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Lee's Aide-de-Camp Paperback – April 1, 2000

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About the Author

Frederick Maurice was a British army officer and author who had a particular interest in the American Civil War. Gary W. Gallagher is John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia and the author or editor of numerous books, including Lee the Soldier, also available in a Bison Books edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 313 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books (April 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803282621
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803282629
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,449,209 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful By K. Freeman on March 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
The memoirs of Charles Marshall, Lee's aide. Most editions have footnotes and extensive commentary by Frederick Maurice.

Marshall seems to have been Lee's greatest fan, defending him at all points, claiming to know his mind (even when, as in the instance of Lee's intention to fight a battle during the Gettysburg campaign, other evidence suggests Marshall is mistaken) and fervently exonerating him of all wrong. Little personal reminiscence is here except for concerning Appomattox, although Marshall does vouchsafe the information that the first time he ever heard musket fire was during the battles of the Seven Days and he didn't know at first what he was hearing.

Marshall's memoir is of interest for scholars of Lee and also for those interested in the role of the cavalry during the Gettysburg campaign, because Marshall is one of the major voices to speak up blaming Stuart. I found it interesting to note that Marshall implies the famous confusing order which states "If General Hooker's army remains inactive...but should he not appear to be moving northward" was meant to be worded that way; Marshall goes on to refer to it in the same terms, suggesting there was no error, and also claims that Lee was concerned Hooker might move southward to threaten Richmond. In any case, one may (and probably should) disagree with some of what Marshall has to say but this is an important memoir nonetheless.
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