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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the greatest DC Universe stories ever told
Much like what the Dark Phoenix saga over at Marvel did for the X-Men, so did The Great Darkness Saga elevate The Legion of Superheroes to a level of excellence in the early eighties that rival comics would find hard to match. Of course, much of the story-line's success should be attributed to writer Paul Levitz, who went on to become possibly the greatest scribe to ever...
Published on November 25, 2010 by HJ Louw

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not that impressed
I love the legion and have for years. But I find this story a bit disjointed and uninvolving. It just dragged too much in parts, and felt padded.
Published 8 months ago by EE


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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the greatest DC Universe stories ever told, November 25, 2010
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This review is from: Legion of Super-Heroes: The Great Darkness Saga (Deluxe Edition) (Hardcover)
Much like what the Dark Phoenix saga over at Marvel did for the X-Men, so did The Great Darkness Saga elevate The Legion of Superheroes to a level of excellence in the early eighties that rival comics would find hard to match. Of course, much of the story-line's success should be attributed to writer Paul Levitz, who went on to become possibly the greatest scribe to ever pen the Legion. This mammoth hardcover includes at least 400 pages of action, intrigue, horror and suspense, along with stunning art from a variety of pencillers that bring the Legion's 30th century setting to vivid life. As a bonus extra comics were included from before and after the main story that gives new readers a pleasant introduction to a wide variety of interesting superheroes. In total it collects 13 Legion issues, from #284 to 296 of the first series, including a massive annual filled with pulse-pounding superhero battles.

Even with all the awesome extra material, the main story is the real diamond that, in my humble opinion, should be read by every comic book fan on the planet. Not only does it feature one of the most dangerous villains in the DC Universe (trust me, even newcomers to the Legion would know him), but it also contains in-depth character development of all the individual Legionnaires, no small feat when a writer has to juggle dozens of characters. Superboy, Supergirl, Karate Kid, Mon-El, Ultra Boy, Invisible Kid, Blok, Lightning Lad, Saturn Girl, Cosmic Boy, Wildfire, Dawnstar...all of them and many more become characters you care about once the stakes are raised and the universe threatens to go BOOM.

As an earlier reviewer mentioned, the only critique that could apply to this collection is the blatant reveal by the publishers and online stores of the main villain's identity that left readers of the original comics flabbergasted 30 years ago. The entire Saga was originally written with the sole intention of keeping the mystery baddie's identity secret until the very end. However, just one look at the image solicited by Amazon on the product page gives away that revelation that I so enjoyed as a kid reading LSH #293 in my dad's study ages ago.

In spite of this, this collection still garners 5 stars. It is simply one of the greatest comic book stories ever printed. Buy it, and I'm sure you'll agree.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I am suddenly very cold, my friends, and quite scared.", December 9, 2010
By 
H. Bala "Me Too Can Read" (Recently moved back to Carson, California, or as I call it... the center of the universe) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Legion of Super-Heroes: The Great Darkness Saga (Deluxe Edition) (Hardcover)
The Legion of Super-Heroes had been pushed to the brink before, but things were never so dire as when Darkseid, the fearsome God of Apokolips, opened his eyes in the 30th Century and set out to invade the United Planets. This is the Great Darkness Saga, one of the most defining story arcs of the 1980s and in Legion history and, for most people's money, it's what established Paul Levitz as a truly relevant Legion writer.

In the far-flung future, in the 30th century, the United Planets have seen a time of great enlightenment and prosperity. But, even in this wondrous era, there are monsters. And so the Earth-based Legion of Super-Heroes, a group of youths endowed with incredible abilities, patrols the spaceways and planets, troubleshooting and working with the Science Police to keep the peace and safeguard the many alien inhabitants of the known universe.

LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES: THE GREAT DARKNESS SAGA Deluxe Edition collects issues #284-296 and LoSH Annual #1 (featuring Computo). Note that issue #284 coincides with Levitz's return as series writer. The Great Darkness Saga itself takes place in issues #290-294, which means we get about 200 pages of lead-in stories. Bonus material consists of a new intro by Paul Levitz, a reprinting of Levitz's plot directions for Giffen for issues #290 (Chapter One of the Great Darkness Saga) and #294 (final chapter of the Great Darkness Saga), Keith Giffen & Larry Mahlstedt's cover to the original trade collection, Lee Bermejo's variant cover to ADVENTURE COMICS #12, Giffen's rough sketches of eight Legionnaires, and bonus art which served as a full-paged ad for the double-sized issue #294.

If you have the original trade collection (from 1989?), two things really stand out: This deluxe edition doesn't have the 5-paged foldout art which featured relevant characters in the LoSH universe circa 1983 (and its accompanying identification key), and it also doesn't have the epilogue to LoSH Annual #3 which reveals the nature of Darkseid's curse.

Getting to the Great Darkness Saga now, and even though this arc is three decades old, here's the SPOILERS alert.

Ever since their first appearance in ADVENTURE COMICS #247, the Legion had successfully countered some of the most formidable villains the galaxy had ever seen. But these young adventurers face their stiffest test in the shape of Darkseid, who has just woken from a millennium of sleep and now seeks to reclaim his birthright of conquest and destruction. The Great Darkness Saga starts ominously with a drifting dead planet which boasts defenses daunting enough to cow even Mon-El. Then the Legionnaires are confounded by mysterious creatures who end up stealing away with various mystical artifacts, including the legendary sword Excalibur. The Legionnaires learn that these formidable thieves are merely servants of a shadowy presence. So there's serious concern. And when that same presence easily dispatches Mordru and the Time Trapper and siphons off their powers, well, no one puts it better than the cold and analytical Brainiac 5, who somberly tells his fellow heroes: "I am suddenly very cold, my friends, and quite scared."

To balance the epic main storyline Paul Levitz allows various sub-plots to stew in the pot. Firstly, tension mounts as several Legionnaires throw their hats in for the upcomiing election of the new Legion leader. And, as Lightning Lad lies ill, questioning eyes are cast toward Saturn Girl and Timberwolf and that alleged thing going on between them. A disgraced Chameleon Boy is slated to go to trial on charges of treason and life endangerment. Meanwhile, new and French-talking Legionnaire Invisible Kid II is still feeling his way, and, on the Sorcerers' World, a potential Legionnaire is drawn into the fray.

But the side stories get swept away when Darkseid finally makes his big move. Fans of LoSH know that Mon-El, when exposed to a yellow sun, developed super powers to rival the Man of Steel's. Mon-El is from the planet Daxam. This becomes significant once Darkseid gains psychic control over the natives of Daxam and sends them to conquer the United Planets. And there's nothing quite as scary as three friggin' billion Daxamites on the warpath, each as powerful as Superman. With villainy on this scale, it'll take everyone who has ever been a Legionnaire to put up a good fight. Me being a fan of the pre-Crisis Supergirl and of Polar Boy and the Substitute Heroes, this turn of events comes as very cool news.

Salvation arrives, perhaps, embodied in a strange infant summoned forth by the mages on Sorcerers' World. But is that enough? How formidable is Darkseid? Because, even when the Legion and its allies bring their full power to bear, the God of Apokolips isn't defeated as much as temporarily stymied. Darkseid actually has the last laugh with his parting curse (and what a truly messed-up curse it is).

End SPOILERS alert.

I remember the palpable sense of excitement I felt when I read the Great Darkness Saga years and years ago. Re-reading these issues today, I think it's only natural that the story has lost some of its mojo, and for several reasons. First, it's thirty years old, far removed from what's currently going on with the Legion. Second, the revelations which dropped like a bag of hammers on the reader oh so many years ago are now pretty much old news. That sustained element of suspense which kept me so riveted isn't as present now. You look at the trade cover and you instantly identify the Big Bad. And who by now doesn't know Validus's origin? Third, there's some confusion as to whether this arc even falls into today's continuity, what with all the Crisis-y snafus.

