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Let the Celebrations Begin! Paperback – March, 1996


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Orchard Books (NY) (March 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 053107076X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0531070765
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.3 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,609,774 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Set in a Nazi concentration camp just before liberation, this picture book "will raise disturbing questions, but leaves it to others to offer the even more disturbing answers," said PW. Ages 3-6.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Grade 4 Up-- From a sentence in a volume on antique toys and a short narrative description of the moment of liberation in one Nazi concentration camp, Wild has created this moving scenario. Told in first person by a young woman inmate of Bergen Belsen, this poignant vignette relates how a few women used scraps of material--many torn from their own ragged clothing--to create stuffed toys to be given to the few remaining children when the camp was liberated. Only adults and older children acquainted with Hitler's Holocaust will be able to appreciate this tribute to the stalwart women of the story, who, rising above hunger, deprivation, and inhuman living conditions, held fast to their belief that salvation would come. Against stark white backgrounds, Vivas has painted the small group of raggedly clothed, stubble-haired, thin-legged women and children; all of their faces radiate hope. This is a work of love. Its brief text and picture book format belie the sophisticated message that it bears. To those who understand, it will bring disturbing, heart-rending feelings of sadness. But these are the survivors, and their story must be told. --Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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Imagine then my surprise when I saw a children’s picture book that even broached the story of The Holocaust!
Vera
I had been putting together a collection of books for young readers on Holocaust themes for a school library when I found this book.
P Tupper
The illustrations are wonderful and the story demonstrates resilience and hope that are applicable to anyone.
JM Rees

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By P Tupper on December 9, 1999
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I had been putting together a collection of books for young readers on Holocaust themes for a school library when I found this book. It is so heartbreakingly brave, beautiful, and uplifting! The illustrations have a charming dignity. The fact of the camp existance is brought out gently, yet compellingly. Most of all, the book is a testimony of the triumph of the human heart. I highly recommend it to persons introducing the facts of that historical period to very young readers.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
I have used this book to teach my second and third grade students about the Holocaust. The story and the pictures bring to life the horror of the Holocaust and temper it with the hope for the future. The book has become one of my favorites. I strongly encourage anyone who teaches about the Holocaust to include this book in their collection.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vera on December 22, 2014
Format: Hardcover
ISBN-13: 978-0763670139
The story absolutely must be told, and retold, and then told again. This terrible, tragic time in history must never be forgotten.

Imagine then my surprise when I saw a children’s picture book that even broached the story of The Holocaust! I thought there was no way this horror could be told or pictured for the ears and eyes of the young. But of course, the young were there experiencing that terrible time.

Then I realized the author and illustrator had taken that very facet – children in a place of horror, their need for toys, and the kindness of others in that terrible place. Then they wove a gentle story and illustrated it realistically in soft colors (perhaps to soften the harshness of that place and time). It is a story of believing they would be liberated and planning to have a children's party and providing toys for the children. Toys made by the women out of scraps - bit and pieces, bits of thread - from their own threadbare clothes. Toys for the children for this party when the soldiers would come and free them all.

There is a “small collection of stuffed toys preserved that were made by Polish women in Belsen.” The story includes the women and children that had survived waiting for soldiers to open the gates and let them out. To rescue them.

Children will ask questions as you read this book to them. The pictures show the women and children in rags. They have no hair. They are very hungry. This gentle book will afford an opportunity for parent or teacher to gently explain how horrible that time was but how strong the human spirit can be.

DISCLOSURE: I was provided a complimentary copy by Candlewick Press in exchange for my review. Opinions expressed are solely my own. I received no compensation for this review.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By JM Rees on December 20, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful book for children about a horrifying part of human history. There is hope and resilience as well as an introduction to the deprivation that happened at the concentration camps. The illustrations are wonderful and the story demonstrates resilience and hope that are applicable to anyone.
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