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603 of 607 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tolkien turns Norse
A few corrections need to be made to the reviews already here.

First: This book is NOT a translation. It is a set of two original poems by Tolkien, with supplemental materials. The poems retell one of the most famous stories in Norse legend--the sources are the two Eddas, the Volsunga Saga, and others--but Tolkien gives here his own version. The poem is in the...
Published on May 8, 2009 by Michael B. Sullivan

versus
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fans of saga poetry, Tolkien scholars, and scholars of heathen literature will all want to read this
Sigurd and Gudrun is a series of poems, only some of which are finished, that retell various parts of the ancient legends of Sigurd / Sigmund, Brynhilda, Gudrun, Atli / Attila, the Ring of the Nibelungs, and so forth. Although all of the poems have ancient counterparts, Tolkien's versions are not translations but new tellings of the mythology. Some of his versions show...
Published on November 7, 2011 by Erin Lale


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603 of 607 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tolkien turns Norse, May 8, 2009
This review is from: The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún (Hardcover)
A few corrections need to be made to the reviews already here.

First: This book is NOT a translation. It is a set of two original poems by Tolkien, with supplemental materials. The poems retell one of the most famous stories in Norse legend--the sources are the two Eddas, the Volsunga Saga, and others--but Tolkien gives here his own version. The poem is in the medieval Norse meter and style, but it is a new version, again, not a translation.

Second: These poems are not epics. I have already read a couple of reviews complaining that for epic poetry it isn't "epic" enough. But they aren't intended to be epic. As the introduction makes clear, Norse poetry had no epic mode (although Old English did). What epic verse does for some cultures the Saga did for the Norsemen. These poems are lays, which have a different intended effect, which is discussed in the introduction.

Who needs to read this book? Certainly people who like The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings but hated The Children of Hurin when it came out recently, and who never got through the Silmarillion, will most likely not want this. If, when you read The Lord of the Rings, you skip the poems and songs, you should definitely skip this. On the other hand, if the Tolkien's poetry is especially attractive to you this may interest you. If you're interested in Tolkien's other writings, though, you probably will want this. For instance, if you've read vol. 3 of The History of Middle Earth, The Lays of Beleriand, you will know the sort of thing you're in for. On the other hand, if you don't care or don't know much about Tolkien's own invented mythology, this book will still fascinate you if you have an interest in Old English or medieval Icelandic literature.

While this book is in general unconnected with Tolkien's own Middle-earth, it does shed some interesting light on it here and there. The Sigurd legend is, of course, related to Tolkien's legend of Turin Turambar. Seeing Tolkien in full heathen mode allows us to draw interesting contrasts with the "redeemed" paganism of his own mythology. Furthermore, Tolkien adds certain elements of his own to the traditional story of the Volsungs which are not irrelevant to the interpretation of his other writings. His interpretation of the heathen myth provides clues to his attitude to myth and its creation which are unique in his writings. This is not *merely* a retelling, but an artistic re-working of the old tale in light of his Tolkien's own insights, interests, and concerns, as well as a virtuoso display of versecraft in an authentic medieval style and meter which, to my knowledge, no other modern author has mastered so well.

This book, then, is not for everyone. But all the negative reviews I've seen blame it for not being something else. For what it is, it is excellent. For those interested in its content or its form, and for true lovers of Tolkien's work, it's a must-have.
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116 of 120 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars There is crying of ravens, cold howls the wolf, May 6, 2009
This review is from: The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún (Hardcover)
When J.R.R. Tolkien wasn't teaching philology at Oxford or penning classic fantasy novels, he did some retellings of old poetry. VERY old poetry.

"The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" is one such work: a verse working of the Norse legend of the hero Sigurd and his adventures, as well as the two doomed women who loved him. The wording is a bit awkward in places, and a good chunk of the book's content is commentary by his son Christopher Tolkien -- but the deep-rooted mythic story and Tolkien's vivid prose are gorgeous.

After exploring the gods and their glittering Valholl, Tolkien introduces the bitter dwarf Andvari and his magic ring, the greedy dragon Fafnir, and the tragic tale of Sigmund, Sigurd's daddy. Sigurd was tricked into slaying Fafnir for his treacherous foster father, and gained a hoard of cursed gold and a roasted dragon heart. Then he learns of the beautiful Valkyrie Brynhild, who is doomed to "wed the World's chosen" only, and sleeps in a fortress of flames.

