Lenten Lands: My Childhood with Joy Davidman and C.S. Lewis
 
 


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Lenten Lands: My Childhood with Joy Davidman and C.S. Lewis [Paperback]

Douglas H. Gresham
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)

List Price: $9.99
Price: $8.87 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $1.12 (11%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Friday, July 11? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
‹  Return to Product Overview

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Gresham here recalls his 11 years at The Kilns, a ramshackle house near Oxford owned by the eminent novelist Clive Staples (Jack) Lewis. Son of American novelist W. L. Gresham ( Nightmare Alley ), seven-year-old Douglas went to England in 1952 and, with his recently divorced mother, Joy Davidman, moved in with Lewis, who married her in 1956, when she appeared to be dying of cancer. After her near-miraculous but temporary recovery, and despite Lewis's own increasingly painful osteoporosis, the two were happy together until her death four years later. Gresham writes lovingly of his relationship with them, and with Lewis's alcoholic brother Warnie. He also describes his own happy marriage and eventual settlement in Tasmania as a farmer and broadcaster.
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Joy Davidman Lewis's son refers to his childhood as a "privilege," but the title of his book suggests that it resembled a penetential preparation for adulthood. His own father was alcoholic and sometimes violent; his mother was also abusive, first physically and later emotionally, abandoning her young sons to the cruelties of a mediocre public school so as to be unimpeded in her pursuit of Lewis, who later became Gresham's stepfather. Gresham's desolution at Lewis's death in 1963, his courtship and marriage, and his roustabout life in Australia provide a poignant coda to the story of his childhood. This memoir will enhance Lewis's stature while deepening the mystery of his genuine and passionate love for Joy Davidman. Barbara J. Dunlap, City Coll., CUNY
Copyright 1988 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“A moving recollection of one of the most tender love stories of mid-century.” (Chicago Tribune)

From the Back Cover

There has probably not been a less likely couple: she, an American divorcee and the mother of two young boys; he, an Oxford don and confirmed bachelor who inhabited an eccentric household with his brother, a retired Royal Army major. Yet the relationship of C.S. Lewis and Joy Davidman, as told here by her son Douglas Gresham, was destined to become one of the most deeply moving love stories of the twentieth century.

About the Author

Douglas Gresham is the son of Joy Davidman, who later married C.S. Lewis. As a boy, Gresham lived at "The Kilns," the Oxfordshire home Lewis shared with his brother Warnie, and then Davidman. After many years in Tasmania, Australia, he now lives in County Carlow, Ireland.

‹  Return to Product Overview