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49 of 58 people found the following review helpful
Capacity: 16 GBVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
இ Fuzzy Wuzzy's Summary:
ѾѾѾѾѾ Highly recommended with warm fuzzies!

փ Positives:

փ Screaming fast performance, but only if your high-end camera and newer-model card reader can keep up with this card's UDMA-7 read/write speeds.
փ Supports the Video Performance Guarantee (VPG-20) specification for professional-quality 1080P HD video capture at 20 MB/sec speed.
փ Includes downloadable "Image Rescue 4" software that can aid in recovering photo and video files lost due to deletion or card corruption.
փ Limited lifetime warranty.

ჯ Negatives:

ჯ To fully take advantage of this card's write speed from the camera to the memory card, your professional-class camera must be able to write the data out that fast. And to take advantage of its read speed from the memory card reader to your computer, your card reader needs to be able to write that fast.

As both the speed and capacity of CompactFlash cards keeps increasing every year, this UDMA-7 card from Lexar yet again pushes the outer limits of read/write speeds. It was not that long ago when a "133x" CompactFlash card seemed really fast. But this ever-increasing need for speed and capacity becomes more and more important as more cameras can now record 1080P HD video, frame rates increase, and both the frames per second and continuous burst shooting capabilities of prosumer-class and professional-class cameras increase with each year's new dSLR models.

I received this Lexar Professional 1000x 16-GB CompactFlash Card shortly after I had upgraded my Canon 7D's firmware from version 1.2.5 to the latest version 2.0.0. Canon released this version 2.0.0 firmware for their 7D about three weeks ago at the start of August. Having used Canon dSLRs since their EOS D60 in 2002, I have been accustomed to a variety of Canon's firmware updates for their dSLR cameras. But this version 2.0.0 firmware update for their 7D is one of the largest and most significant firmware updates that I have ever seen. I almost feel like I have a brand new version of the 7D by just updating to this new firmware version. Included in this large firmware update is a huge improvement to the 7D's continuous-shooting buffer depth, increasing the continuous burst buffer space from the original specs of 15 RAW files to a whopping 25 RAW files. Combined with the 7D's 8 frames/second speed in high-speed continuous shooting mode, this makes the camera even more ideal for action/sports/wildlife photography and it starts to edge closer to UDMA-7 speeds. But, alas, Canon states that even with this new 7D firmware 2.0: "UDMA 7 CF memory card read/write speeds are not fully supported with the EOS 7D Digital SLR camera. If using UDMA 7 memory cards, the read/write speeds will be equivalent to UDMA 6."

To both test the improvements to my Canon 7D's continuous-shooting buffer depth and to also test how fast my 7D can write files to this Lexar 1000x 16-GB CompactFlash card, I performed a series of tests after upgrading my 7D to its new firmware version 2.0.0. These tests were performed after I freshly formatted this Lexar 16-GB card in my 7D camera and had a fully charged battery. The following measurements consist of shooting my 7D in two higher ISO settings to purposely create larger file sizes (versus shooting at ISO 100). I usually try hard to go no higher than ISO 400 to minimize noise being introduced, but I will sometimes go up to ISO 3200 for low-light or nighttime hand-held shooting, and I try to avoid going beyond ISO 3200 unless I really have to. So I performed a series of continuous burst shooting at both ISO 400 and ISO 3200 with the camera set to output either only L(arge)-Fine JPG files, only L(arge)-size RAW files, or dual Large-RAW and Large-Fine-JPG outputs.

For each of the six RAW/JPG and ISO combinations below, I list the number of images that can be stored on this Lexar 16-GB card.

