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Legislating Morality: Is it Wise? Is it Legal? Is it Possible? Hardcover – July, 1998


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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dr. Norman Geisler is president of Southern Evangelical Seminary in Charlotte, North Carolina. Dr. Geisler holds a B.A. and an M.A. from Wheaton College, a Th.D. from William Tyndale College, and a Ph.D. from Loyola University in Chicago.

Frank Turek is a former assistant professor at George Washington University and is a specialist in Legislative and Regulatory management. He holds a Master of Public Administration from George Washington University and is working toward a Th.M. in Apologetics from Veritas Graduate School. size : 5.4 x 8.3 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Bethany House Pub; First Edition edition (July 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0764220942
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764220944
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,062,890 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Stephe Staedtler on December 25, 2003
Format: Paperback
Many Christians have foolishly bought into public school arguments about separation of church and state. This book goes back to all the court decisions which were made over the last 100 years which led to this common idea we hear today. The book clearly shows that Jefferson never intended separation of church and state the way it is being taken out of context today. I was shocked to find that it isn't even mentioned in the Constitution and am surprised so many Christians have bought into this. I now see that it is "freedom of religion, not freedom from religion." This part to me is the most helpful part of the book. This book will help you not feel like you are somehow "inflicting your religion on someone else" and that all laws are in essence, a legislation of someone's morality.
The book also does an excellent job of tackling issues such as homosexuality, euthenasia, and abortion. The thing I like best about the book, though, is that it shows that the government still has a right to make moral laws. It is not a matter of whether moral laws will be made, it is just a matter of whose morals. I won't say I agree with 100% of what is in this book, but the book is very helpful with debate, especially for those who claim you are forcing your religion on them.
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16 of 22 people found the following review helpful By David Hoshour on July 21, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is the best book I have seen on this topic. Through a very concise and logical presentation, it answers objections from those who are opposed to legislating morality and those that question whether political activism is a proper focus of Christians. A brief history lesson helps put things in perspective. Legislating religion vs. legislating morality is also covered, as are short sections on specific moral issues like abortion and homosexuality. Appendixes include the Declaration of Independence and Amendments to the Constitution.

The book is clear, well-written and well-researched, as you would expect from Norman Geisler or Frank Turek. It is not dry. Every citizen, whether conservative or liberal, should read this book. Conservative Christians will be especially interested.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A viewer in Chicago on October 8, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book is an excellent tool for those of us Christians and conservatives debating these issues with relativists and liberals..Norman Giesler who has been my hero in the faith does a great job along with Frank Turek in addressing the tough issues in our day and age that have brought our society to a modern day Sodom and Gomorah. I challenge liberals to read this book and really examine what it is you believe. The arguments are compelling and convincing. Dr Geisler has debated top athiests and humanists all over the world I think he has done his homework on the subject. EXCELLENT BOOK!!
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11 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Staedtler on February 25, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is an excellent book, not perfect, but it makes a lot of good arguments. Before I go on, I must address the person who criticized Paul Cameron's study which is used. That is backed up in the footnotes in the back of the book with another study, one that has not been disputed. The authors are aware of the claims against Cameron. Now, back to the book. This book has some excellent thoughts about the history of the 1st amendment, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and what the founding fathers actually intended. The book also does a good job showing how liberal activist judges have reinterpreted the constitution. They also make a decent case that all laws are moral laws and that the government has to legislate morality. Sometimes they ask a question and get on a side topic before answering it, or half-answer it, but this book has convinced me that separation of church and state is a farce the way we use it today. The book is definitely worth getting, and helps answer church members who think they can't inflict their morals on others. They can to an extent.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Robert Butler on April 1, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Every home, school, and church should have this book on its shelves. It equips the reader to discuss the vital issues of our culture- even with the secularist who rejects Scripture. Great quotes, illustrations, and brilliant reasoning make this a must-read and a must-have.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By markfaherty on April 29, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book covers its central theme well. Essentially they claim that the founders recognized the existence of an ultimate Moral Truth given by God. The Declaration of Independence lays out the moral foundation for our country and alludes to a creator and inalienable rights. They authors make a strong case for this premise.
There were a couple reasons why I witheld a star.

There is some misinformation or simplifying of facts. I am extremely pro-life and this comment in the book made me very excited as I would have more ammunition for my pro-life argument. (pg 162)"The Supreme Court, as late as 1970 (in Steinberg v. Ohio), only three years before Roe v. Wade, called the unborn a "person" protected under the 14th Amendment." As I had not heard this claim before I attempted to verify it. I found that Steinberg was a case that was cited as an example in Roe v. Wade of a case that had upheld anti-abortion laws. The biggest problem is that it WAS NOT a Supreme Courty case, it was a U.S. District Court Case. Big difference give the context of the author's statement.
Even as a reader who is very sympathetic to what the authors are saying, I found myself questioning other data in the book after this. For example, the information on homosexual mortality which I intend to research. However, if I was someone who was critical of the book to begin with, upon finding this discrepancy, I would probably stop reading and assume that it wasn't an error but deliberate misrepresenation of information.

As Pro-life, we really need to be ultra careful about our facts as so many people who oppose our view are looking for any little thing to discredit us.
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