Though he wakes Brynhild, Sigurd claims that he isn't going to marry her until he has a kingdom of his own -- and he gets one too. But in the process, he falls in love with the beautiful Gudrun and marries her. When his brother-in-law Gunnar wants the finest woman in the world, Sigurd tricks Brynhild into marrying Gunnar instead. This betrayal -- and a cursed ring given to both Gudrun and Brynhild -- leads to lies, hatred, death, and a devastating tragedy that destroys more than one person's life.

"The Lay of Gudrun" is a sort of sequel to the Sigurd legend: after Sigurd dies, Gudrun goes a little nuts in her woodland house and ends up being wed against her own wishes (courtesy of her witchy mom) to the king of the Huns, Atli. Of course, everything goes wrong for the poor woman -- and her brothers Gunnar and Hogni rush to attack Atli.

"The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" is not for those who only like to read Tolkien's Middle-Earth stories. Sure, there's a cursed ring and a mention of "Mirkwood," but the rest of it is pure Norse saga infused with gods, sorrow, magic and ancient battles. But it's a fascinating story, and you can hear the ring of the elves and the Rohirrhim in some of the stately passages ("Hail O sunlight/and sun's rising").

It's also very complex story, with lots of gory battles, doomed love affairs, and everybody involved ending up miserable and/or dead -- in particular, the bleak yet exquisite finale of "The Lay of Gudrun" is astonishing. And Tolkien does make you feel for the two lead characters of Sigurd and poor, tragic Gudrun (whose only crime was to love her husband), even if Sigurd is kind of a jerk. Brynhild just comes across as a snotty ice queen.

And Tolkien's wordcraft is pretty smooth, easily read if you're used to epic poetry. There are a few awkward moments ("Last night I lay/where loath me was/with less liking/I may lay me yet"), but most of it is easy to decipher and to follow. And the words are usually quite vivid, beautifully written ("gleaming robed/as flower unfolded/fair at morning") and evocative ("his beard was grey/as bark of ash"), with many moments that are simply beautiful.

For the record: "The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" has a LOT of Christopher Tolkien's forewords, commentary and Tolkien's own information on Norse mythology (for the record, "midgardsormr" means the serpent around the world). There's fifty pages to wade through before the poem even starts. Those with little experience in Norse myth might find it handy, but anyone who already knows the story will find it rather dry.

The legendary JRR Tolkien's working of "The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" is a vivid retelling of this saga, and his unmistakable touch is left on the words. If you can handle epic poetry, this one is definitely worth a read.
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76 of 77 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Book That Is Not For Everyone, May 11, 2009
By 
R.A. (Wisconsin) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún (Hardcover)
So you liked THE LORD OF THE RINGS and THE HOBBIT, and now you want another great reading of Tolkien fantasy? Be careful of THE LEGEND OF SIGURD AND GUDRON. It is a scholarly work. If you are interested in Norse mythology, though, and enjoy reading a good translation of Beowulf (which although not Norse mythology has a lot in common with Old Norse poetry) you will love this book. The tales of Odin and company were told and retold by many poets and saga writers, working hundreds of years apart. Many of their tellings are often contradictory. What Tolkien has done is to recreate a unified Norse mythology and given us new lays, written in English, but following the classic 8 line stanzaic style of the Elder Eddas, the Old Norse poetry form. This also means that there is none of the end rhyming we usually associate with poetry. No, these new lays use alliteration, just as in the Old English Beowulf. It really is a treat to get that style of poetry rendered in English. ( Imagine yourself in an old mead hall, while a gifted bard recites in this long-ago verse form. Better yet, read it out loud and become the bard.)

J.R.R. Tolkien's son, Christopher, has provided fascinating introductory information and explanatory notes that really make the reader feel like a serious student of Norse mythology and Old Norse poetry. This material occupies at least as many pages as the poems themselves. Without this extra material, much of the impact and complexity of the poems would be lost.

If you are serious about understanding the life's work of perhaps the greatest author of the 20th Century and the influences that helped lead him to Middle Earth, take a chance on THE LEGEND OF SIGURD AND GUDRUN.
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26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars There is crying of ravens, cold howls the wolf, May 15, 2009
When J.R.R. Tolkien wasn't teaching philology at Oxford or penning classic fantasy novels, he did some retellings of old poetry. VERY old poetry.

"The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" is one such work: a verse working of the Norse legend of the hero Sigurd and his adventures, as well as the two doomed women who loved him. The wording is a bit awkward in places, and a good chunk of the book's content is commentary by his son Christopher Tolkien -- but the deep-rooted mythic story and Tolkien's vivid prose are gorgeous.