For the four L(arge)-RAW-only and dual Large-RAW and Large-Fine-JPG tests below, I kept shooting the camera in high-speed continuous mode until its buffer filled up and it had to pause. During this time, I tracked the number of seconds that the camera's card status light remained lit while it was busy writing files to the Lexar card. I then recorded the total number of files that were written onto the card during the continuous burst shooting and the total number of bytes used by those files. For each of the RAW/JPG and ISO combinations, I repeated the burst-shooting three times and averaged the results. There was very little variation for the file count, byte size, and timings in between each set of three tests within a group. From the total bytes written and seconds that it took to write to the memory card, I arrived at a "Bytes/second" write speed for writing data from the camera to this Lexar card.

L-size RAW only at ISO 400
--------------------------------------------------
Maximum images that can be stored: 592
Files recorded into continuous burst buffer (average of 3 tries): 29
Total bytes of all files recorded onto card (average of 3 tries): 680,617,662
Seconds that card status light remained lit (average of 3 tries): 10
Bytes/seconds = 680,617,662/10 = 68 MB/sec

L-size RAW only at ISO 3200
--------------------------------------------------
Maximum images that can be stored: 540
Files recorded into continuous burst buffer (average of 3 tries): 23
Total bytes of all files recorded onto card (average of 3 tries): 707,076,916
Seconds that card status light remained lit (average of 3 tries): 10
Bytes/seconds = 707,076,916/10 = 71 MB/sec

L-size RAW with L-fine JPG at ISO 400
--------------------------------------------------
Maximum images that can be stored: 461
Files recorded into continuous burst buffer (average of 3 tries): 38 (19 CR2/JPG pairs)
Total bytes of all files recorded onto card (average of 3 tries): 568,274,502
Seconds that card status light remained lit (average of 3 tries): 15
Bytes/seconds = 568,274,502/15 = 38 MB/sec

L-size RAW with L-fine JPG at ISO 3200
--------------------------------------------------
Maximum images that can be stored: 425
Files recorded into continuous burst buffer (average of 3 tries): 34 (17 CR2/JPG pairs)
Total bytes of all files recorded onto card (average of 3 tries): 608,925,777
Seconds that card status light remained lit (average of 3 tries): 16
Bytes/seconds = 608,925,777/16 = 38 MB/sec

The two ISO400/3200 tests for shooting only L(arge)-Fine JPG required a slightly different approach. Unlike the above four L(arge)-RAW-only and dual Large-RAW and Large-Fine-JPG tests where my 7D noticeably paused when the camera's internal buffer filled up and the camera then waited for a short duration for the Lexar card to catch up, when shooting JPG-only, there was a far shorter pause after about 6 to 10 seconds of shooting and then the camera would quickly shoot 3 or 4 more shots followed by another very quick pause. So to measure the throughput to the Lexar card when shooting JPG-only, I kept the shutter button constantly pressed for exactly 30 seconds, and then I also timed how long the card status light remained lit. As with the numbers for the "L-size RAW with L-fine JPG" listed above, there is a speed overhead when shooting JPG, either in JPG-only mode or dual RAW/JPG output. But as the numbers below show, it is interesting that after I kept the shutter button constantly pressed for 30 seconds, the camera continued writing to the Lexar card for only an additional 4 or 5 seconds. My 7D camera's internal pipeline is the actual limiting factor in how fast it could clear out its buffer and write everything on the card. With the 7D's new 2.0.0 firmware version, Canon states that the 7D's buffer can store about 130 L(arge)-Fine JPG files. So the extra 4 to 5 seconds of latency is due to the camera writing the remaining buffer contents onto the card.

