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75 of 80 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In A Mellow Mood
After the thundering success of their first two albums, Led Zeppelin showed that they had more than just a heavy metal side. Led Zeppelin III has an acoustic based, earthy sound and in most places finds the band in a mellow mood. "Immigrant Song" opens the album with a driving kick that belies what will follow. "Friends" and "Celebration...
Published on April 17, 2001 by P Magnum

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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars We Come From The Land Of The Ice & Snow
Generally considered the band's first 'soft' step, LED ZEPPELIN III is, in fact, a pretty 'hard' LP. "Immigrant Song," "Celebration Day," "Since I've Been Loving You," and "Out On The Tiles" are pretty heavy stuff--not exactly Fairport Convention.
But Page was beginning to give Plant, he of the golden locks and hippy-dippy...
Published on May 21, 2001 by David Bradley


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75 of 80 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In A Mellow Mood, April 17, 2001
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
After the thundering success of their first two albums, Led Zeppelin showed that they had more than just a heavy metal side. Led Zeppelin III has an acoustic based, earthy sound and in most places finds the band in a mellow mood. "Immigrant Song" opens the album with a driving kick that belies what will follow. "Friends" and "Celebration Day" show off Jimmy Page's skills on the acoustic guitar while retaining the power of their electric work. "Since I've Been Loving You" is a mournful blues dirge in which Robert Plant bleeds his heart out all over the song. John Bonham contributes the fine "Out On The Tiles". "Gallow's Pole" starts with a slow beat and then builds and builds and picks up speed like water rising in a dam. The water keeps getting higher and then tension builds in the song before it comes bursting free at the end. "Tangerine" is beautiful song that doesn't get many mentions as a great Zep song, but despite its seeming subtlety, it one of the most intricate of their songs and one of their all-time best. III is among the most critically bashed of their albums, but the acoustic nature of it was a precursor to the Unplugged albums of the 90's and the album deserves alot more credit than it gets.
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43 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Mature Transition, August 12, 2000
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
On this album ,Zeppelin begin to become more electic in their music after two raunchy blues albums to get the ball rolling. They haven't completely left their power behind though. IMMIGRANT SONG is a short but immensley powerful song with plants banshee wail like nothing you've ever heard. CELEBRATION DAY has a brlliant warped slide guitar riff and OUT ON THE TILES is an underrated classic zeppelin tune with its funky swagger. SINCE I'VE BEEN LOVING YOU is a brilliant epic not quite of the same standard as other zeppelin epics but it still remains a concert favourite. But the secret of this album is the folky side of it which is excellent throughout. GALLOWS POLE is a menacing interpretation of a Leadbelly classic, BRON-YUAR-STOMP is an infectious tune, but the standouts ore most definately TANGERINE which is a quite amazing tune showing how much Zeppelin have matured as can be said for THAT'S THE WAY which is equally pristine and one of their best compositions.
What this album does is show you that Led Zeppelin were far more than straight blues rock or heavy metal, their compositions were detailed thoughtful and even sensitive and of all their albums, this shows that side of them best and also gives us a little sneak preview of what was to come next.
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zeppelin's Greatest Statement, July 4, 2001
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
In 1969, Led Zeppelin hit it big with their first two groundbreaking albums, which both remain landmarks in the history of rock music and laid the foundation for all hard rock and heavy metal to follow. But with the release of LED ZEPPELIN III on October 5, 1970, it showed that the band had more than just blues-inflected rock in their musical veins. In my opinion, this is the definitive Led Zeppelin album; it's certainly their most creative, thoughtful, and introspective LP.
The record's opening track is the fast-paced 2-minute rocker "Immigrant Song," which picks up where ZEP II left off. The song is quickly followed by the energetic acoustic number "Friends" which features great use of the tabla drums, and "Celebration Day" has a finger-pickin' guitar riff so infectious that you can actually groove to it. "Since I've Been Loving You" is Zeppelin's true masterpiece, even surpassing the almighty "Stairway to Heaven." A 7-minute blues epic about love lost, the singing and instrumentation are at an all-time high: John Bonham's drumming is as powerful and subtle as ever; John Paul Jones contributes to the dark feel of the song with an excellent back-alley organ riff; Jimmy Page's heartbreaking guitar solo in the middle is magnificent; and Robert Plant quite possibly delivers the best vocal performance of his career.
Bonham delivers some damn fine lyrics on the catchy rocker "Out on the Tiles," in which Jones's bass sounds like a thumping trampoline. "Gallows Pole," a remake of a Leadbelly song, begins with a soft acoustic groove but like many Zeppelin songs, it builds and builds towards a rousing cresendo. "Tangerine" and "That's The Way" are, simply put, two of the best songs in the Zeppelin canon. Great acoustics and heartfelt lyrics contribute to this back-to-back emotional punch. The album closes with the folky "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp" and the bizarre "Hats Off to (Roy) Harper."