But I look at this as a time capsule, to a time when Paul Levitz was just starting his second run at the LoSH. Levitz's strength is that he's able to nicely juggle such a vast assembly of characters, and into this futuristic setting, no less. Yet it doesn't feel claustrophobic or rushed. There's a sense of continuity and a solidity in time and place. Despite the big doings, Levitz throws in little character moments here and there which define each Legionnaire. Levitz writes these stories so that there's that sense of pre-existing history among the characters. Keith Giffen is key in maintaining a visual consistency in the 30th century. His artwork is very decent here, this being before he got all weird with his penciling style.

When you're in the barbershop and talking about the most memorable Legion arcs, the Great Darkness Saga first springs to mind. I like the Legion, but I don't know that I'd call myself a hardcore fan, not having consistently followed this series. But I read the Great Darkness Saga when it came out in the early '80s, and back then it wowwed me, the scope of the story and the sheer sense of adventure and the big, big peril which Levitz injected into it.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best Legion story ever, April 6, 2004
This was the storyline that made me start collecting The Legion of Super-Heroes comics back in 1982. I actually came on board in the middle of the Great Darkness Saga, but quickly scrounged back issues to get the whole story. Everything Levitz and Giffen did afterward was shadowed by this story. Heck, this was where Darkseid made his comeback after being virtually relegated to comic book oblivion in the '70s.
Even when Kirby was writing the Fourth World comics, Darkseid was not the major player in the DC Universe that he is now. But Levitz showed the potential for the character, making him a cosmic villain of universal proportions. Like one of the other reviewers here, Darkseid was new to me simply because I was too young to know about the New Gods. But Levitz used him as a mythic character whose legend would have been known to those who read their Encyclopedia Galactica.
In this story, Darkseid takes a while to reveal himself, working through his "servants of darkness" to procure vessels of power, including living beings he sucks dry of their power. When he does this to Mordru, the Legion know they've got a problem bigger than any they've faced. In one mind-blowing subplot, Darkseid transposes Apokolips with Daxam, giving a yellow sun and the power of Superman to three billion Daxamites he mind-controls.
It's difficult to know whether this remains an official part of Legion continuity because the group has endured so many revamps and rewrites. But it remains an outstanding story. As for Darkseid, this is just one of many possible futures for DC's #1 villain. John Ostrander also did a superb job writing a climactic battle between the Martian Manhunter and Darkseid thousands of years from now.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must have!, April 6, 1998
All through the years, the Legion of Superheroes has been the greatest and most popular superhero group in the comics industry. For any die-hard fan, the highest point in the LSH history has been those wonderful issues written by Paul Levitz, drawn by Keith Giffen and inked by Larry Mahlstedt. A combination between science fiction and magic, this saga tells the story of Darkseid's attempt to take over the 30th. Century universe and the struggle form every legionnaire and hero known to stop him. A strong script from Levitz and the unforgettable art form Giffen/Mahlstedt make this story the most praised adventure from the heroes of the future.

So, if you ever see this book, buy it. It's very difficult to find, and maybe a little expensive but it's worth its price.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back To The Future With The Legion!, November 27, 2010
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This review is from: Legion of Super-Heroes: The Great Darkness Saga (Deluxe Edition) (Hardcover)
In 1982, Paul Levitz took over writing duties on DC Comics' "The Legion Of Super Heroes" for the second time. The result made comics history. Under Levitz's pen, the Legion soared as never before, or since. Fully embracing a cast of over twenty main characters, innumerable supporting players, and an array of locales as vast as space itself, Levitz turned the Legion into one of DC's top titles. Only "The New Teen Titans" rivaled it for sales and acclaim. With penciler Keith Giffen, he found the ideal partner to illustrate his vision of the 30th century. Giffen's sure hand gave life to a fantastical array of otherworldly creations. This volume, which collects issues 284-296 and Annual #1, allows the reader to experience the renaissance of the Legion as it happened.

