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Let It Bleed Original recording remastered, Original recording reissued

528 customer reviews

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Audio CD, Original recording remastered, Original recording reissued, August 27, 2002
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Let It Bleed + Beggars Banquet (Remastered) + Sticky Fingers (2CD Deluxe)
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Product Description

Rolling Stones Photos

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One of the Stones' most beloved albums, 1969's Let It Bleed was a benchmark for several reasons. First, founding guitarist Brian Jones died during the recording process. Second, the Stones take their last significant look at pure blues (Robert Johnson's spooky "Love in Vain") and country ("Country Honk," the two-stepping alter ego of "Honky-Tonk Women") before folding both styles into a cohesive rock & roll vision. Third, it contains some of the band's most eerie hits, such as the flame-enveloped "Gimme Shelter," the drug-reality anthem "Monkey Man," the epic "You Can't Always Get What You Want," and Mick Jagger's menacing "Midnight Rambler." --Steve Knopper


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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
  1. Gimme Shelter 4:30$1.29  Buy MP3 
  2. Love In Vain 4:19$1.29  Buy MP3 
  3. Country Honk 3:07$1.29  Buy MP3 
  4. Live With Me 3:33$1.29  Buy MP3 
  5. Let It Bleed 5:27$1.29  Buy MP3 
  6. Midnight Rambler 6:52$1.29  Buy MP3 
  7. You Got The Silver 2:50$1.29  Buy MP3 
  8. Monkey Man 4:11$1.29  Buy MP3 
  9. You Can't Always Get What You Want 7:28$1.29  Buy MP3 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (August 27, 2002)
  • Original Release Date: 1969
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Original recording reissued
  • Label: ABKCO
  • ASIN: B00006AW2G
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (528 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #353 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

368 of 389 people found the following review helpful By Richard R. Carlton on September 22, 2002
Format: Audio CD
There was only one version of Let It Bleed. This is it. It was released simultaneously in the UK and US on Dec 5, 1969. The Stones had the guts to leave off their July megahit Honky Tonk Woman and instead (much to the chagrin of record company execs) put a countrified satire of their own hit on the album. The Let It Bleed sessions also produced 3 of their finest works that are not on the album (Honky Tonk Woman, Sweet Virginia, and Sister Morphine).
The album contains a huge chunk of the work that made the band famous for this era....Gimme Shelter, Love in Vain, Let It Bleed, Midnight Rambler, and You Can't Always Get What You Want have all pretty much defined not only the Stones but this era of English-speaking history to the world. The album is a staple in every serious rock collection.....it's that simple.
The album has several notable facts:
.....Brian Jones died the same day the last tracks were recorded in London
.....M.C. Escher and photographer Man Ray were both invited to design the cover (they declined)
.....it includes the 1st song not sung by Mick - You Got The Silver, sung by Keith (Mick's version was left in the can)
.....Gimme Shelter was written by Keith while he waited in his car for girlfriend Anita Pallenberg who was starring with Mick (and actually making love instead of only acting) on the set of Performance
.....the Stones have long been accused of stealing many of the song bits from Ry Cooder who was involved in the early sessions and laid down basic tracks that developed into many of the songs
The tracks were recorded between Feb 9 and Jul 2, 1969 at Olympic Sound, London, with final mixing done at Sunset Sound and Elektra Studios in L.A. between Oct 18 and Nov 3.
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95 of 100 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 23, 2002
Format: Audio CD
For my money this is the best Rolling Stones album ever, even if it is really not a typical example of their work. I do not think you can find a better opening to a Stones album than "Gimme Shelter" with Mary Clayton providing awesome guest vocals to some apocalyptic lyrics. The catchy guitar lead suggests bad things are coming this way, a sentiment amplified by the high pitched, wordless vocals and the complimentary piano before the rest of the band crashes in and Mick Jagger starts singing. I also know you can not top "You Can't Always Get What You Want" as the big finale, what with the London Bach Choir lending their voices (not to mention Al Kooper providing the most memorable French Horn work on a sixties rock 'n' roll album). I understand the idea that this is the Stones' response to "Hey Jude," but it certainly stands on its own as a classic pop tune, which makes it a most atypical Stones song on that grounds alone. Then there is the philosophical sentiments of the chorus, which again has you double-checking to make sure this is the same Stones who did "Sympathy for the Devil" and were the acknowledged bad boys of rock 'n' roll.