L-fine JPG only at ISO 400
--------------------------------------------------
Maximum images that can be stored: 2084
Seconds that I kept the shutter button pressed: 30
Files recorded after shooting for 30 seconds (average of 3 tries): 235 (almost 8 shots/second!)
Total bytes of all files recorded onto card (average of 3 tries): 1,619,609,533
Seconds that card status light remained lit (average of 3 tries): 34
Bytes/seconds = 1,619,609,533/34 = 48 MB/sec

L-fine JPG only at ISO 3200
--------------------------------------------------
Maximum images that can be stored: 2026
Seconds that I kept the shutter button pressed: 30
Files recorded after shooting for 30 seconds (average of 3 tries): 230 (almost 8 shots/second!)
Total bytes of all files recorded onto card (average of 3 tries): 1,732,094,464
Seconds that card status light remained lit (average of 3 tries): 35
Bytes/seconds = 1,732,094,464/35 = 49 MB/sec

From the above results, a RAW-only continuous burst write speed of 68 MB/sec at ISO 400 is quite fast, and being able to continuously shoot more than 20 RAWs at 8 frames per second is ideal for action/sports/wildlife photography, but it still does not fully take advantage of this card's 1000x UDMA-7 maximum speed capability. But my tests proved to me that (1) the new firmware update for my 7D did indeed dramatically boosted the continuous burst buffer of my 7D, and (2) even with the 7D's fast shooting, the limiting factor was still the camera and I never even once bumped up against this card's upper speed ceiling for either shooting extended 1080P HD videos at 30 frames/second or high-speed continuous photo shoots.

I currently do not have a UDMA-7 USB 3.0 card reader, so I did not test this card's read speed when transferring files from a UDMA-7-compatible card reader to a computer. Although it may matter for your purposes, my card reader's read speed is not that important to me. When I need to transfer files from multiple CompactFlash cards to my computer, I use two separate USB 2.0 card readers that are both plugged into my computer, and I just keep feeding them cards while I work on other things. I will eventually purchase a UDMA-7 USB 3.0 card reader. But for now, using two USB 2.0 card readers to simultaneously transfer files to my computer works fine for me :)

Inside this card's box package are two sheets. One sheet states that in order to use these Lexar Professional 1000x CompactFlash cards with Lexar's Lexar Media Inc. Dual Slot USB 3.0 Reader Professional (LRW307URBNA), you must download and update its firmware from the URL on Lexar's Web site that is mentioned on the sheet. The other sheet includes a serial number code for use in activating Lexar's "Image Rescue 4" software. You can download the "Image Rescue 4" software from the URL on Lexar's Web site that is mentioned on this sheet.

The downloadable Lexar "Image Rescue 4" software that is included free with this CompactFlash card is similar to Transcend's "RecoverRx" and SanDisk's "RescuePro" software. As with software that tries to recover files that were deleted on a computer hard drive, the "Image Rescue 4" scans and looks for deleted/missing files that can be recovered. If you accidentally deleted some photo or video files from a camera memory card, your best chance for success is to immediately stop using the card, remove it from the camera, and try to recover it using the "Image Rescue 4" (or similar) software. If you have taken additional shots on your camera after accidentally deleting some files, there is a greater chance that the new photo/video files may have overwritten some part of the original image data that you are trying to recover. And if the card is actually damaged or corrupted, the data recovery software may also be of no use.

௫ Fuzzy Wuzzy's Conclusion:

This is an excellent UDMA-7 CompactFlash card that is suitable for the most demanding, large and fast camera buffer, and high frame-rate photo and video applications. Most consumer-class and prosumer-class dSLR cameras currently cannot write to this card fast enough, so your money may be better spent on a less expensive UDMA-6/600x, 400x, or slower card, especially if you have an entry-level dSLR. UDMA-6/600x CompactFlash cards have been on the market now for about three years, their prices have become cheaper, and their write speeds are a better match for the current crop of consumer/prosumer-class dSLR cameras. But some of the latest professional-grade dSLR cameras, such as Canon's EOS 1D-X and Nikon's D4, are now appearing that do fully support UDMA-7 speed. Likewise, if you rarely shoot in high-speed continuous burst modes that are indispensable for action/sports/wildlife photography and you rarely shoot 1080P HD video using your dSLR, a CompactFlash card with a speed rating of 133x, 266x, or 400x may be perfectly fine for your needs, and you can use the money that you saved to buy better high-end lenses :-) because, at the time of this review's writing, this 1000x card does cost more than most other 16-GB cards and you are paying a premium for its speed when used in a camera with fast photo/video shooting that can quickly feed data into the card. Action, sports, and wildlife photography can really benefit from a dSLR that has a high frames/second capability (at least 3 or 4 frames/second), a high internal memory buffer to keep the continuous shooting going without stutters, and fast hardware to write all that data to a UDMA-7 card like this Lexar CompactFlash. With this kind of action/sports/wildlife photography, I usually capture several perfect "caught in the act" shots while deleting plenty of other shots.

