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Let's Get This Party Haunted! (Mostly Ghostly) Hardcover – July 12, 2005


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 3 - 7
  • Lexile Measure: 480L (What's this?)
  • Series: Mostly Ghostly (Book 6)
  • Hardcover: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers; First Edition edition (July 12, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385746938
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385746939
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6.3 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,510,249 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

R. L. Stine began his writing career when he was nine years old, and today he has achieved the position of the bestselling children’s author in history. In the early 1990s, Stine was catapulted to fame when he wrote the unprecedented bestselling Goosebumps® series, which sold more than 250 million copies and became a worldwide media phenomenon.

R.L. Stine has received numerous awards of recognition. He lives in New York, NY.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

11

At dinner that night, Mom was very upset. She told Dad the whole story. “The principal called me this afternoon. Max told a teacher to shut up. And he tossed clay all over the art room.”

Dad’s face turned even redder than usual. Steam started to pour from his ears. He gripped his fork and knife in his big, meaty fists. “In trouble again? Why did you do that, Max?”

“Hard to explain,” I muttered.

The dragon tattoo on Dad’s right bicep appeared to lower its fiery head and stare at me. “Why can’t you be more like Colin?” Dad growled. “Is that asking too much? Colin is perfect. Why can’t you be perfect?”

“I don’t know,” I whispered, head down.

Colin kicked me hard under the table. Then, grinning, he pulled out a sheet of paper. “Here is my new honor roll certificate,” he told Dad. “Would you like to get it framed like all the others?”

I was grounded for a week. I didn’t see Nicky or Tara the whole time. I knew they were angry at me. Angry because I’d told them to stay away from my birthday party.

But I didn’t expect them to totally disappear.

A week after the pottery room incident, Quentin came over to practice magic tricks. My party was only a few days away. I wanted to rehearse and rehearse until our act was perfect.

After all, Traci Wayne was coming. I wasn’t allowed to get near her. But this was my big chance to impress her.

“Let me show you a hat trick that everyone loves,” Quentin said. “Do you have a real hat I could use?”

I rubbed my chin, thinking hard. “No. I only have baseball caps,” I said. “Oh, wait. My dad has a really good hat he uses for weddings and funerals and things.”

“Go get it,” Quentin said. “You’ll like this trick.”

I hesitated. “But it’s my dad’s only hat, and it’s very expensive. You have to be very careful.”

“No problem,” Quentin said. “The trick is perfectly safe. I’ve done it a thousand times.”

I went down to my parents’ bedroom closet to borrow Dad’s hat. He and Mom were in the den, watching wrestling on TV. They were both shouting at the screen: “Kill him! Kill! Kill! Break him in two!”

They both love wrestling. But sometimes they get carried away. Last week after a big match, Mom jumped on Dad and started slapping his bald head with both hands. He had to pick her up and carry her into the shower to snap her out of it.

I pulled Dad’s hat down from the top shelf. And I also borrowed one of his neckties. He only has three, but I don’t think I’ve ever seen him wear one. I had learned a nifty new necktie trick that I knew Quentin would love.

“Kill! Kill! Ruin him!” My parents’ shouts rang out from the den.

Back in my room, I handed Quentin the hat.

“What’s the trick?” I asked. “Will it be good for the party?”

He nodded. He pulled a few things from his magic kit. He held up two eggs. “I crack these two eggs into the hat,” he said. “Then I pour in this jar of honey. Then I turn the hat right side up, and it’s perfectly dry.”

I gulped. “Are you sure about this?”

“Of course I’m sure,” Quentin said. “It’s an easy trick. Watch.”

He pushed his blond hair off his forehead. Then he cracked the two eggs and let them run into the hat. Then he opened the honey jar and turned it upside down, and the honey slowly oozed into the hat with the egg yolks.

“Say the magic words!” Quentin cried. “Hat be good!” He turned the hat over–and honey and yellow egg yolk came dripping out.

“You–you ruined my dad’s hat!” I wailed.

Quentin squinted at the sticky mess inside the hat. “I don’t get it. That trick always works.”

My heart started leaping in my chest. I shoved the hat under my bed. Later I’d have to figure out a good hiding place for it.

“What’s up with the necktie?” Quentin asked, picking up the tie and pulling it through his fingers.

“Here’s a good trick for the party,” I said. “And this one is totally safe.”

I took the tie from him and picked up a pair of scissors. “See? I make it look like I cut the tie into four pieces. But I don’t really cut it. I cut this piece of cloth instead.”

I pulled the cloth from my magic kit and tucked it under the tie. “Now watch,” I said. “It looks like I’ve cut the tie up. But when I tug on it, it’s all together again.”

