Letters to an American Lady and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Currently Unavailable
Want us to email you when this item becomes available?
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Letters to an American Lady (Cat. No. 174) Audio, Cassette – January 1, 1987


See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Audio, Cassette
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$0.91
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Cat. No. 174
  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: Northstar Audio Books Inc (a) (January 1987)
  • ISBN-10: 9999822517
  • ISBN-13: 978-9999822510
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,958,372 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

-- J. R. R. Tolkien
"Deeply interesting and very moving."

-- Robert Cromie in Chicago Tribune
"A literary gem."

-- Christianity Today
"The reader will discover testimony for the patient faith and generous life of the private man who was this century's most famous Christian apologist. . . . Lewis readers will treasure these letters for the glimpse they offer into the personal witness of the man." --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

(1898-1963) He held the chair of Medieval and Renaissance English Literature at Cambridge University in England. Among his many famous works are Mere Christianity, The Screwtape Letters, the Chronicles of Narnia series, Miracles, The Abolition of Man, The Great Divorce, The Problem of Pain, and Surprised by Joy. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Mere Christianity, Out of the Silent Planet, The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics The Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and been transformed into three major motion pictures.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
9
4 star
5
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 16 customer reviews
I found his advice very pertinent.
R. E. Whitlock
I found this book as enjoyable--and helpful--as anything I've read by Lewis.
Colleen Frost
Love this man's spiritual insights, passion and compassion.
LSM

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Paul M. Dubuc on April 16, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is a collection of letters written by C. S. Lewis to an American woman during the last 13 years of his life. I found it pretty dull reading at first. The book only contains Lewis' half of the conversation and most of the letters are pretty short or deal with trivial matters. But, for those who are interested in a more of a personal glimpse of Lewis there are some interesting insights offered: Like what he thought about what journalists have written about him in papers and magazines, his correspondence during the years of his marriage to Joy Davidman (and after her death), the heaviness of the load of correspondence he carried on with many people. Lewis appears to have seen letter writing as more of a duty than a pleasure. He often complained that the load of personal mail made his life miserable, especially at Christmastime. Yet he seems to have faithfully read and answered all those letters.
Toward the end of the book the letters get more lengthy and and interesting. I was particularly struck by Lewis' attitude toward dying. He was able to look forward to his eventual death with a genuine hope and longing for the better world beyond these "shadowlands" and he was able to encourage this lady along those lines through the problems they both had with aging and poor health. I hope such a mature attitude of faith will be mine also when my time comes. It is the hallmark of a life lived for the glory and love of God.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By E. Johnson on October 17, 2000
Format: Paperback
Of course CS Lewis has proven to be the most popular Christian author of the 20th century. And for good reason. He's articulate, well-reasoned, and he certainly has a way with words. This book gives an inside look at Lewis as he corresponds with an American woman whom he apparently never met. The letters were written between 1950 until he died in 1963. If you like reading other peoples' mail (what is it, esp. we Americans have, with such things?), then this can make for interesting reading. Much of what he says here, though, is pretty trivial and doesn't get very deep. But if you want a personal glimpse of Lewis, its probably worth the read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. E. Whitlock on December 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is a lovely short book. Lewis' correspondent has her share of health problems, money worries, and family and work troubles. He shows himself a kind and generous man, spiritually encouraging this woman whom he was never to meet, as well as helping her financially. He has a kind and tactful way of expressing himself when they disagree. This book shows a very human side of Lewis. I found his advice very pertinent.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Clemence on December 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
Letters to an American Lady is a compilation of letters C.S. Lewis wrote to a woman in the US named Mary, whom he never met face-to-face, over the last 13 years of his life (1950-1963). While most other Lewis books, essays, lectures, etc, introduce the reader to his theology, philosophy and imagination, this book provides a behind-the-scenes look at the man himself. We learn of his day-to-day routine, his various health maladies, his thoughts on cats and dogs (turns out he's more of a "cat person"), and his genuine humility and desire to encourage others. The reader also learns how Lewis dealt with the sickness and death of his wife, and, just three years after that, his own impending demise. And although these letters are "mere" personal correspondences not originally meant for publication, one may still glean a good bit of wisdom from them, as well. Lewis ("Jack" to his friends) has much to say to Mary about dependence upon God and others, the need for one to live in the present, the Christian's appropriate attitude toward death, and much more. For anyone who wants to get to know C.S. Lewis as a person--and receive some wise counsel while so doing--this is a great little book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steven H. Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on September 9, 2013
Format: Paperback
Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was a novelist, academic, medievalist, lay theologian, and Christian apologist who held academic positions at both Oxford University and Cambridge University. He wrote many other books, such as Mere Christianity, Miracles, Problem of Pain, The Screwtape Letters, A Grief Observed, The World's Last Night, The Abolition of Man, The Great Divorce, God in the Dock, Christian Reflections, etc.

This posthumous 1967 book contains Lewis's letters to a "widow four years older than Lewis... [Who} Once financially independent... had fallen upon privation and... [had] serious family problems... Lewis arranged through his American publishers a small stipend for her...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?