But one purchasing decision that you have to consider is if your camera can write data fast enough onto this card to fully make use of its speed, or if you have a UDMA-7 USB 3.0 card reader that can read data from this card at its maximum speed. A UDMA-7-enabled card reader is inexpensive to purchase, and the high speed at which you can transfer files from a UDMA-7-enabled card reader to your computer may be enough justification to buy this card. If you have a prosumer-class dSLR and you shoot a lot of 1080P HD video using the highest frame rate, this is also an excellent card choice. And if you have a professional-class dSLR that can output at UDMA-7 speeds, this card is a must-buy!

At the present time, the 16-GB size of this card being reviewed is my favorite CompactFlash card size for the main reason that I do not like the idea of "keeping all of my photo/video eggs in just one (or a few) baskets". Even though I have never encountered a complete card failure and inability to retrieve the files from any of my SanDisk, Lexar, or Kingston CompactFlash cards (knock hard on wood), and I have only encountered an occasional rare corrupted single file here or there, I still like the idea that my complete set of images, which may include many thousands of dual RAW/JPG files and HD videos that sometimes add up to 400 GB of data for a three or four week travel outing, are spread across multiple cards in case one particular card becomes totally unreadable, or even accidentally lost. And as added insurance, during the trip, I copy the files from my CompactFlash cards onto a laptop's hard drive or another portable hard drive. Eventually, I will migrate more of my card usage up to 32 GB sizes. But I do not trust the idea of putting all the photos and videos from a 3-week travel outing on a handful of 128-GB cards just yet, because if just one 128-GB card gets lost or corrupted, I lose a huge amount of photos :-) So far, after filling up this Lexar 16-GB card with photos/videos more than 22 times, I have not encountered any glitches, corrupted files, or data loss.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on March 21, 2013
Bought this card for my D800 and had been very pleased with the performance. However it just failed and nothing I've tried has been successful in bringing it back to life. I'm getting the formatting message on the camera LCD. Have tried in camera and via my Windows PC. Tried several rescue programs with no luck. The PC will either show me the format pop up box or just does not recognize the card at all. The good news is that I had configured my second slot as a backup so the photos were not lost.

This is the second Lexar Pro card to fail me in as many years. I've been photographing with DSLR's since the D100 came out and have yet to have a SanDisk card fail. Not saying it's not possible but just my experience with them. Not buying any more Lexar cards if I can help it.

Lexar is replacing both cards.

May 9, 2013 update: Lexar was very quick to provide both and RMA and replacement cards. I've been using the new card for several weeks now and as long as it does not fail I'm very pleased with the card performance. I'm changing my overall rating from 1 star to 3 for now.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
Capacity: 16 GBVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
With fast shooting high mega pixel digital cameras, the CF card can be a major performance factor, especially now that many DSLR cameras include video capture. Why purchase a DSLR camera and use a slow CF card? I'd rather take advantage of a high performance CF card than become frustrated with shutter slowdowns and time consuming image transfers. Is the Lexar Professional 1000x CF card a good match for my Canon EOS 7D?

The Lexar Professional 1000x CF cards use UDMA 7 (Ultra Direct Mode Access 7) technology to read at 150 mb/sec, write at 145 mb/sec, and has a maximum transfer rate of up to 167MB/sec. These fast read/write speeds are desirable with large image files, especially when there are many. Plus cameras typically use buffer memory to hold images while writing to the card during continuous shots. At some point, if the card cannot write fast enough, the camera will stop shooting until the buffer clears enough room for more images.

