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"Let's Get a Pup!" Said Kate Hardcover – August 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 and up
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Lexile Measure: 350L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick; 1st U.S. ed edition (August 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0763614521
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763614522
  • Product Dimensions: 10.5 x 0.4 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,612,902 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Dog lover Graham (Max) adds another tail-wagging treat of a picture book to an oeuvre that includes the canine-inspired titles Benny and Queenie, One of the Family. Following the death of her cat, young Kate has grown lonesome for a new pet. Mom and Dad quickly catch Kate's enthusiasm when she suggests, "Let's get a pup!" and the family heads to the local animal Rescue Center. After looking over "fighters and biters, growlers and snarlers, short dogs, dogs long and thin, and dogs with their cheeks sucked in" they see a smallish, frisky puppy that's just right. As they exit the Rescue Center with their new pup, Dave, the family sees a large, sweet-natured older dog that tugs at their hearts. A sleepless night passes for everyone and the next day Kate's family rushes back to the shelter and expands their brood by one more the older dog they now call Rosy. Graham once again depicts common family situations with abundant humor and tenderness. His jaunty pen-and-ink and watercolor artwork captures universal themes with a contemporary spark thanks to his renderings of unconventional-looking parents (Mom and Dad both have piercings; Mom sports a tattoo). Throughout, copious white space and spot vignettes give the proceedings a breezy pace. Ages 3-6.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Kindergarten-Grade 2-When Kate and her parents visit an animal shelter, they first bring home a precious puppy, then return to adopt an older dog that had also captured their hearts. Graham's cartoon-style, plump figures include a Mom with a tattoo and nose ring, and a disheveled Dad. The cozy domestic scenes include typical particulars like a forgotten piece of toast, toys on the floor, and cleaning gear in the bathroom. With the comprehensive characterization chronicled in these pen-and-ink and watercolor panoramas, readers easily embrace this family whose affections extend to include pets on the bed. This endearing book successfully compels those previously pledged to pedigree puppies to try an alternative route.
Gay Lynn Van Vleck, Henrico County Library, Glen Allen, VA
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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This would be great for kinder through 2nd grade.
Mandaa
This is a great picture book about a family wanting to by a dog because their beloved pet passed away.
jfn
Let's get a pup Human desire for companionship is what let's get a pup is all about!
jermainea1

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Vicki Stevens on December 12, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The image on the dad's shirt is NOT a cigarette (in fact, the mom sports an anti-smoking t-shirt in one illustration), it is a match which changes form in accordance with his feelings/state-of-mind. It is lit when he goes to the shelter to adopt a pup; the flame is extinguished when he leaves poor Rosie behind in her cage; and then it changes into a lit lightbulb ("eureka!")when he returns to rescue Rosie.
As for the young couple having tattoos and piercings--this fits in perfectly with the book's theme, which is that we should appreciate beings for who they are on the inside, rather than judge them for what they look like on the outside.
This is a beautiful book that has won a slew of awards and special mentions. Highly recommended as a means of teaching empathy and acceptance.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Lady Disdain on March 13, 2007
Format: Hardcover
If you've never seen a parent with a piercing or a tattoo, then you are living on a deserted island somewhere. Also, if you think that's a cigarette on dad's shirt, then you haven't actually read the book, because it's more than clear that it is a match. I don't think a match on a shirt is telling children to set things on fire, or whatever some of these reviewers seem to think. This book by Australian Bob Graham is a really lovely story, beautifully drawn and wonderfully written, and (while it is not the book's primary intent to do so) shows a family that looks much closer to what a lot of today's families look like than what some of the reviewers here would have us believe.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By alana d. on August 7, 2007
Format: Paperback
I was first introduced to this book in a first grade classroom I was assisting in. I was struck by the wonderful illustrations that are central to the story. The presence of a close, loving, cultured family who appear to be 'alternative' or 'counter-culture' is so refreshing to see in a children's picture book! This was one of the first paperback books I bought for my then 1 year old daughter. She's 18 months now and loves this story! She enjoys pointing out little details in the illustrations (such as Rosy getting a bath.) As she gets older, if she questions other details (such as whether it's a match or a cigarette on the fathers shirt) I will SO welcome the opportunity to have a real conversation with her and make connections to the real world. This book is a true gift! Anyone who doesn't see it that way is missing out on opportunities to connect with your children about what's real in this world.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on April 23, 2004
Format: Hardcover
The book of Generation X parents. Where else are you going to locate a loving family story that contains a nose-pierced tattooed mom and a earring sporting side-burn shaved pop? Maybe there are plenty out there, but how many are good? Author/illustrator Bob Graham has penned a touching tale of a girl's wish for a dog of her own.
Kate hasn't had a pet since her cat died. Enthused one morning she leaps into her parents' bedroom proclaiming the need to get a pup tout suite. Her parents, a grungy amiable crew, agree immediately and it's off to the nearest pet shelter. Once there, they immediately locate a cute lively puppy that meets all their needs. But on the way out a big old dog named Rosie captures their hearts as well and it is with a sad heart that they leave without her. By the end, however, everything has worked out for the best and now the two dog family can get back to normal.
This is just a great book. Apart from the enthusiastic and enjoyable illustrations, there's a real sense of "home" to this story. This is one of those rare picture books where you feel you could really walk into this house and feel it was a real place. There's clutter and mess, but nothing more than you'd find in your average house with a kid. The dad makes lame jokes, the mom wears burkes and has the odd pantyhoe sticking out of her dresser drawer. And Kate, the kid, is just your usual ragamuffin urchin, hankering for a pet or two to sleep with her at night. I don't know why, but I really felt this story took place in Seattle too. Something about the people and the views of the town from their front door. And the story's just great. It's all about loving dogs regardless of age. About making a home out of different kinds of people and creatures.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca on October 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This wonderful book won the 2002 Boston Globe - Horn Book picture book award and for good reason. Brimming with love and appeal, this charming story will tug at your heartstrings and remind you of how pets adopt us as much as we adopt them, and how they return with gratitude the love and comfort that we give them.
Here is a *real* family, with children's drawings taped up around the house and the occasional sock hanging out of a drawer. The love and caring that the family members feel for each other is palpable. As for the dad's shirts, they often reflect his mood: the shirt bearing the image of a lit match changes to an extinguished one when the family wistfully leaves the shelter without Rosy. And when the family hits upon a new idea, the dad's shirt shows a lit bulb. As for messages, in one scene, the mother is wearing a shirt with the familiar "No Smoking" image of a red line through an encircled cigarette. Bob Graham is a warm, sincere and caring man (and father) who would *never* send unhealthy messages in his work.
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