After exploring the gods and their glittering Valholl, Tolkien introduces the bitter dwarf Andvari and his magic ring, the greedy dragon Fafnir, and the tragic tale of Sigmund, Sigurd's daddy. Sigurd was tricked into slaying Fafnir for his treacherous foster father, and gained a hoard of cursed gold and a roasted dragon heart. Then he learns of the beautiful Valkyrie Brynhild, who is doomed to "wed the World's chosen" only, and sleeps in a fortress of flames.

Though he wakes Brynhild, Sigurd claims that he isn't going to marry her until he has a kingdom of his own -- and he gets one too. But in the process, he falls in love with the beautiful Gudrun and marries her. When his brother-in-law Gunnar wants the finest woman in the world, Sigurd tricks Brynhild into marrying Gunnar instead. This betrayal -- and a cursed ring given to both Gudrun and Brynhild -- leads to lies, hatred, death, and a devastating tragedy that destroys more than one person's life.

"The Lay of Gudrun" is a sort of sequel to the Sigurd legend: after Sigurd dies, Gudrun goes a little nuts in her woodland house and ends up being wed against her own wishes (courtesy of her witchy mom) to the king of the Huns, Atli. Of course, everything goes wrong for the poor woman -- and her brothers Gunnar and Hogni rush to attack Atli.

"The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" is not for those who only like to read Tolkien's Middle-Earth stories. Sure, there's a cursed ring and a mention of "Mirkwood," but the rest of it is pure Norse saga infused with gods, sorrow, magic and ancient battles. But it's a fascinating story, and you can hear the ring of the elves and the Rohirrhim in some of the stately passages ("Hail O sunlight/and sun's rising").

It's also very complex story, with lots of gory battles, doomed love affairs, and everybody involved ending up miserable and/or dead -- in particular, the bleak yet exquisite finale of "The Lay of Gudrun" is astonishing. And Tolkien does make you feel for the two lead characters of Sigurd and poor, tragic Gudrun (whose only crime was to love her husband), even if Sigurd is kind of a jerk. Brynhild just comes across as a snotty ice queen.

And Tolkien's wordcraft is pretty smooth, easily read if you're used to epic poetry. There are a few awkward moments ("Last night I lay/where loath me was/with less liking/I may lay me yet"), but most of it is easy to decipher and to follow. And the words are usually quite vivid, beautifully written ("gleaming robed/as flower unfolded/fair at morning") and evocative ("his beard was grey/as bark of ash"), with many moments that are simply beautiful.

For the record: "The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" has a LOT of Christopher Tolkien's forewords, commentary and Tolkien's own information on Norse mythology (for the record, "midgardsormr" means the serpent around the world). There's fifty pages to wade through before the poem even starts. Those with little experience in Norse myth might find it handy, but anyone who already knows the story will find it rather dry.

The legendary JRR Tolkien's working of "The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" is a vivid retelling of this saga, and his unmistakable touch is left on the words. If you can handle epic poetry, this one is definitely worth a read.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the Great Myths of the World, June 3, 2009
By 
Bookreporter (New York, New York) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún (Hardcover)
THE LEGEND OF SIGURD AND GUDRÚN is epic adventure teeming with the ingredients of fantastic myth and wonder: dwarves, wolves, grand heroes, valkyries, gods, a great dragon, and, without coincidence, a powerful magic ring imbued with a curse that will affect the lives of all within the tale. Perhaps the work of composer Richard Wagner has exposed more people to this fantastic Norse legend. Maybe some others have read William Morris's retelling. In any event, the tale is an involved one; it has two tellings, German and Norse, and some of their aspects do not mesh together.

And there is a gap.

The history of the Edda is itself a great story to read up on, but this book by J. R. R. Tolkien is not a historical reference per se. There is a fantastic introduction included here that is a speech Tolkien gave in 1926 about the Elder Edda and the Völsungs, and it gives a sensational overview and historical discussion. From there, Tolkien proceeds to unfold his answer to the gap and problems inherent in the Edda with "The New Lay of the Völsungs" and "The New Lay of Gudrún."

Within these two stories are the adventures of the hero Sigurd and his combat with the dragon Fáfnir. There is also the meeting with and betrayal of Brynhilde the valkyrie, the corruptions and deceptions within the Niflungs, the forced marriage of Gudrún to Atli, the mighty warrior we know as Atilla the Hun, and her revenge against those who fixed the marriage. All great tragedies, all epic and vibrant, and all touched by elements that the author would later borrow to forge his own great myth for England known as THE LORD OF THE RINGS.

