Legalize It

July 6, 1999 | Format: MP3

$9.90
Song Title
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30
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4:39
30
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3:53
30
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2:25
30
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4:33
30
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3:04
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4:35
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4:56
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6:07
30
9
4:03
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3:15

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 6, 1999
  • Release Date: July 6, 1999
  • Label: Columbia/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 41:30
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138J4VO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,986 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

It's no secret, Peter Tosh is the greatest Wailer!!
Mutulu1
Peter is not an 'egomaniac' as someone on this forum commented; he simply spoke the truth very bluntly and this was a bit too difficult for some people to deal with.
Tekena J. Lawrence
It is one of the greatest reggae albums of all time.
"adonis27375"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Sean M. Kelly on September 21, 2000
Format: Audio CD
More than Bob Marley and Bunny Wailer, it was Peter Tosh who gave the Wailers their harder edge and roots credibility on famous tracks like "400 Years," "One Foundation," as well as his work on "Get Up, Stand Up."
It should come as no surprise, then, that Tosh took on all comers in his solo career, as well, with "Legalize It" and "Equal Rights" being 2 of the most militant offerings this side of Burning Spear's "Marcus Garvey."
On "Legalize It," Tosh's roots sensibilities are sharp, with beautiful rastafarian numbers like "Let Jah Be Praised" mixed well with his all out assaults on the government's anti herb policies, ("Legalize It") and self pity and fear ("Why Must I Cry," "No Sympathy"). He also manages to talk to the naughty side of things on his tracks "Ketchy Shuby," and the Wailers' throwout tune "Brand New Second Hand."
The album's tour de force is Tosh himself, and his voice- a rough and ready, gritty tenor that in no way weraks of complacency; it strikes a deep, resonant chord- that of fear- but can also at moments, like on "Let Jah Be Praised," be almost soothing and re-assuring.
This lp is a must have in any respectable reggae collection, and is one of reggae's shining moments and brilliant debuts.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Channon on February 11, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Peter Tosh's first solo album proved beyond doubt that this artist's talent and vision was far reaching enough to break through the small confines of his little Jamaican island to reverberate across the music world enjoying great critical acclaim being even more popular today than when it was first released.

As one of the original founders of the legendary Wailers, Peter Tosh always felt stifled musically and after Island Records decided to rename the group "Bob Marley & the Wailers" for international appeal it was more than the angry rebel's pride could take. Tosh stayed with the group for their first two albums, contributing much to their initial success with gems like "400 Years," "Stop That Train" and the mighty "Get Up, Stand Up." Not to mention his incredible ability with the guitar, giving the band its original edge. His amazing compositions for songs like "Concrete Jungle," and "Stir It Up" are irreplaceable.

Becoming more disgruntled with all the attention Bob Marley was getting, Tosh finally left the band along with Bunny Livingston to pursue his own solo career. If their were any skeptics as to whether Peter Tosh could make it as an international star without Bob Marley, they were shamelessly silenced in 1976 as "Legalize It" showed that Tosh was more than capable of holding his own. Of course, that's an understatement. The truth is, "Legalize It" has become one of the most colossal Reggae albums of all time!

A photograph of the 6'3" Reggae singer curled up in a field of ganja (perhaps his own), smoking the sacramental herb of the Rastafarian religion in his pipe adorns the cover sleeve. His premature "dreadlocks" crown the head throwing shadows over his eyes; the cover of this album is worth the entire CD!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Tekena J. Lawrence on September 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
"Legalize it", Peter's first solo album after he left the Wailers in 1974, is quite simply his best effort,with 1977's "Equal Rights" coming close and of course more socially and politically relevant. But on the scale of musicality, none touches "Legalize it". The hard-driving rhythm section of the Barrett Brothers...lead guitar from the 'steppin' razor' himself... finally Peter could express himself as a solo artist, free from the artistic constraints of being a Wailer and being in the shadow of his student, Bob Marley. Peter is not an 'egomaniac' as someone on this forum commented; he simply spoke the truth very bluntly and this was a bit too difficult for some people to deal with. Yes he did teach Bob to play the guitar; saying so made it sound like blasphemy. Could it be, as he asserted, that he was just too black for some people? I tend to agree... Nonetheless, this is one of reggae's greatest albums, definitely one that will always find it's way back to my cd player.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mark A. Kintzley on December 30, 2001
Format: Audio CD
If for some reason you have not heard this recording I suggest you trust me and go out and pick this up. Legalize it stands out as one of my all time favorite reggae cd's. It is raw and spiritual.
Peter offers up some powerful music on this one. From the herb anthem Legalize it to the spiritual Igziabeher (Let Jah Be Praised) to the painfully true Brand New Second Hand. Burial starts out with a slow dirge played on horns which quickly changes to the upbeat militant reggae masterpiece. All songs are quality here and will satisfy you greatly.
Do a little research on the man and you will appreciate his music a little more.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Comment Man on July 20, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Tosh created Legalize It immediately following the breakup of the Wailers, about the same time Bob Marley released Rastaman Vibration and Bunny Wailer Blackheart Man--and, to me,it has all these years seemed vastly inferior to those two great records. The vocal was buried a mishmash of strange musical choices. The bass and drums were buried and the immediacy that lends roots reggae so much of its moral authority was lacking. Tosh, or somebody, had buried his music is a plethora of overdubs. It was if, horrors!, I had wandered into a Yes record.

Well, Peter Tosh certainly made it up with Equal Rights, one of the finest roots reggae records ever, and cemented his reputation as a worthy member of the greatest musical group of the Sixties, the Wailers/Upsetters combination. So I did not think about it very much--and I did not listen to Legalize It very much either.

The Legacy Edition's Legalize It linear notes leave something to be desired (I do find it annoying to try and read prose on colored paper with pictures, if anyone who has anything to say about this is bothering to read this.) so I am not sure what happened. BUT (and here I disagree strongly with the other reviewers) the Jamacian mix is vastly different and vastly superior to the mix that Columbia originally released. The vocal is predominant--Tosh's strong bass voice sounds prophetic. The bass and drums are next in the mix and very rootsy. This is an incredibly strong roots album. I will have to live with it a while before decide how good--I already love it and think Columbia did us roots reggae fans a disservice all those years ago, since I find it hard to believe they couldn't have released this version. This is the version of Legalize It to buy.
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