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Legends of the Dark Knight - Marshall Rogers Hardcover – November 22, 2011


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 496 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics (November 16, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401232272
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401232276
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 1.1 x 10.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #115,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Personally, I found much of the rest of the book somewhat disappointing.
David Lawrence
Sometimes its someones hair, other times an object, yet they didn't go further to try some of today's modern coloring techniques.
Ross Bigley
I had'nt read a batman comic book in a while and this is a good way to get back into a classic comics hero.
Mario Luppi

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By David Lawrence on November 28, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book collects all of artist Marshall Rogers work on The Batman, from his well-regarded 1970s stint on Detective Comics to the final work on Batman: Dark Detective in 2005, not quite two dozen stories on all. Despite his limited body of work nobody can doubt the importance of his contribution to the character.

The stories are presented chronologically, so the book begins with a rather lightweight tale in tandem with writer Bob Rozakis. The story features rather forgettable appearances by about half of the Justice League, and a much more amusing supporting bit by the communications exec we all love to hate, the erstwhile Morgan Edge. Of course, in the intervening years life has surpassed art and much of the American public now gets the news from far slimier real life characters, but as almost always Edge is a hoot. The story is goofy fun if you don't think about it too much, if a bit of an odd way to kick off a book featuring the complete output of a major Bat artist.

But the real meat of the book are the Rogers/Steve Englehart collaborations which come next, particularly their initial teaming on Detective Comics. These are stories I remember well...and still have in a longbox somewhere. The soaring towers of architect Rogers certainly influenced the look of the Tim Burton Batman films, so despite his limited body of work Rogers has as much as anybody helped paint the public picture of the character. And no one should overlook the impact of inker Terry Austin; he and Rogers mesh so well it almost seems they were born to work together.

Englehart's stories are in many ways a pastiche, a fond retooling and revisiting of many aspects of the character's background.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Ross Bigley on January 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is not a review of story or art content, it will be on the quality of the look and feel of the book. And it is such a poorly printed project that I feel ripped off. Line work is at times muddy, or missing. It is shocking the lack of care in this.

I had to pull out a few back issues that I own to compare and without a question some of the line work is missing, leaving colored splotches. Inexcusable given the cost of this book. Plus it appears to have been recolored in areas for no real reason. Sometimes its someones hair, other times an object, yet they didn't go further to try some of today's modern coloring techniques. It comes across as half hearted.

Finally, this book I guess was to honor Marshall Rogers contribution to Batman, yet it lacks supplemental material such as the Batman comic strip he drew, or the Batman portfolio he made and the most grievous elimination is the that they left out any information on his passing.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By G. Steirer on December 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As other reviewers have noted, the Marshall Rogers' art for the stories collected here is beautiful and well-worth the cost of the book. The stories too are for the most part quite good, despite a couple light, forgettable tales. For a $50.00 cover price, however, the book's editorial features are terribly disappointing. Despite being a somewhat random collection of stories unified only by the fact that Rogers provided the pencils for them, the book provides no information whatsoever on Rogers as an artist or his importance to the development of Batman. The arrangement of the actual reproduced material is also unnecessarily frustrating: instead of placing reproductions of the various issues' covers before the stories they originally introduced, the book's editor has chosen to group them all at the end. This makes it very difficult to know (for those readers who care) what particular issue you're reading at any time--even with the book's two-page table of contents. As for any kind of bonus material, the book provides none.

Though I think that the quality of Rogers' art is good enough to warrant buying this anyway, I find DC's now long-running shoddy approach to graphic novel production inexcusable. Marvel not only offers much-better produced graphic novels (especially with their Omnibus, Masterworks, and Premiere Edition lines), they also manage to offer them at a cheaper price. Get your act together DC!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Waylon Piercy on September 25, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I've been loving DC's line of Batman collections focusing on specific artists, but I wrestled with buying this one despite its focus on one of my all-time favorites. The problem? I already had everything contained in this collection, most of it in at least two formats! In the end, however, the convenience of having it all in one volume won out. I'm very glad that I gave in to temptation! Reading all of these stories in succession-- something I somehow had never gotten around to doing-- not only refreshed my memories of these tales, but gave me a new appreciation of how well the major ones fit together.

Unfortunately, the weakest story by far is the one that kicks off the volume. If you can get through this middling tale featuring D-list villain the Calculator, you're in for a hell of a ride. The collaboration between Rogers and writer Steve Englehart is absolutely legendary, and it remains so with good reason. So much of the modern depiction of the Batman is in these pages, done far better than most other creators have managed. If you enjoy the Batman animated series of the 1990s, this book is also for you, as that excellent series drew heavily from this run.

Some of the stories following this portion of the collection are far less well known, but they are all worthy tales. "Death Strikes at Midnight and Three," in particular, has long been a favorite of mine. The Roy Thomas-penned origin of the Golden Age Batman of the 1940s is another nice yarn that I hadn't read in far too long.

The collection also includes the five-part tale "Siege," which was plotted by the late, great Archie Goodwin, with the story completed by James Robinson. I had not read this story since these issues were originally released, and I had forgotten just how good this story is.
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