Tolkien presents these two tales in their proper verse form, and the work he has done is exceptional. What many overlook about the man is the fact that he was, truly, a master of language, sitting as professor of Anglo-Saxon and English Language and Literature at Oxford. But he also taught courses in Germanic, Medieval Welsh, Gothic, Old Icelandic, and many others, including Old Norse. And his love of Old Norse mythology, including the Völsungs, is documented.

What can be said is that this book will not be for everybody. There are people who are turned off by poetry, and some who decide to try this will likely be turned off even quicker by its strict dedication to the old Norse poetic style. For those who do endeavor to read it and give it proper attention, they will be treated to one of the great myths of the world, written in beautiful language, and will be given a glimpse through a crack in the door at the seed of what would flourish into Tolkien's greatest achievement.

--- Reviewed by Stephen Hubbard
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What Dwarfs do on a Saturday night., June 15, 2009
By 
Scott Downing (Indianapolis, Indiana) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún (Hardcover)
There was a review here that said "If you like Lord of the Rings...", but what the writer failed to understand is that the poems in this book are a part of that same culture, that story in voice that has been passed down generation to generation in the dark cold of the north winter.

I've tried to explain to students before- you can't read Shakespeare and understand it, and it's true with this work as well. It is best read by listening to the flow of the words as they are spoken aloud.

It is almost a theatrical form of story-telling to entertain before all the modern media has taken away our ability to enjoy such things.

Imagine if you will, the cold wind howls outside the longhouse on a dark winters night. Around the fire the people gather, eating and drinking and laughing. Someone calls for a story, and the bard stands and silence descends.

"Of old was an age
when was emptiness
there was sand nor sea
nor surging waves;
unwrought was Earth
unroofed was Heaven-
an abyss yawning, and no blade of grass."

It is a dang good book.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fans of saga poetry, Tolkien scholars, and scholars of heathen literature will all want to read this, November 7, 2011
By 
Sigurd and Gudrun is a series of poems, only some of which are finished, that retell various parts of the ancient legends of Sigurd / Sigmund, Brynhilda, Gudrun, Atli / Attila, the Ring of the Nibelungs, and so forth. Although all of the poems have ancient counterparts, Tolkien's versions are not translations but new tellings of the mythology. Some of his versions show hints of the mythology of his Middle-Earth subcreation as it differed from its ancient source material, the same Northern literature which Tolkien professed at Oxford and which provide the source material for Sigurd and Gudrun.

The saga of Sigurd and Gudrun is present far more clearly here than in the original, showing the hand and mind of a single artist rather than the agglomeration of the ancient epics. The poetry is traditional alliterative saga style, with a few lines identical to the original sources, and is well up to Tolkien's standards.

However, most of this book is not poetry, but footnotes and commentary. Further, the commentary is not by J.R.R. Tolkien, but by his son Christopher, the editor of this volume. Like many posthumously published works, it is not the polished and perfected book that might have resulted had the author published it in his lifetime.

This book will appeal to three types of readers: fans of Tolkien and of saga poetry, serious scholars of Tolkien, and serious scholars of the heathen lore and literature on which Tolkien based his work. Fans will want to skip the commentary and footnotes and read only the poetry. Heathen scholars will want to skip the poetry and read only the footnotes. Scholars of all things Tolkien will want to read both.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars There is crying of ravens, cold howls the wolf, August 24, 2010
When J.R.R. Tolkien wasn't teaching philology at Oxford or penning classic fantasy novels, he did some retellings of old poetry. VERY old poetry.

"The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" is one such work: a verse working of the Norse legend of the hero Sigurd and his adventures, as well as the two doomed women who loved him. The wording is a bit awkward in places, and a good chunk of the book's content is commentary by his son Christopher Tolkien -- but the deep-rooted mythic story and Tolkien's vivid prose are gorgeous.

After exploring the gods and their glittering Valholl, Tolkien introduces the bitter dwarf Andvari and his magic ring, the greedy dragon Fafnir, and the tragic tale of Sigmund, Sigurd's daddy. Sigurd was tricked into slaying Fafnir for his treacherous foster father, and gained a hoard of cursed gold and a roasted dragon heart. Then he learns of the beautiful Valkyrie Brynhild, who is doomed to "wed the World's chosen" only, and sleeps in a fortress of flames.

Though he wakes Brynhild, Sigurd claims that he isn't going to marry her until he has a kingdom of his own -- and he gets one too. But in the process, he falls in love with the beautiful Gudrun and marries her. When his brother-in-law Gunnar wants the finest woman in the world, Sigurd tricks Brynhild into marrying Gunnar instead. This betrayal -- and a cursed ring given to both Gudrun and Brynhild -- leads to lies, hatred, death, and a devastating tragedy that destroys more than one person's life.