These issues are famous for including "The Great Darkness Saga". That story arc is notable for molding Darkseid into the preeminent villain of the DC Universe. Previously, his appearances were confined to stories where The New Gods played a central role. After his appearance in "Legion" he began popping up everywhere, including the "Super Friends" cartoon show!

The Legion themselves are portrayed as individuals, whereas before they were often depicted as heroes with little personality. The stories are packed with multiple plots in each issue. Some are resolved quickly, while others fester for a while before reaching their ultimate conclusion. In fact, many sub-plots introduced in this volume are not completed at all. Hopefully, DC will continue to release the Levitz era issues in future volumes.

This collection is highly recommended. The stories are wonderful, and have never looked better. The colors simply pop off the page. This is a must-buy for every comics fan. Long Live The Legion!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not perfect but close, February 5, 2011
By 
Jim Davis (St. Charles, MO USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Legion of Super-Heroes: The Great Darkness Saga (Deluxe Edition) (Hardcover)
Now that Paul Levitz is no longer president of DC Comics and his modesty is no longer standing in the way, his creative material is getting the treatment it has long deserved. Legion of Super-Heroes The Great Darkness Saga collects much more that just the title arc. It starts from the beginning of Levitz's second run as Legion scripter through the five issue Great Darkness Saga and a little beyond.

The pages of the story are reproduced at a slightly larger size than they were originally. The covers however are slightly *smaller* since they can't go to the edge of the page. But curiously each cover shows slightly more on the right and the bottom than the original covers do!

The reproduction is on the whole superb, superior in just about every repect to the original. The paper quality of the early eighties left something to be desired. It was like trying to read in poor lighting. Here everything is sharp, clear, and bright. Details that were hard to make out originally show up beautifully here. It is especially noticeable in scenes with monitors and communicators and *really* noticeable on the two page Legion HQ blueprint spread. The original is completely indecipherable.

The stories have only slight tweaks compared to the originals. There are slight coloring changes but nothing too drastic. The teasers at the end of each issue have been omitted. This process went a little too far as in two cases artwork was omitted. Indeed. in issue 285, page 19, an entire panel was omitted because it was surrounded by teasers.

However, the worst offense was the backup tale in issue 291. Originally, it was drawn by Howard Bender and Rodin Rodriguez. However, for the Great Darkness Saga trade paperback, released in 1989, it was redrawn by Keith Giffen to make the trade an all Giffen issue. The Giffen version is the one we get here. This is a pity because I feel the Bender/Rodriguez version to be much superior as by 1989 Giffen's style had changed dramatically. Surely, in a deluxe edition like this both versions of a 7 page story could have been worked in. I almost knocked off a star for this but I couldn't bring myself to do it.

For those who have the trade the only downside to upgrading is that the deluxe version does not reproduce the Legion poster released at the same time as the issues reprinted, along with their "character key" pages. No doubt including a fold out poster would have increased costs too much. I believe it was also omitted from the second edition of the trade.

The stories themselves are a delight. I was pleasantly surprised how much I enjoyed the stories leading up to Legion Annual 1 and the Great Darkness Saga proper. Legion Annual 1 is also a great story, one of my all time favorites. These days Annuals have to accommodate company wide themes and crossovers and the like. This Annual came from a time when it merely had to have a great story. It was the very first Legion annual and the best in my opinion. It was also DC's first non reprint annual.

When the Great Darkness Saga first appeared Darkseid was not the overexposed villain he later became. This was his first appearance outside of Jack Kirby's "Fourth World" titles.

One thing that does annoy is Levitz's use of the endearment "Love" or "M'love" by every Legionnaire in a relationship whether male or female. It gets monotonous very quickly.

Legion fans will love this volume. For those who don't "get" the Legion, or think it too inaccessible, this is the best introduction you're likely to find. Highly recommended. I can only wish there will be many more followups to this volume.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not Quite Great Enough, but Close, November 22, 2012
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This review is from: Legion of Super-Heroes: The Great Darkness Saga (Deluxe Edition) (Hardcover)
I've been a Legion fan since 1973, and I was really looking forward to this.