"Midnight Rambler," which originally began Side 2 in those days of vinyl, is another one of those most rare long Stones songs and featured Mick Jagger wailing on his harp. "Monkey Man" is my all time favorite non-Stones hit song with Jagger pointing out " I hope we're not too messianic or a trifle too satanic" (I used it for a class assignment once as the music background for a Pat Paulsen speech) and "Country Honk" is a countrified version of their hit "Honky Tonk Woman." You also have a couple of acoustic blues tracks with "You Got the Silver," which offers up the first lead vocals by Keith Richards, and a cover of Robert Johnson's "Love in Vain.
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60 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Brian D. Rubendall HALL OF FAME on June 11, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Released way back in 1969, "Let it Bleed" finds The Rolling Stones at their absolute creative peak. Though it was released as part of a string of masterpiece albums the band recorded between 1968 and 1972, the argument can be made that "Bleed" stands ever so slightly above the rest. The Stones' countryfied rock has never sounded better, and is a major source of inspiration to today's "alt. country" movement.
The album would be worthwhile even if all it contains was thier best "epic" song, "You Can't Always Get What You Want." But in addition are the other two monster hits: "Gimmie Shelter" and "Midnight Rambler." The title track rocks gently, while "Country Honk" is a teriffic reworking of "Honky Tonk Girls." Even one of the lesser known tracks, "Monkey Man," was used with tremendous effect by Director Martin Scorsese in the movie "Goodfellas." The digitally remastered CD provides particular sonic clarity, making the album sound as if it was just recorded last week.
Overall, an absolute masterpiece that is one of the many highlights of the Stones' career.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Richard R. Carlton on September 22, 2002
Format: Audio CD
There was only one version of Let It Bleed. This is it. It was released simultaneously in the UK and US on Dec 5, 1969. The Stones had the guts to leave off their July megahit Honky Tonk Woman and instead (much to the chagrin of record company execs) put a countrified satire of their own hit on the album. The Let It Bleed sessions also produced 3 of their finest works that are not on the album (Honky Tonk Woman, Sweet Virginia, and Sister Morphine).
The album contains a huge chunk of the work that made the band famous for this era....Gimme Shelter, Love in Vain, Let It Bleed, Midnight Rambler, and You Can't Always Get What You Want have all pretty much defined not only the Stones but this era of English-speaking history to the world. The album is a staple in every serious rock collection.....it's that simple.
The album has several notable facts:
.....Brian Jones died the same day the last tracks were recorded in London
.....M.C. Escher and photographer Man Ray were both invited to design the cover (they declined)
.....it includes the 1st song not sung by Mick - You Got The Silver, sung by Keith (Mick's version was left in the can)
.....Gimme Shelter was written by Keith while he waited in his car for girlfriend Anita Pallenberg who was starring with Mick (and actually making love instead of only acting) on the set of Performance
.....the Stones have long been accused of stealing many of the song bits from Ry Cooder who was involved in the early sessions and laid down basic tracks that developed into many of the songs
The tracks were recorded between Feb 9 and Jul 2, 1969 at Olympic Sound, London, with final mixing done at Sunset Sound and Elektra Studios in L.A. between Oct 18 and Nov 3.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

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I want to live in the 60's!
James,

Music-wise, and as a social activist, yes -- the '60's would have been tops.

BUT...remember that, as young men, we would have been eligible to be drafted into a prolonged and mindless war, and treated like crap when we came home (if we indeed served). Also remember that we lost some of... Read More
Aug 22, 2011 by Robert Bykowski |  See all 5 posts
1969... the greatest year ever for rock music?
all of thoose are correct, except for Black Sabbath, that was released in 1970. I'd have to say 1969, 1971, or 1973 is the best year of music for me...
Nov 27, 2008 by Rock 'N Roll |  See all 28 posts
Is this one still in a jewel case?
The "soft" cardboard ones are called digipaks. This one came out in 2002 in a digipak, as did all of the these Stones remastered hybrid SACD releases. The 2002 remastered ones that come in a plastic case are not SACD hybrid disks. It is apparently not possible to tell whether this... Read More
Aug 22, 2008 by Mark Abramowitz |  See all 4 posts
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