loving Maid (she's just a woman)". Worth the price.
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Led Zeppelin II
Led Zeppelin II by Led Zeppelin (Audio CD - 1994)
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