I thoroughly enjoyed the story, but two things forced me to knock it down a star. First, the coloring: the modern colors on glossy paper looked horribly garish in comparison to my singles.

The second thing that bothered me is that the backup story from issue 291, which was originally illustrated by Howard Bender, was replaced by the Giffen-drawn version that was included in the original trade. Giffen's art had changed drastically in the intervening period, and the redrawn story looks completely out of place.

I think this book would have looked much better on matte paper and without the redrawn sequence.

The story is still great, the packaging leads something to be desired.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I am suddenly very cold, my friends, and quite scared.", April 12, 2009
By 
H. Bala "Me Too Can Read" (Recently moved back to Carson, California, or as I call it... the center of the universe) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
The Legion of Super-Heroes had been pushed to the brink before, but things were never so dire as when Darkseid, the awesome God of Apokolips, came to the 30th Century and set out to invade the United Planets. This is the Great Darkness Saga, one of the most defining story arcs of the 1980s and in Legion history and, for most people's money, it's what established Paul Levitz as a truly relevant Legion writer.

In the far-flung future, in the 30th century, the United Planets have seen a time of great enlightenment and prosperity. But, even in this wondrous era, there are monsters. And so the Earth-based Legion of Super-Heroes, a group of youths endowed with incredible abilities, patrols the spaceways and planets, troubleshooting and working with the Science Police to keep the peace and safeguard the many alien inhabitants of the known universe.

Even though the Great Darkness Saga is now around three decades old, here comes the SPOILERS ALERT.

Ever since their first appearance in ADVENTURE COMICS #247, the Legion had successfully countered the fearsome villainy of the likes of the Dark Circle, Mordru, the Fatal Five, and the Time Trapper. But these young adventurers face their stiffest test in the shape of Darkseid, who has just woken from a millennium of sleep and now seeks to reclaim his birthright of conquest and destruction. The Great Darkness Saga starts ominously with a drifting dead planet which boasts defenses daunting enough to cow even Mon-El. Then the Legionnaires are confounded by mysterious creatures who end up stealing away with various mystical artifacts, including the legendary sword Excalibur. The Legionnaires learn that these formidable thieves are merely servants of a shadowy presence. So there's serious concern. And when that same presence easily dispatches Mordru and the Time Trapper and siphons off their powers, well, no one puts it better than the cold and analytical Brainiac 5, who somberly tells his fellow heroes: "I am suddenly very cold, my friends, and quite scared."

To balance the epic main storyline Paul Levitz allows various sub-plots to stew in the pot. Firstly, tension mounts as several Legionnaires throw their hats in for the upcomiing election of the new Legion leader. And, as Lightning Lad lies ill, questioning eyes are cast toward Saturn Girl and Timberwolf and that alleged thing going on between them. A disgraced Chameleon Boy is slated to go to trial on charges of treason and life endangerment. Meanwhile, new and French-talking Legionnaire Invisible Kid II is still feeling his way, and, on the Sorcerers' World, a potential Legionnaire is drawn into the fray.

But the side stories get swept away when Darkseid finally makes his big move. Fans of LoSH know that Mon-El, when exposed to a yellow sun, developed super powers to rival the Man of Steel's. Mon-El is from the planet Daxam. This becomes significant once Darkseid gains psychic control over the natives of Daxam and sends them to conquer the United Planets. And there's nothing quite as scary as three friggin' billion Daxamites on the warpath, each as powerful as Superman. With villainy on this scale, it'll take everyone who has ever been a Legionnaire to put up a good fight. Me being a fan of the pre-Crisis Supergirl and of Polar Boy and the Substitute Heroes, this turn of events comes as very cool news.