"The Lay of Gudrun" is a sort of sequel to the Sigurd legend: after Sigurd dies, Gudrun goes a little nuts in her woodland house and ends up being wed against her own wishes (courtesy of her witchy mom) to the king of the Huns, Atli. Of course, everything goes wrong for the poor woman -- and her brothers Gunnar and Hogni rush to attack Atli.

"The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" is not for those who only like to read Tolkien's Middle-Earth stories. Sure, there's a cursed ring and a mention of "Mirkwood," but the rest of it is pure Norse saga infused with gods, sorrow, magic and ancient battles. But it's a fascinating story, and you can hear the ring of the elves and the Rohirrhim in some of the stately passages ("Hail O sunlight/and sun's rising").

It's also very complex story, with lots of gory battles, doomed love affairs, and everybody involved ending up miserable and/or dead -- in particular, the bleak yet exquisite finale of "The Lay of Gudrun" is astonishing. And Tolkien does make you feel for the two lead characters of Sigurd and poor, tragic Gudrun (whose only crime was to love her husband), even if Sigurd is kind of a jerk. Brynhild just comes across as a snotty ice queen.

And Tolkien's wordcraft is pretty smooth, easily read if you're used to epic poetry. There are a few awkward moments ("Last night I lay/where loath me was/with less liking/I may lay me yet"), but most of it is easy to decipher and to follow. And the words are usually quite vivid, beautifully written ("gleaming robed/as flower unfolded/fair at morning") and evocative ("his beard was grey/as bark of ash"), with many moments that are simply beautiful.

For the record: "The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" has a LOT of Christopher Tolkien's forewords, commentary and Tolkien's own information on Norse mythology (for the record, "midgardsormr" means the serpent around the world). There's fifty pages to wade through before the poem even starts. Those with little experience in Norse myth might find it handy, but anyone who already knows the story will find it rather dry.

The legendary JRR Tolkien's working of "The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun" is a vivid retelling of this saga, and his unmistakable touch is left on the words. If you can handle epic poetry, this one is definitely worth a read.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tolkien As A Master Scholar, May 6, 2009
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This review is from: The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún (Hardcover)
Anyone who reads J.R.R. Tolkien knows that he was an engaging story teller, an erudite scholar, and a lover of language. In The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun we see all three aspects as clearly displayed as in any of his previously published material.

From his earliest school days Tolkien loved the old Norse legends and "The Great Story of the North," told in the ancient Norse languages which were part of the ancestry of Anglo-Saxon. During the 1930s, while simultaneously composing the stories and legends which eventually became The Silmarillion, Tolkien translated the Elder Edda and the Lay of the Volsungs. These are now produced here as The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun, edited by Christopher Tolkien and enhanced with copious material drawn from his father's other writings and lectures.

While this material is a translation and not Tolkien's own creation, thus lacking some magic, it has the potential to be a fascinating read which will open a world as engrossing as anything in Middle earth or Valinor. Much of the verse will remind readers of the heroic songs of the Rohirrim or the Elves. Bill Sanderson's small illustrations, derived from carvings from an ancient Norwegian church and depicting the most famous of Sigurd's deeds, the slaying of the dragon Fafnir, are a very pleasing addition to the text.

The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun will never rival The Lord of the Rings in either sales or reader appeal, but those who have come to love Tolkien's writings dearly will appreciate this glimpse of his scholarly work and how it influenced his legendarium.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good retelling of a powerful story, June 2, 2009
By 
James Corson (College Station, TX) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún (Hardcover)
This is a good retelling of the stories of Sigurd and Gudrun in the Norse tradition. Familiarity with the legend is helpful (try The Nibelungenlied for the German version of the story, The Saga of the Volsungs for the long Norse version, or The Prose Edda for the short Norse version), though not necessary. Also, the verses are very brief, as is typical of Norse poetry, and can be difficult to follow at times. Thankfully, Christopher Tolkien's notes and commentary on his father's poems are clear and insightful. His back matter is an interesting addition, offering a brief look at the historical and mythological origins of the legend.

The legends themselves are, of course, excellent. They should appeal to fans of Tolkien's other novels (The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and the Silmarillion in particular), who will find parallels between the Legend of Sigurd and Gudrun and the aforementioned novels. Recommended for any fan of Tolkien or Norse mythology. Those with a more casual interest in Norse legends or myths may want to start with the Prose Edda instead, though as I said, Christopher Tolkien's commentary provides sufficient context for the Legend.
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The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún
The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún by J. R. R. Tolkien (Hardcover - May 5, 2009)
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