With this album, you get a little of everything: a little hard rock ("Immigrant Song," "Out on the Tiles"), a little bluegrass ("Bron-Y-Aur Stomp"), a little blues ("Since I've Been Loving You"), and lots of awesome folk tunes ("Gallows Pole" and so on). III is Led Zeppelin's best album for many reasons, but it doesn't get the respect it deserves. The playing, the singing, the songwriting, the acoustics, the remastering--everything is perfect. Sure, Zeppelin has made many great albums, but III shows their ambition and musical diversity. A masterwork.
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92 of 109 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Most Underrated Zeppelin Album (4 STARS), January 13, 2002
By 
JWK "jwk" (Dallas, TX USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
I would have to say that "Led Zeppelin III" is by far their most under-appreciated album to date. Many fans hardly recognize it for the beautiful music it contains. Sure, it's not as catchy, driving, grabbing as some of the more popular Zepp albums, but really that's the basis of its appeal. "III" is not something you can imagine filled football stadiums moshing to. It's what's in the background as you ask someone to pass the coffee on a Sunday. And critics, as many as their fans did at the same time, sold them out in the early 1970's. Zepp is heralded as a "Blues Metal Band" (sounds like an oxymoron to me) and people expected the same high pitched wisping Robert Plant vocals to accompany Page's blues riffs. But when "III" hit, everyone was disillusioned. Teased with "Immigrant Song" and Part 2 of Friends, "Celebration Day," no one could lower their heart rate in time to appreciate acoustic classics like "Tangerine," "Gallows Pole," and "That's the Way." Perhaps they could swallow the bluesy "Since I've been Loving You" or "Hats Off to Roy Harper" having been introduced to the same sound in their 1969 debut, but on the whole they were disappointed.
Years later "Immigrant Song," "Friends," "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp," and the unreleased "Hey, Hey What Can I Do" rank among Zeppelin's greatest songs. Page seemed to be the one taking all the risks, hanging up the legendary Les Paul to fiddle with alternate acoustic guitar tunnings (Open D 4th fret capo on "That's the Way," Open G tuning on "Bron-Y-Aur"). And after the dust has settled on the bands monster career, "III" is behind only "IV," "Houses of the Holy," and "Physical Graffiti" as Zepp's finest album.
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41 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zeppelin's Best!, June 15, 2001
By 
tin2x "tin2x" (Staten Island, NY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
Sure it's supposed to be an "acoustic" album and "soft" but it actually is a super, well rounded affair. You get rockin' tunes ("Immigrant Song", "Out On The Tiles", "Celebration Day"), funky folk ("Bron Yr Aur Stomp", "Gallows Pole"), some kickin' blues or blues influenced tracks ("Since I've Been Loving You", "Hats Off To (Roy) Harper" which is "Shake 'Em On Down"), and a super ballad in "Tangerine". I & II are great but I think there's an earthiness and subtlety here that are missing from their first two efforts. IV/ZOSO is overrated because of 3 songs, and the later albums are by and large pretty damn good. But I'd say this is the most diverse album, and apart from metal heads' perspectives, their most accessible. I love Spinal Tap but sometimes you don't need to go to 11 to totally rock out... Led Zeppelin III proves it. Enjoy!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars After the Orgasmic Pleasure, Comes The Folky Treasure., July 23, 2002
By 
Mike (Philadelphia, PA, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
With Led Zeppelin 1 & 2, Led Zeppelin was considered a heavy-blues band, but this album (appropriately entitled Led Zeppelin 3) adds to their genre repretoire with glazes of folk/rock ("Tangerine", "That's The Way"), Country/Rock ("Celebration Day", "Gallows Pole", "Bron-Y-Aur Stomp"), Rocking Ballads ("Immigrant Song", "Out On The Tiles"), and Middle-Eastern Tastes ("Friends"), but still maintaining a blues edge ("Since I've Been Loving You", "Hats Of To (Roy) Harper").
Using these songs, Led Zeppelin was able to add something new to their concerts, Acoustic Sets. It would always be Jimmy Page on Acoustic Guitar, John Paul Jones on Mandolin, Robert Plant singing with an occasional tambourine to shake, and John Bonham playing bongos or shaking a tambourine himself.
Led Zeppelin 3 brought Led Zeppelin more fans in, ones who enjoy folk music. Who knows what will come next after this stunning masterpiece? Well why don't we walk up the "Stairway" and see.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This one you'll learn to love, January 24, 2007
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
In some ways it's very strange that Led Zepplin 3 gets so little recognition compared to Led Zeppelin's other records. Why do i say this? Because, chronologically, this album is right smack in the middle of Led Zeppelin's 4 mega records (1,2,untitled, and houses of the holy, not to mention Physical Graffiti). Then again when listeing to this album it's easy to see why maybe this one wasn't and isn't as popular. It certainly is a different record then the other ones that surround it. Different because it is not as heavy, and relies much more on the acoustic guitar. However, it is still pure Led Zeppelin. Unlike Zep's last two efforts, 3 still has that hardcore blues taste with a metalic twist on it that only Zepplein could provide. In fact, now that i think about, this album really should be rated just as high as their other 5.

At one point, I would often skip this one when listeing to my rotation of Zeppelin albums. I had always ignored it because of what other people said and because of a couple unattentive listenings. But after getting tired of listening to the same Led Zeppelin album, 3 along with "In through the out door" began to grow on me. Now i can't stop listeing to either of them. The same thing happened to me with the doors' waiting for the sun and soft parade.