“Cool,” Quentin muttered.

“Ladies and gentlemen,” I boomed, holding the tie in front of me. “The Amazing Indestructible Necktie!”

I snipped it into four pieces. I balled the pieces up in my hand. And then I gave a hard tug. “Back together again!” I exclaimed.

Wrong.

I’d sliced my dad’s tie into four pieces.

“Oh, wow.” I stared at the pieces of tie in my hand.

Then I pictured my dad, as big as a truck, a bellowing bull when he was angry. When he saw what I’d done to his hat and tie, he’d . . . he’d . . .

I couldn’t even think about it.

Trembling, I shoved the pieces of necktie under my bed next to the hat.

Quentin tried a few easy card tricks. The cards fell from his hands and scattered over the floor.

He tried the trick where he waves his magic wand and it turns into a bouquet of flowers. It didn’t work. The wand broke in two.

He shook his head. “Max, everything is messed up tonight. I can’t figure out why.”

I could.

I knew what was happening. Nicky and Tara were messing up our tricks.

I gritted my teeth and balled my hands into fists. I felt so angry, I wanted to scream.

But no way could I tell Quentin about them.

Nicky and Tara were angry because they couldn’t come to my party. So they were doing their best to mess up our magic act.

We tried a few more easy tricks, and they were ruined too. “It just isn’t our night,” Quentin said. “Maybe we should try again tomorrow night.”

He left, shaking his head, very confused.

As soon as he was out the door, my two ghost friends appeared. “How’s it going, Max?” Tara asked, grinning at me.

“You know how it’s going,” I snapped.

“Did you have a bad night?” Nicky asked, acting innocent.

I realized I was grinding my teeth. I’d never been so angry at them. “You have no right to do that,” I shouted. “You have no right to ruin all our tricks.”

“I’ll bet your tricks will go a lot better if you invite us to your party,” Tara said.

“For sure,” Nicky chimed in. “Invite us to your birthday party, and we’ll be your best friends again.”

“No way!” I cried. “You’re not my best friends. And stop begging me. No way are you coming to my party!”

They both put on these really hurt faces. Tara pulled off her hat, tossed it on the floor, and started stomping on it.

I turned away from them and walked to the window. I took deep breaths, trying to calm down. I didn’t like being angry at them. They were two poor young ghosts, after all. They probably wouldn’t have any more birthdays–because they were dead.

But messing up our magic tricks like that was just plain mean.

I gazed out the window, pressing my forehead against the cool glass. A few stars twinkled dimly in the night sky. I lowered my eyes–and gasped when I saw the boy in black staring up at me. He stood at the side of my yard, leaning against a tree trunk.

I pulled up the window, stuck my head out, and shouted down at him. “Go away! I’m warning you! Go away!”

He took a few steps closer to the house. Light from the kitchen downstairs washed over him, and I saw his face. An old man’s face, lined and wrinkled and sagging.

He cupped his hands around his mouth and called up to me. “Be careful!”

Gripping the windowsill, I stared down at his ancient face, at his pale, sunken eyes. “What do you want?” I screamed. “Why are you doing this?”

“Be careful,” he repeated in a breathy rasp of a voice. “They are going to kill you. The ghosts are going to kill you!”

A chill ran down my back. I stepped away from the window. Shivering, I turned to Nicky and Tara.

“What did he mean?” I asked. “Why did he say that? Why did he say you are going to kill me?”

I saw the shock on Nicky’s and Tara’s faces.

And then they disappeared.

