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Lewis and Clark: A Prairie Dog for the President (Step into Reading, Step 3) Paperback – Dolby, May 27, 2003


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Lewis and Clark: A Prairie Dog for the President (Step into Reading, Step 3) + George Washington and the General's Dog (Step-Into-Reading, Step 3) + Christopher Columbus (Step into Reading, Step 3, Grades 1-3)
Price for all three: $11.97

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 3
  • Series: Step into Reading
  • Paperback: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers; 1 edition (May 27, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780375811203
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375811203
  • ASIN: 0375811206
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #196,985 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Gr. 1-3. The history is handled with a light touch in this Step into Reading title about the American West, and Manders' colorful cartoon-style art is a perfect match for the storytelling. President Jefferson asks Lewis and Clark to go west, and "make maps, and explore rivers . . . collect plants and draw wild animals . . . send presents." Comic scenes show the explorers trying to catch buffalo and grizzly bears to send to the president, but they settle on the cute, little, wild dog, which scouts take back to Jefferson together with a huge load of plants, skins, and animals. Other than Sacagawea, who is a big help ("she talked and traded with the Indians they met on the way"), there's no mention of the native peoples the explorers encountered, but this lively history will make new readers want to know more. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to the Library Binding edition.

From the Inside Flap

In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson sends Lewis and Clark out west to explore. He tells them to make maps. He tells them to draw pictures and collect plants. Most importantly, he tells them to send presents! What kind of present is good enough for a president? Beginning readers will truly enjoy reading about this fun and little-known slice of American history.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Entertaining text and great comical illustrations!
Red-Wagon
My two boys love this book, my eight year old who likes history reads it to his little brother who is four.
AJ
Overall, this is a really good book that children will enjoy reading and learn some history in the process.
tvtv3

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer McKerley on May 28, 2003
Format: Library Binding
Lewis and Clark, A Prairie Dog for the President, is a fun read that's nicely paced. Author Shirley Raye Redmond uses whimsy and humor to tell this historic event: President Jefferson sends the eager Lewis and Clark off to explore the West. The vast young nation has never been fully explored. The president wonders how long it will take to get to the end of it and what they will find. One of my favorite parts is the banter over what to name the barking prairie creature they discover and send back to Jefferson.
"You can call it a ground rat."
"No, it looks like squirrel. I'll call it a barking squirrel."
"Squirrels don't bark. Dogs bark. We should call it a prairie dog."
"That's it!" Lewis and Clark agreed.
Later it starts all over again, when the President asks, "Is it a gopher?"
The illustrations by John Manders are just as pleasing. I like the facial expressions on the people and animals, especially the mischievous smile of the prairie dog. Manders is skilled at portraying action and emotions. And like the author, his sense of humor is so much fun. A buffalo and bear pose to be sketched. A buffalo won't fit in a shipping crate. Prairie dogs pop in and out of holes, eluding capture. A poor scout is so weighed down with "presents" for the President, he must be hoisted onto a boat.
Together, Shirley Raye Redmond and John Manders have created a delightful book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By tvtv3 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
LEWIS AND CLARK: A PRAIRIE DOG FOR THE PRESIDENT is a step 3 young readers book that discusses how the Lewis and Clark expedition began, what it's purpose was, and some of the strange sights that the group of explorers saw. The story has some words that the youngest of readers might not be able to handle, but contains enough familiar words and phrases that somewhat older readers (1-3rd graders) won't have any problems and might pick up a few new vocabulary words. The illustration by John Manders is really what makes this book stand out as it adds a depth of humor to the text that would otherwise be lacking. For instance, the picture of the overburden scout carrying a cage with a prairie dog and another with some magpies, traveling to Baltimore to deliver the plants, animals, and other goods and a letter to the President is quite funny. Overall, this is a really good book that children will enjoy reading and learn some history in the process.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ravenskya VINE VOICE on June 11, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I just bought about 30 children's books for my son's 7th birthday which is fast approaching. He is entering second grade, but we are told he is an "Advanced Reader." What I do know is that he'll read ANYTHING just to prove he can, but he always goes back to the books with the cute pictures. I gave him this book early because we went on a long road trip and I needed to keep my sanity.

When this one arrived I read through it before hiding it in the birthday present storage facility under my bed. This book is Adorable! The illustrations will have the kids laughing, the job they did at conveying humor through the facial expressions is wonderful. The buffalo jammed into the crate is by far one of my favorite pictures other than the Prairie Dog himself.

What I was most happy with was that it is a cute tale about real history. The kind of stuff they are leaving out of the schools these days. My husband was astounded that these little readers had historical information that he didn't know. They did an amazing job of taking history and making it fun. I couldn't be happier with this book.

Though there are a few larger words in it, my son had no trouble reading it. He actually read it beginning to end 3 times and had to show me the pictures over and over. Since giving it to him, he's taken this specific book everywhere with him.

The premise is the story of Lewis and Clark and their famous expedition. It covers the things they saw, the reason for the trip, and that they sent many items back for the president to see - including the silly little prairie dogs. My son laughed and lauged and then proceeded to tell me the storie even without the book.

"Did you know Lewis and Clark saw Buffalo?
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Since my Kindergartener (age five-and-a-half) had completed the Step 2 books in the Step Into Reading series of books, I decided to go ahead and purchase the Step 3 books. I was a bit hesitant because I noticed there is quite a big leap between the Step 2 and Step 3 books, especially in terms of vocabulary and sentence structure. The vocabulary is more advanced with higher order words, and the sentences are longer. I was also concerned that my daughter might not like the topics which seemed to be more 'academic' with history-based stories. My worries were unfounded. She loves the books and is reading them with very little help from me.

These books are excellent for building children's reading skills as well as increasing their confidence. Once you've completed the Step 1 and Step 2 books (I would advise proceeding level by level), the Step 3 books are not as daunting as they might first appear. In "Lewis and Clark", young readers are introduced to the intrepid explorers whose adventures are now part of American history. Their adventures are vividly illustrated with color illustrations that will appeal to visual learners (my daughter is certainly motivated by illustrations - she still balks at reading books that are text-heavy with few illustrations).

I can't recommend these books highly enough - they are great for building reading skills, and also educational. This book is a great introduction to history, and I also came up with a series of short comprehension questions based on the story in this book so as to hone my daughter's comprehension skills (e.g. "Who were Lewis and Clark?" "What animal did they give to the President?" etc.).
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