Shooting L-Raw + L-jpg, I was able to take 84 consecutive shots before the camera buffer started filling up with the Lexar Professional 1000x CF card. Doing the same test on my older SanDisk Ultra II CF card, I was able to shoot 13 shots, Then on my SanDisk Ultra IV CF card, I was able to shoot 44 consecutive shots. The Lexar Professional 1000x CF card also supports shooting in VPG-20 for professional quality video. "This means the card's been tested and guaranteed for professional video capture streams at up to 20MB/s", enabling 1080p full-HD and 3D video capture at high frame rates and no dropped frames when used with a compatible camera. For those shooting consecutive shots or movies, clearly the speed of the Lexar Professional 1000x CF card makes a difference.

Although there are currently a limited number of cameras on the market which can take advantage of the UDMA 7's speed. Only Canon EOS cameras are listed as compatible on Lexar's support webpage, plus according to Nikon so is the D4 and D800. While my Canon EOS 7D when upgraded to firmware 2.0.X is compatible, I can only achieve UDMA 6 equivalent speeds.

Professional level CF cards commonly include data recovery software. Lexar's Professional 1000x CF card line includes the latest version of their award-winning Lexar Image Rescue® software. This software package provides recovery of most photo and video files, even when they've been erased or the CF card has been corrupted.

Using the Image Rescue4 is pretty simple. First download the software, which could be purchased separately, from Lexar's imagerescue4 web page and install. Use the supplied code to unlock the software, then open to use. A small screen appears giving several options including Open to browse, "Erase Card", "Format Card", and "Start Scan" to find and recover lost files. The software is intuitive, and recovering files seems to be time consuming but effortless.

The Lexar Professional 1000x CF memory card is designed to withstand tough conditions. Due to a high impact rating, this card is tough enough to endure significant drops, vibrations, and impacts. For example; if you were to accidentally drop the Lexar Professional 1000x CF card and it hit the floor and bounced a few times before settling on the ground, this card is rated to sustain the fall without any damage. Lexar has an interesting video on YouTube titled "Lexar: How We Test" to show what this CF card can withstand. Additionally, the Lexar Professional 1000x CF memory card can operate in extreme temperatures ranging from -20°C (-4°F) to 85° C (185° F).

People generally want to know how many images a card will hold. This is a difficult question to answer and greatly depends on both the card and the camera it is used in. The number of images this CF card will hold on my Canon 7D also depends on the settings used. Let me provide a few settings and image counts for an idea of what this card holds.

Shooting L-Raw w/ISO 100 - 609 images
Shooting L-Raw w/ISO 800 - 576 images
Shooting L-Raw + L-jpg w/ISO 100 - 482 images
Shooting L-Raw + L-jpg w/ISO 800 - 448 images
Shooting M-Raw w/ISO 100 - 898 images
Shooting M-Raw w/ISO 800 - 836 images
Shooting Large jpg - 999 images (the 7D cannot provide counts above 999)

Worried about reliability? The Professional line is backed with a lifetime limited warranty within the US as long as owned by the original purchaser. The warranty ensures the Lexar Professional 1000x CF card is free of defects in materials and workmanship under normal use.

For my needs, my 2GB CF card is slow and too small. I prefer using my two 4GB CF cards instead, but have considered purchasing faster 8GB CF cards. I'm so impressed with the Lexar Professional 1000x 16GB CF card, I'll consider buying a second to replace the three cards I currently use. I doubt I would need 32GB for any one outing since I don't shoot a lot of video, however I like having two cards so I can pass one off for downloading while I continue shooting images with the other. Plus faster transfer speeds saves processing time. Lexar's Professional 1000x CF cards are definitely fast and worthy of consideration.