Anyway, about this record, not one of these songs is weak, even the seemingly (among my friends at least) unpopular "Hats off to Roy Harper". Sure this song is a little weird, but i just can't help but sing-along with its great bluesy feel. Immigrant Song and Since I've been Lovin you are obviously classics, and Out on the tiles is a very underrated riff from Page n' company. Friends/Celebration Day is excellent as well. But the best songs from this masterpiece are the 4 acoustic pieces that i have yet to mention, two of them are ballads, and two are fast paced, honky, tonky, whatever you want to call them, go getters. I'm talking about (take me to the) GALLOWS POLE. A great song which gets faster and faster and makes you want to just clap and tap your feet like theres no tomorrow. Bron-Yr-Aur STOMP has a similar effect, as you can tell by the title. And the other songs i need to mention are Tangerine and That's the way, two wonderful ballads that are really Led's most underrated pieces. When the dust settles, that is to say after you've heard the likes of Stairway to heaven, all my love, and Ten Years Gone, these two here are this band's truly masterful ballads. I want to go in to how beautiful they are but it's just too difficult to describe. So instead i'm just gonna tell you to buy this album if you know some Led Zeppelin stuff. If you don't you should probably start out with something more Zeppy like 1,2 or untitled, but eventually you won't be able to deny the intrigue of Led Zepplein 3, its fascinating cover, and its peculiar absence from the discussion of immortal rock albums.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Trading Smiles, August 6, 2000
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
This is my favourite Led Zeppelin album. When Robert Plant and Jimmy Page considered which songs to perform on their retrospective NO QUARTER, four of them were from LZ III, more than any other album. SINCE I'VE BEEN LOVING YOU has been performed on each and every concert tour since the end of 1969, including the two Page&Plant tours in the 90's. It pre-dates and outlasted STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN. Even critics of the band, point to THAT'S THE WAY as one of the finest compositions from the Page-Plant duo. After releasing two (2!) landmark albums in 1969, Led Zeppelin III offered a change in direction which few pundits understood at that time. IMMIGRANT SONG packs the heavy punch which the fans of the first two albums would have expected. It encapsulates heavy metal's defining elements of a driving beat and forceful vocals with a tale of mythic porportions. Imitated to the point that these are now hackneyed. SINCE I'VE BEEN LOVING you also points backward, as does HATS OFF TO ROY HARPER which relishes in Robert Johnson and GALLOWS POLE which is a rearrangement of a Leadbelly standard. These songs demonstrate the prowess of LZ as blues' interpreters. There are also sketches of what is to come. OUT ON THE TILES, a reference to the morning after a drinking binge, points to BLACK DOG. In the 1973 tour, the opening bars of OOTT were used to tease the audience before BD. TANGERINE, with it's chorded melody, crescendo solo and balance of "softness and hardness" foreshadows STAIRWAY. Off in the distant future the rumblings of ACHILLES LAST STAND can be heard in IMMIGRANT. CELEBRATION DAY is a raucous romp whose lyrical ironies are often overlooked. Finally, for those who dig, the jewels of the album are in the accoustic sets. THAT'S THE WAY and FRIENDS are well written, thoughtful songs, not quite what you would expect from god's hammer. BRON-Y-AUR STOMP is a fun little ditty written to Robert's dog named Strider, after a character in Tolkien's Fellowship of the Rings. If you are interested to know what Led Zeppelin is about, this album will be interesting to you.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zeppelin album that is most personal to me, April 19, 2004
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
Sure, Led Zeppelin could rock, that is undeniable. I have never heard anyone nor will anyone ever be able to play like jimmy page did. He was a God, and Robert Plant's voice was so spiritual and so hard to copy, he is in a league of his own. Zeppelin's first two albums were so sexy and hard that when Zeppelin 3 came out, everyone was shocked to see a lighter side of of the boys.
I think its very important to listen to this album a few times before really judging it, kind of like "Pet Sounds." This album is so haunting its unreal. One time i drove to cleveland and listened to Zeppelin 3 over and over the whole way. Just driving down the highway by yourself in the summer listening to songs like "Thats the way" and "Tangerine" is pure bliss in everyway. songs like this make you really think about where your going in life, especially at my age of 19. These songs are so beautiful and i do not think that Zeppelin could ever touch these types of songs there afterwards. I am so thankful that Zeppelin took some time out of thier hard rocking days to put out something suggestive like this and lovely. I will always consider zeppelin 3 as my favorite zeppelin album because it means so much to me and my direction in life and i will always be greatful for music like this.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A vastly underrated Zeppelin album, December 5, 1999
This review is from: Led Zeppelin III (Audio CD)
The first 5 songs rock. The next five songs are good folk, hippie tunes. It lays the blueprint for the masterful Led Zeppelin IV, but it still stands well enough on its own. The surging "Immigrant Song," the jamming "Celebration Day," the joyous "Bron Aur Stomp," and "Gallows Pole" are classics.
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Led Zeppelin III
Led Zeppelin III by Led Zeppelin (Audio CD - 1994)
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