More About the Author

Why is Tim Jacobus R.L. Stine's favorite illustrator? Maybe because they've done so many scary books together. Tim did the cover paintings for more than 80 Goosebumps books, as well as the six amazing Amazon books. Recently, the two of them got together and asked the questions they've always wanted to ask each other...

~~~~

TIM (the illustrator) asks R.L. STINE (the author):

TIM: When I illustrate, I can "see" the image in my head before I start to draw. Do you "hear" a story when you write?

R.L.: I hear kids when I write. I try to hear the voice of the boy or girl who is telling the story. I visit schools a lot and talk with kids so I can keep up with what they are saying these days and what real kids sound like. Then I try to hear their voices tell the story as I write it.

~

TIM: You've written so many books I can't do the math, but I bet you've used millions of words. What's you favorite word?

R.L.: Someone once got in an elevator with a very witty author named Noel Coward and said, "Say something funny." And Coward said, "Kangaroo." Kangaroo has been a favorite word of mine ever since I heard that story. But as a horror writer, I guess my favorite word is SCREAM!

~

TIM: Where is the strangest place you have come up with an idea for a story?

R.L.: An empty movie theater. My wife and I went to see a scary movie in a big, old movie house-- and we were the only ones in the theater. It was kind of creepy. Then about halfway through the movie, I turned around and saw that the back row was filled with people sitting straight and still. Suddenly, I thought-- They are zombies! I'm trapped in a dark zombie theater! And that's where the idea for the book Zombie Town came from.

~

TIM: If you couldn't write-- and you possessed all skills-- what would you like to do for a living?

R.L.: I drew comic strips from the time I was in 4th grade, and I always dreamed of being a cartoonist. You can imagine my shock when the other kids told me how bad my art was. They were right. I stunk! I got over my extreme disappointment by starting to write. But if I had the skill, I would love to do what you do, Tim.

**********

R.L. STINE (the author)asks TIM (the illustrator):

R.L.: If you couldn't be an artist what would you like to be?

TIM: I would like to be a "Snowmaker" at one of the big ski resorts, out west, like Mammoth Mountain in California. You work at night when everyone goes home. Set up the snow guns, cover the slopes, and groom them with the Sno-Cat track machine. It's kinda like a snow tank! Then, you get to ski for free! I love that snow!

~

R.L.: When we were kids, my brother and I used to go to a horror movie every Saturday. We loved them all. The covers on our six Amazon books look like movie posters to me. Were you also influenced by horror movies? If so, which ones?

TIM: I was a complete "chicken" as a kid. I couldn't sit through any horror movie. The first scary movie I saw was on TV. It isn't really a horror movie. It was the Hunchback of Notre Dame-- the black-and-white version with Charles Laughton. That movie freaked me out! The mutant, Quasimodo, was something that REALLY could exist. Black-and-white movies, black-and-white photos--they all seem more "real" than full color to me.

~

R.L.: You have painted so many great covers. I think your scariest Goosebumps cover was for The Barking Ghost. And the black cat on The 13th Warning is really creepy. Do you have a favorite cover? Is it a scary one or a funny one?

TIM: It's hard to pick a favorite. But you gotta love the blue bathroom blobs in Monster Blood IV. That one is a little creepy and WAY funny. For just outright scary, I love the ticket taker in Zombie Town!

~

R.L.: What was the weirdest thing someone ever asked you to draw?

TIM: Oh, I have drawn a lot of weird stuff. One time, I had to paint a pimple! You know... acne! It was a medical illustration. Gross. When I first started illustrating, I painted pictures of food. My food illustrations were used in the Sunday newspaper for the local supermarket. I painted every food you can imagine. I can draw a pretty mean potato!

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amy Aldrich on December 3, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Let's Get This Party Haunted is the sixth (out of eight) in R.L. Stein's Mostly Ghostly series and we join Max (about to turn 12) practicing for the magic show he has planed for his upcoming birthday project...working with Quinten a new friend who shares his love of magic and hoping that he can get Traci (the most popular girl at school) to come to his party. He's got a bit of a problem though...he's got two other friends, Nicky and Tara and they just happen to be ghosts who always seem to get Max into more trouble then he could ever get in on his own.

Max's goal is to invite Traci (and her cool friends by proxy), pull off a spectacular party that will wow them and prove that he's not the weirdo everyone thinks he is. Unfortunately, Max seems to have the worst luck of any boy ever written about...he's got a horrible older brother, his father thinks he's worthless because he's smart instead of a jock (like his brother), a mom who is indifferent at best, a best friend who is NEVER then when he needs a buddy (he gets grounded on Max's birthday, typical), and two ghost friends who are always lousing up his plans.

Will Max pull off a great party? Will he impress Traci and her friends? Who is that boy in black who is still lurking about? Where did those specters come from? You'll have to read to find out...and this one has more twists and scares than usual, but still this series is leaving me unsatisfied due to the nature of Max's life...I just don't like the abuse that is heaped upon him by his brother and father, it just plays into a poor me, my life is so hard mentality that a lot of kids have.
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By Justin's_girl_2006 on April 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
i love it when max tries to talk to traci and the first time nicky and tare make his bike fly and he says no wait! please don't do this! and the second time nicky and tare get clay everywhere in the art room and max says stop this! can't you stop this gulp! and a big glob of clay gets in his mouth and he is forced to swallow it!
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A Kid's Review on December 5, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I liked the "twists" in this story - thinking one thing was going to happen, and it didn't. I thought the book was scarier than the Goosebumps.
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By CJF on October 26, 2005
Format: Hardcover
My daughter reads all of of the books in this series and begs for more.
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