Salvation arrives, perhaps, embodied in a strange infant summoned forth by the mages on Sorcerers' World. But is that enough? How formidable is Darkseid? Because, even when the Legion and its allies bring their full power to bear, the God of Apokolips isn't defeated as much as temporarily stymied. Darkseid actually has the last laugh, his parting curse coming to fruition in the epilogue of Annual #3 (of which main plot centers on renegade sorcerers attempting to restore Mordru to full power).

I remember the palpable sense of excitement I felt when I read the Great Darkness Saga years and years ago. Re-reading these issues today, I think it's only natural that the story has lost some of its mojo, and for several reasons. First, it's thirty years old, far removed from what's currently going on with the Legion. Second, the revelations which dropped like a bag of hammers on the reader oh so many years ago are now pretty much old news. That sustained element of suspense which kept me so riveted isn't as present now. You look at the trade cover and you instantly identify the Big Bad. And who by now doesn't know Validus's origin? Third, there's some confusion as to whether this arc even falls into today's continuity, what with all the Crisis-y snafus.

But I look at this as a time capsule, to a time when Paul Levitz was just starting his second run at the LoSH. Levitz's strength is that he's able to nicely juggle such a vast assembly of characters, and into this futuristic setting, no less. Yet it doesn't feel claustrophobic or rushed. There's a sense of continuity and a solidity in time and place. Despite the big doings, Levitz throws in little character moments here and there which define each Legionnaire. Levitz writes these stories so that there's that sense of pre-existing history among the characters, that each one of the Legionnaires has a well-developed relationship with the others. That, even when we put down the comic book, the Legionnaires still move about and live their lives. Keith Giffen is key in maintaining a visual consistency in the 30th century. His artwork is very decent here, this being before he got all weird with his pencilling style.

This trade reprints LEGION OF SUPER-HEROES #287 (the prologue segment only), #290-294 & Annual #3, as well as offering an intro by Paul Levitz and a 5-paged foldout featuring relevant characters in the LoSH universe up to around 1983 (when this humongous poster first came out), complete with an identification guide. When trying to think of the most memorable Legion of Super-Heroes arcs, the Great Darkness Saga is not only right up there but may be the first which springs to mind. I like the Legion, but I don't know that I'd call myself a fan, not having consistently followed this series. But I read the Great Darkness Saga when it came out in the early '80s, and back then it wowwed me, the scope of the story and the sheer sense of adventure and big, big peril which Levitz injected into it.

I've enjoyed other amazing Legion story arcs, of course, from the mystery of Sensor Girl to the Eye for an Eye storyline, from the Universo Project to the Legion Lost and Legion of 3 Worlds mini-series. Still, there's no arguing that, in the entire publishing history of the Legion of Super-Heroes and as an exercise in good storytelling, the Great Darkness Saga marks a seminal moment.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Levitz!, February 22, 2013
By 
Sugarbear (Pasco, WA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Legion of Super-Heroes: The Great Darkness Saga (Deluxe Edition) (Hardcover)
I loved following the Legion series from the mid-70's through the mid-90's. To my mind, the Paul Levitz years were the best of them. This storyline is one of my favorites. I remember collecting the series and, every month, the sense of dread grew until the Darkseid reveal capped it off. The struggles that followed seemed so full of desperation that I couldn't wait for the next issue to come out. What a great run and such a nice hardback collection that includes not only the issues, but also supplemental materials to give you a better idea of what happened surrounding the creation of this comics classic!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The standard all Legion stories are measured against, April 29, 2012
This review is from: Legion of Super-Heroes: The Great Darkness Saga (Deluxe Edition) (Hardcover)
There are moments for Legion of Superheroes fans, the death of Ferro Lad, the death of Karate Kid, the pocket universe, but nothing is as Legion as the Great Darkness Saga. Not just a great Legion story, but simply a great story, starts with a mystery to be solved, follows with a lengthy battle, then a victory which is not without its consequences. Worth every penny.
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Legion of Super-Heroes: The Great Darkness Saga (Deluxe Edition)
Legion of Super-Heroes: The Great Darkness Saga (Deluxe Edition) by Paul Levitz (Hardcover - November 23, 2010)
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