PROS:
Reliable
Fast read/write
Impact resistant
Low power consumption
Backed by a limited lifetime warranty
Free, dedicated customer support line
Supports VPG-20 video capture
Also available in 32GB,64GB, and 128GB capacities.

CONS:
UDMA 7 capable devices are limited
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon November 19, 2012
Capacity: 16 GBVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
In a nutshell, the "1000x" basically means 1000 x 150KB, so the speed of this card should be 150mb per second. However, I contacted Lexar directly and found out it is NOT as far as WRITE SPEED. The Lexar 16GB card only writes data at 95mb/sec. That's about the same as the SanDisk Extreme Pros which are UDMA 6 run at 90mb/sec. That's also the speed of the Lexar 600x series (600 x 150kb = 90mb/sec). What's interesting is that the Lexar 1000X in the 32GB and 64GB version do in fact write data near 150mb/sec! SO, I tested it, and sure enough, it's true. On a camera that supports UDMA 7 (in this case my Canon 5D3), this 16GB Lexar was able to handle 22 images before having to stop and let the buffer write and catch up, which takes about 3 seconds. That's nearly identical to my SanDisk Extreme Pros, as expected. Then, I did go ahead buy the 32GB Lexar 1000x and did the same test, and consistently I got 29-30 images before it halted to write to the buffer, and then the buffer only took about 1 second to clear. That's truly 1000x speed, but the 16GB version doesn't reach that, so it loses a star.

Two things to point out:
1) On a camera that supports the older UDMA 6 (such as the 5D Mark II), these 1000x cards are all going to run at the same speed as the 600X Lexars and the SanDisk Extreme Pros, about 90mb/sec. So buying the 16GB 1000x won't be a bad thing because it'd be running like a 600X anyway, which are getting harder to find.

2) I did these tests with RAW files, it won't work if you have your camera set to write JPEGs. JPEGs write at about 45mb/sec tops regardless of card and UDMA speed. That's because a JPEG is actually the camera taking the RAW file, adding saturation and sharpening and whatever esle is in the picture style, then compressing the image, discarding data, and writing it to the card in in JPEG format. That takes time which is why you'll never get full speed on a card shooting JPEGs, jsyk.

Last thing to mention is that the new Lexar 800x series that recently came out is supposed to be 120mb/sec (800 x 150kb), but that's only read speed, the write speed on those is around 45-60mb/sec, that's it, which is why they are so much cheaper. This is a little frustrating that Lexar keeps all of this info hidden, the cards are superb quality-wise and their recovery software is very good, but the inconsistent write speed specs are odd.

Bottom line: if you have a newer UDMA 7 capable camera, the 32gb Lexar 1000X is the real speed monster, something wedding and event shooters need to know about. The 32gb model is so fast, I bought 4 of them and sold the SanDisks. However, the 16GB in this review isn't really what it claims, but it only matters if you have a UDMA 7 camera. Hope this helps.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on May 24, 2013
This card froze up and is non functional. I understand that cards fail and I had a backup (shooting with a 5D Mark III). My issue is that Lexar support is told me 14-21 days for an RMA. This feels unreasonable to me. I need to purchase a replacement card now and I can't in good faith purchase a Lexar based on my support experience so far.
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70 of 96 people found the following review helpful
on July 25, 2012
Although, I read less than ideal reviews for the Lexar 1000x 32GB cf card, I wanted a UMDA7 to use with my new Canon 5D Mark iii so I bought it anyway as there were few other options. During the first few days of a 2 week vacation, the card just died, crashed, was no longer recognized by my camera or any card reader. I have 6 cf cards, 2 are Lexar and some are getting ancient but all still work. I returned it to Amazon shortly after returning from the trip and explained that it was no longer working. They refunded all but $50 as a restocking fee. Really? Why would they want to restock an item that is completely nonfunctional?! I am very disappointed in Amazon and Lexar.
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21 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on June 15, 2012
I sent the first one back on the advice of Lexar tech support because it didn't work in my Delkin USB 3.0 card reader. When the second card did the same I suspected the reader - sure enough you have to buy a new reader for these cards! Anyhow, after some fairly extensive tests (with the new reader and a really fast computer) I find the read speed is NOT 150Mb/sec as its supposed to be, its barely 90Mb/sec, but worse than that, the far more important write speed is actually SLOWER than my Transcend 600x (UDMA 6) card: while the Lexar sustained writes at 58Mb/sec the Transcend card sustained 62Mb/sec.
So my recommendation is, save your money, buy the Transcend card and you won't need a new reader!
Transcend 16 GB Compact Flash Card 600X TS16GCF600
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon August 20, 2012
Capacity: 16 GBVine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I take my memory cards pretty seriously. This one is still new so it's going to get in line behind about a dozen other 16GB and 8GB cards when I'm shooting anything important (something that I recommend to anyone and everyone -- especially those of you that have had bad experiences!). Never trust a brand new card to anything important!

