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Letting Ana Go Paperback – June 4, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Simon Pulse; 5.5.2013 edition (June 4, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1442472138
  • ISBN-13: 978-1442472136
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.9 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (58 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,610 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 8 Up-Fans of Go Ask Alice (Prentice-Hall, 1971) and Laurie Halse Anderson's Wintergirls (Viking, 2009) will gravitate to this compelling account of one girl's battle with anorexia. Asked to maintain a food diary as a part of her cross-country training, the unnamed narrator begins her story as a healthy, well-adjusted teen from a privileged family. Her overweight mother struggles with food issues on a daily basis and receives little emotional support from her husband, who either humiliates or ignores her. Witnessing the deterioration of her parents' marriage, the teen becomes overwhelmed by a flood of conflicting emotions and channels her need for order into restricting what she eats. Through her journal entries, readers witness her gradual descent from self-discipline to denial as she convinces herself that she grows emotionally stronger as she eats less. Readers will relate to the teen's experiences navigating family dynamics, friendship, and relationships, and the first-person narrative lends realism to her character as it allows access to the reasoning behind her misguided decisions. As real as she appears, however, the prose seems too polished and situations feel staged for dramatic effect. Those seeking an authentic story may be better served reading a harrowing memoir such as Marya Hornbacher's Wasted: A Memoir of Anorexia and Bulimia (HarperCollins, 1998).-Audrey Sumser, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Mayfield, OHα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

Written, organized, designed, and titled in the style of Go Ask Alice (1971), this is the predictably bleak tale of an unnamed 16-year-old girl whose interest in losing a few pounds becomes a five-alarm fire of anorexia. The clipped, first-person diary narrative is as much of its time as Alice was in its own, complete with such modern devices as a calorie-counting app that the diarist and her best friend use to monitor their weight loss. If you’ve read books like this before—and you probably have—you know the drill: “mindful” eating leading to pleasing early results, mistaking people’s concern for jealousy, unsettling details (using red marker to circle the “fat” areas of her body), misplaced pride at her discipline (“thinspiration”), breakdown, rehab, and relapse. Parents and coaches receive a good deal of blame for praising the cosmetic benefits of weight loss, heedless of the consequences, which makes this an interesting option for adult readers, too. The anonymous authorship allows for the kind of scared-straight ending rarely seen today—but familiar, of course, to those still scarred by Alice. Grades 8-12. --Daniel Kraus --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

Great, yet very sad story.
Aly
This book is the type of book that will stay with you long after you read it, I'm really glad I got the chance to read it.
Van @ Short and Sweet reviews
Sometimes, things are said and it actually makes me feel like crap about myself.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Van @ Short and Sweet reviews on June 9, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This is my first `Anonymous' book, having never read any of the other similar books published in the previous years (Go Ask Alice, Lucy in the Sky or Jay's Journal). LETTING ANA GO is the diary of a 16-year-old girl chronicling how a simple task of keeping a food journal for track turned into an uncontrollable obsession to be thin. At the beginning of each journal entry Ana jots down her weight trying to retain the daily suggested 2,200 calories intake. As the story progresses, Ana's best friend Jill convinces her to start losing weight with her. Ana's usual 2, 2000 calories went down to 1,700 calories, 1,200 and then 1,000 calories a day.

LETTING ANA GO gives readers a glimpse into the mind of someone who suffers with anorexia nervosa, a person who loses weight that would be consider unhealthy for their age and height. I don't know anyone that suffered an eating disorder, but this book shows how easily and scary a person can develop an eating disorder and not know it. It was sad to see how far Ana, and her friend Jill went to obtain the `model' figure. This is a real problem that many women have suffered for a long time, thanks to the media, magazines, and celebrities some women believe that in order to be considered beautiful they need to weight a certain amount, or their waistline needs to be certain size, etc. Ana's account is very real and disturbing, and though she's blinded by her own actions...it was also heartbreaking to see everyone that loved her unable to help her. Her parents checked her into a rehab facility, hoping that she'd get better and her boyfriend would always tell her how much he loved her and how beautiful she was but it was never enough.

LETTING ANA GO is an amazing and at the same time heartbreaking story.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By AT on June 21, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
As a person with an eating disorder, I chose this book as part of recovery. However, it was actually very triggering for me, and I relapsed for a bit during and after reading. I would read with caution if you del with similar issues.

On a side note, shame on the Kindle store...when I finished and was looking for another book to read, the suggestions for other books included a few about how to fast and low calorie diets. Not exactly the best suggestions for people finishing books about about dangers of eating disorders.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By SilverMoon on September 15, 2013
Format: Paperback
I have been an anorexic and bulimic for over a year now, I've been there and relate to a lot of what the character in the book had gone through with hospitalizations, obsessions with weight, overexercise, starving, purging, ect. I loved the book "Go Ask Alice" and so when I saw this book I purchased it on the spot. When I saw the title "Letting Ana Go", I knew right off the bat it had to do with anorexia. "Ana" is for anorexia and "mia" is obviously for bulimia. The ending is depressing as most of these anonymous diaries are, but I liked how this book calls for attention to the horror behind eating disorders and how they can completely consume one's mind, health, and ultimately their life. Near the end, the character tries to recover from her disorder and as most of us do, ends up relapsing and falls back into the arms of ana. I recommend this book for every teen who have thoughts of wanting to lose weight. Be safe and stay healthy.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Brenna on January 30, 2014
Format: Paperback
I've said in a number of my reviews that I'm typically not a fan of books written as journal entries. I haven't read very many "issue" books either - ones that are predominantly focused on exploring a heavy area. Letting Ana Go falls under both of those categories though, which is why I'd consider it to be a book that really pushed me out of my comfort zone as a reader.

And it's a good thing I did step out of my comfort zone for this one, because it was worth it. Letting Ana Go tackles challenging questions in a way that is well-developed and thoughtful, providing needed perspective on eating disorders.

Reasons to Read:

1. Perfectly paced plot:

You know exactly what Letting Ana Go is about before you even start reading about it. It's very clear that Ana is going to struggle with an eating disorder. But there is such gradual development here, it's like every spring when I watch for new leaves to grow on trees. I know they're coming soon, and it's a slow process that takes a few days and I try to pay attention for all the signs... but it isn't until it's too late that you realize the leaves are all out in full bloom. That was exactly how I felt as Ana's struggle with food and her body image grew increasingly complex and problematic. The pacing is absolutely flawless, which is necessary to make this believable.

2. A surreal atmosphere:

The writing style creates a very dream-like quality to the story, which is furthered along by the plot and the gradual takeover by this disorder in Ana's life. I find very few books that are able to express so much confusion, obsession, and even fear within the character's head and truly articulate these feelings onto paper (another one I'd recommend for this is Dreamland by Sarah Dessen).
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Megan on July 1, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Well written. Approachable, average characters. Heart wrenching. Not for children though, mature themes and content. Definitely Going on my shelf!!
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