Buy Used
$599.00
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shows light shelfwear. Clean and unmarked text. Stored, sold and shipped by Amazon. Free two-day shipping for prime members. Free shipping on orders over $35 for everyone. No hassle returns. Exactly as shown in photo.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Let's Get Real: What People of Color Can't Say and Whites Won't Ask About Racism Paperback – 2011


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$47.35 $47.21

The Calendar of Loss by Dagmawi Woubshet
The Calendar of Loss by Dagmawi Woubshet
This innovative and moving study illuminates how AIDS mourners—particularly in 1980s Ethiopia—grappled with the death of lovers and friends. Learn more | See similar books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 283 pages
  • Publisher: StirFry Seminars & Consulting, Inc. (2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1450763677
  • ISBN-13: 978-1450763677
  • ASIN: B007F1S73O
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 5.9 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,302,071 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Share your thoughts with other customers

More About the Author

Lee Mun Wah's Life Journey

Lee Mun Wah is an internationally renowned Chinese American documentary filmmaker, author, poet, Asian folk teller, educator, community therapist and master diversity trainer. For more than 25 years he was a resource specialist and counselor in the San Francisco Unified School District. He later became a consultant to private schools, working with students that had severe learning and behavioral issues.

Lee Mun Wah is Executive Director of StirFry Seminars & Consulting, a diversity training company that provides educational tools and workshops on issues pertaining to cross-cultural communication and awareness, mindful facilitation, and conflict mediation techniques. Thousands of people from government and social service agencies, corporations and educational institutions have taken Lee Mun Wah's workshops and partnered with StirFry Seminars & Consulting on their diversity initiatives.

His first film, Stolen Ground, about the experience of Asian Americans, won honorable mention at the San Francisco International Film Festival, and his most famous film about racism, The Color of Fear, won the Gold Medal for Best Social Studies Documentary. Part Two of this film, Walking Each Other Home, won the Cindy Competition Silver Medal for Social Science. In 1995, Oprah Winfrey did a one-hour special on Lee Mun Wah's life and work that was seen by over 15 million viewers internationally.

In 2005, Lee Mun Wah directed and produced the film, Last Chance for Eden, a three-part documentary on sexism and racism. Also that year, he published The Art of Mindful Facilitation, sharing his experience, techniques, and expertise with students, therapists, and other diversity trainers. His newest book, Let's Get Real -What People of Color Can't Say & Whites Won't Ask About Racism, along with the film, If These Halls Could Talk, the first release of an educational training series focusing on college students and their perspectives on race and racism, were both released the fall of 2011. The Feature Film edition and extended Instructional Edition of If These Halls Could Talk will be released later this year. Lee Mun Wah will be sharing his unique style of diversity training through online classes and webinars later this year.

It is Lee Mun Wah's belief that we cannot wait until tomorrow for some charismatic leader to appear who will bring us all together. We each must take a stand and personally participate in this important journey of confronting our fears and beginning a conversation not only with those we love but also with those we have been taught to fear. We cannot continue being separate and unequal without there being a cost to each and every generation. Our survival and the very future of our children depend on all of us embracing our differences as well as our mutuality. If we can accomplish this in our lifetime, we can then look back and know that we have found a way to live together authentically and harmoniously, using and honoring all of our gifts and special contributions. To Lee Mun Wah, that is the true meaning of multiculturalism.