That said, I've been using it since I got it for everything else, and it hasn't failed or given me even the slightest trouble in that time. Of course, after I have spent a lot more time with it and it DOES become one of my first cards in the lineup (at this speed, barring any failures it will probably be my #1 choice), I will update the review with my additional findings, if any.

Here's what I can tell you about the speed:

1) Card reader to computer: Don't know, don't care. Sorry. If it's faster or slower than other cards here, it means nothing to me.
2) In-Camera (Canon EOS 5D Mark II):

I set the camera to manual, 1/200 shutter at ISO 25600 (H2), RAW files. This setting produces the largest file size possible, about 36MB per file. Using the Lexar 1000x 16GB, I was able to fire off 12 shots before there was a pause for the buffer to catch up. Using a Sandisk Extreme 16GB (60MB/s), I was able to get 10 frames before a pause. When I lower the ISO to 100, reducing the RAW file size to about 25 MB, I can shoot 17 consecutive photos before a pause with the Lexar. One other interesting point is that the pauses, when they occur, seem to be significantly shorter than with the Sandisk cards, indicating that the Lexar is clearing the buffer much faster. By the time the Lexar hit a stopping point, just a fraction of a second later it was good for another three shots. I'm happy with that.

Just for reference, I also ran the high ISO test with an old SanDisk Ultra II 512MB card I had laying around, and it got through 7 frames before it paused. But then I had to wait a ridiculous amount of time before it was done recording! (and it was almost full)

Now luckily, I don't have much throughout the year that I need really high speed shooting for. It happens occasionally though, so I'm happy to have this card. Hopefully it will go on sale before my honeymoon in Hawaii in a couple of weeks, then I'll probably pick up four more.

One last note, on build quality: I don't know. Obviously, I haven't had it long enough. But I have several other Lexar Pro's, a couple of 16GB cards and a couple of 8GB cards. Not a single failure among them. To be fair, that goes for the SanDisks as well, knock on wood. I always buy either Lexar Pro or SanDisk Extreme, and neither has let me down, ever. Most of my in-use cards are as old as my camera (bought the day it was released in 2008), and they are still going strong with hundreds of thousands of total file writes completed.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on June 28, 2013
Just disappointed with the Seller's (Beach Camera) sneaky move to send me an Open box item instead of a brand new sealed item even though I was charged the price of a new item. Thanks to Amazon's trusted return policy I sent the item back right away and ordered the it from Adorama instead.
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18 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on August 5, 2012
Took my first vacation with this card. Upon my return I found that some of the files on the card were corrupt. After managing to recover what I could reformatted the drive and started to test the card by copying a large number of images to the card. I filled the card to almost capacity without any errors. As soon as I tried to open some of the files my Mac could no longer access the card and went into an endless loop of mounting then ejecting the card. Given that I'm not the only person to be bitten, I'd avoid purchasing this card.
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